Your search returned 28 results in 16 document sections:

1 2
ion as aide-decamp, with the rank of colonel. I cannot insist upon retaining him from such increased rank. Send somebody else. If the enemy should move by way of the Pound, I have not a sufficient force to resist them — no artillery — no intrenching tools, nor axes, spades, nor picks. If they come we will give them a fight, but this will do us no good but to destroy a few of them. I have just learned from a spy that a steamboat arrived at Piketon yesterday with supplies to the enemy. Maj. Howes wants more money; he has bought hogs, horses, wagons, &c., &c. Your obedient servant, John S. Williams, Colonel C. S. A. H. W. Chilton, A. A.-General. Account by a participant. The following description is given by a Union soldier who participated in the battle: camp “hopeless chase,” Pikesville, Pike County, Ky., Nov. 11, 1861. I take the first opportunity of writing to you that I have had since I sent my last to you. I have been in an engagement; have heard the col
s below Dam No. 5,) Dec. 22, 1861. This little hamlet is inhabited by persons engaged in the canal trade, but being; without an exception, strong Unionists, threats have been made by the enemy to destroy their habitations, causing considerable anxiety. This place is closely watched by the Indiana boys. Last night the large barn occupied by John E. Conode, but owned by Samuel Stonebreaker, of Baltimore, was fired by an incendiary, and consumed, with nearly all its contents, including six horses, five cows, several tons of hay, five hundred bushels of wheat, hogs, agricultural implements, wagons, harness, &c. Loss twelve to fifteen thousand dollars. Mr. Conode is a Unionist, and was absent from home at the time. Sharpsburg, Dec. 22 1861. Captain Howes battery of the Fourth regular artillery arrived here to-night, en route from Romney to Washington. The men are perfect war dogs in appearance, having performed the most arduous duties under General Kelly, in Western Virginia.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 80.-fight at Mississippi City, La. March 8, 1862. (search)
ompanies B and I, Massachusetts Twenty-sixth, embarked on board the Calhoun, with forty rounds of cartridges and a day's rations. Company B was commanded by Capt. E. S. Clark and First Lieut. William H. Lamson, and company I by Capt. John Pickering and First Lieut. C. E. Drew. A cutter from the Richmond, with eleven armed sailors, commanded by Master's Mate R. P. Swan, of the Vincennes, but temporarily attached to the Richmond, accompanied the Calhoun. A few officers from the Richmond, Capt. Howes, of the Black Prince, and your correspondent, were the only guests. We also had a prisoner from New-Orleans, who was to be landed at Mississippi City, and allowed to return to New-Orleans. After the embarkation of the troops a considerable delay occurred in getting up steam, so that it was half-past 3 when we got under way. In about an hour we arrived at our destination, and the draft of the Calhoun being only six feet and a half, we were able to run directly up to the wharf. As we app
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lafayette, Marie Jean Paul Roch Yves Gilbert Motier, Marquis de 1757- (search)
generals were busied assembling that militia, the Congress recalled them, sent Gates in their place, and used all possible means to support him. At that same time the great English army, of about 18,000 men, had sailed from New York, and the two Howes were uniting their forces for a secret enterprise. Rhode Island was occupied by an hostile corps; and General Clinton, who had remained at New York, was there preparing for an expedition. To be able to withstand so many various blows, General o those whose services were not accepted an indemnity for their trouble was granted. Some months afterwards M.—--drowned himself in the Schuylkill, and the loss of that impetuous and imprudent man was perhaps a fortunate circumstance. The two Howes having appeared before the capes of the Delaware, General Washington came to Philadelphia, and M. de Lafayette beheld for the first time that great man. Although he was surrounded by officers and citizens, it was impossible to mistake for a mom
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry, Chapter 6: the Chancellorsville campaign (search)
