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r the slate and wrote, My wife saved it. All the triumphs of my life were and are concentrated in and excelled by this blessed memory. He sat patiently until the examinations were over, without a word of remonstrance, and was taken nearly fainting back to bed. Dr. Hayes asked me if he was never irritable and remarked such patience surpasses that of man, it is godlike. There he lay, silent, uncomplaining, anxious to save everyone trouble, and most concerned about my little brother, Jefferson Davis Howell, who was ill with scarlet fever in the room above. As soon as Mr. Davis could speak he insisted on going up to him. When I objected because he had never had the disease, he watched the opportunity of my absence and had himself led upstairs. On my return he was sitting close by the child, whispering, for he could not speak yet aloud, bear stories to him with his arm under the little man's head, looking as happy as he. This boy was the pride of his later years and the object of hi
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 64: capture of President Davis, as written by himself. (search)
s as little unnecessary pain as he could, but of the horrors and sufferings on that journey it is difficult to speak. I told him that some of the men with me were on parole, that they were riding their own horses-private property-and I hoped they would be permitted to retain them. I have a distinct recollection that he promised me it should be done, but have since learned that their horses were taken; and some who were on parole, viz., Major Moran, Captain Moody, Lieutenant Hathaway, Midshipman Howell, and Private Messec, who had not violated their obligation of parole, but were voluntarily travelling with my family to protect them from marauders, were prisoners of war, and all incarcerated in disregard of the protection promised when they surrendered. At Augusta we were put on a steamer, and there met Vice-President Stephens, Honorable C. C. Clay, General Wheeler, the distinguished cavalry officer, and his adjutant, General Ralls. Burton N. Harrison, though they would not all
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 67: the tortures inflicted by General Miles. (search)
people and was succored by the good Samaritan. May 28th. Complained of the dampness of his cell, as one probable cause of his illness. The sun could never dart its influence through such masses of masonry. Surrounded as the fort was with a ditch, in which the water rose and fell from three to four feet with the tide, it was impossible to keep such places free from noxious vapors. Recurring to the subject of his family, Mr. Davis asked me had I not been called upon to attend Miss Howell, his wife's sister, who had been very ill at the time of his quitting the Clyde. Replied that Colonel James, Chief Quartermaster, had called at my quarters and requested me to visit a sick lady on board that vessel; believed it was the lady he referred to, but could not be sure of the name. Had mentioned the matter to General Miles, asking a pass to visit; but he objected, saying the orders were to allow no communication with the ship. June 1st. Except for the purpose of petty t
sis, and in one of them he lost his eye. It first came on with an attack of acute neuralgia. When he was taken from me on the ship, the provost-guard and some women detectives came on board, and after the women searched our persons, the men searched our baggage. They then told my servants that they could go ashore if they did not desire to go to Savannah. The husband of my faithful colored nurse forced her to go. I entreated to be permitted to debark at Charleston, as my sister, Miss Howell, still continued to be ill, and I feared to return on the ship with a drunken purser, who had previously required Colonel Pritchard's authority to keep him in order; and going back, Mrs. Clay, my sister, and myself would be the only women on the ship-but this was refused. Acting as my own chambermaid and nurse, and the nurse also of my sister, we started for Savannah. We had a fearful gale, in which the upper decks once or twice dipped water, and no one could walk. God protected us
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 43: visit to New Orleans and admission to Fortress Monroe. (search)
Burton, to see him wed my maid, he said, Please excuse me, I will send them as much cake and wine as you choose, but cannot receive people as guests who hold Mr. Davis a prisoner. What this judicious, capable, delicate-minded man did for us could not be computed in money, or told in words; he and his gentle wife took the sting out of many indignities offered to us in our hours of misfortune. They were both objects of affection and esteem to Mr. Davis as long as he lived. Our sister, Miss Howell, came to the fort and remained with us, much to Mr. Davis's delight. The Right Reverend Bishop Lynch, Father O'Keefe, from Norfolk, the Reverends William Brand, Barton, and Minnegerode, the latter our beloved pastor, came often to see Mr. Davis, as well as charming people from Baltimore, Richmond, Norfolk, and the surrounding country; they generally remained to dinner, and left in the evening boat; wine and delicacies of all kinds were pressed upon us by our friends. The Bishop of Mont
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 77: the Wreck of the Pacific.—the Mississippi Valley Society. (search)
e Mississippi Valley Society. In 1875 Mr. Davis began to feel old age coming on apace, and wrote to invite Captain Jefferson Davis Howell, then captain of a passenger steamer on the Pacific coast, to come to us and ease his weary shoulders of theioung hero, and pride in him and bitter grief contended in Mr. Davis's heart as long as he lived. On February 20th Captain Howell, who was temporarily out of employment, embarked on the Los Angeles with a number of passengers for Victoria. The eviff gale, the machinery of the steamer became unmanageable, and the ship commenced drifting. Seeing all the danger, Captain Howell asked for volunteers for desperate service, to relieve the ship. The second officer and four men stood forth and putd Astoria, procured relief, and saved the ship. The passengers passed resolutions, one of which was: Whereas Captain Jeff. D. Howell, by noble deeds of daring, succeeded in reaching Astoria after we had supposed he had lost his own life in the v
Arrest of Lieutenant Maffit and Jefferson Davis Howell. Portland, December 6. --Lieutenant Maffit, formerly an officer of the rebel privateer Alabama, and Jefferson Davis Howell, who came as passengers per the steamer Hibernia, were arrested in this city just as they were starting in the train for Canada this afternoon. Arrest of Lieutenant Maffit and Jefferson Davis Howell. Portland, December 6. --Lieutenant Maffit, formerly an officer of the rebel privateer Alabama, and Jefferson Davis Howell, who came as passengers per the steamer Hibernia, were arrested in this city just as they were starting in the train for Canada this afternoon.