shelter. A deep ravine ran along our front, and no troops could have reached us without an exhausting climb down and up its steep sides. But we got no opportunity to fire at them, and had to be content to see our skirmishers and artillery shoot them down as long as they stood up and advanced. But farther down towards Fredericksburg they were making ground. They came out of the timber in great masses, and charged our infantry and artillery with fierce intrepidity. Here was posted General Howes division, White Cross men, among which were the Green Mountain boys, the Vermont Brigade. A portion of our line gave way down near Fredericksburg, and shortly there was the rush of hurrying battalions, with batteries on the dead run to strengthen the threatened point. The yelling and cheering of charging thousands. The continuous rattle of musketry, broken by heavy volleys, and the increasing roar of the artillery indicated deadly, desperate work. The fever of battle began to communi
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: passion flowers 1852-1858; aet. 33-39 (search)
reeze at home! While she was pouring out her heart in poem and play, and the Doctor was riding the errands of the hour and binding up the wounds of Humanity, what, it may be asked,--it was asked by anxious friends, -was becoming of the little Howes? Why, the little Howes (there were now five, Maud having been born in November, 1854) were having perhaps the most wonderful childhood that ever children had. Spite of the occasional winters spent in town, our memories centre round Green Peace;-Howes (there were now five, Maud having been born in November, 1854) were having perhaps the most wonderful childhood that ever children had. Spite of the occasional winters spent in town, our memories centre round Green Peace;--there Paradise blossomed for us. Climbing the cherry trees, picnicking on the terrace behind the house, playing in the bowlingalley, tumbling into the fishpond,--we see ourselves here and there, always merry, always vigorous and robust. We were also studying, sometimes at school, sometimes with our mother, who gave us the earliest lessons in French and music; more often, in those years, under various masters and governesses. The former were apt to be political exiles, the Doctor always havin
een highly distinguished. Hopkins, John, in 1635 res. at the northwesterly corner of Dunster and Mount Auburn streets. He rem. in 1636 to Hartford, where he was Selectman in 1640, and Juror in 1643. Hosmer, Thomas, in 1635 res. on the southerly side of Brattle Street, and in 1642 on the southerly side of Winthrop Street, between Brighton and Spring streets. He was Selectman, or Townsman, 1635, and rem. early to Hartford. Houghton, Robert, m. Sarah Phipeny 8 Sept. 1668. house, or Howes, Samuel, by w. Elizabeth, had John, b. 6 Dec. 1642, and d. 22 Ap. 1644. It is supposed that he came here from Scituate, and returned there after a few years' residence. A person of the same name was in Scituate 1634, and d. there 1661, leaving chil. Samuel, Elizabeth, and perhaps others. Hovey, Daniel, was in Ipswich 1637, and had Daniel, b. 1642; John; Thomas, b. 1648; James, killed by the Indians at Brookfield 1675; Joseph; Nathaniel, b. 20 Mar. 1657; Abigail, said to have m. Thomas
een highly distinguished. Hopkins, John, in 1635 res. at the northwesterly corner of Dunster and Mount Auburn streets. He rem. in 1636 to Hartford, where he was Selectman in 1640, and Juror in 1643. Hosmer, Thomas, in 1635 res. on the southerly side of Brattle Street, and in 1642 on the southerly side of Winthrop Street, between Brighton and Spring streets. He was Selectman, or Townsman, 1635, and rem. early to Hartford. Houghton, Robert, m. Sarah Phipeny 8 Sept. 1668. house, or Howes, Samuel, by w. Elizabeth, had John, b. 6 Dec. 1642, and d. 22 Ap. 1644. It is supposed that he came here from Scituate, and returned there after a few years' residence. A person of the same name was in Scituate 1634, and d. there 1661, leaving chil. Samuel, Elizabeth, and perhaps others. Hovey, Daniel, was in Ipswich 1637, and had Daniel, b. 1642; John; Thomas, b. 1648; James, killed by the Indians at Brookfield 1675; Joseph; Nathaniel, b. 20 Mar. 1657; Abigail, said to have m. Thomas
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing), V. Conversations in Boston. (search)
of so many of the ladies as she recollects to have met, at one or another time, at these classes. Some of them were perhaps only occasional members. The list recalls how much talent, beauty, and worth were at that time constellated here:— Mrs. George Bancroft, Mrs. Barlow, Miss Burley, Mrs. L. M. Child, Miss Mary Channing, Miss Sarah Clarke, Mrs. E. P. Clark, Miss Dorr, Mrs. Edwards, Mrs. R. W. Emerson, Mrs. Farrar, Miss S. J. Gardiner, Mrs. R. W. Hooper, Mrs. S. Hooper, Miss Haliburton, Miss Howes, Miss E. Hoar, Miss Marianne Jackson, Mrs. T. Lee, Miss Littlehale, Mrs. E. G. Loring, Mrs. Mack, Mrs. Horace Mann, Mrs. Newcomb, Mrs. Theodore Parker, Miss E. P. Peabody, Miss S. Peabody, Mrs. S. Putnam, Mrs. Phillips, Mrs. Josiah Quincy, Miss B. Randall, Mrs. Samuel Ripley, Mrs. George Ripley, Mrs. George Russell, Miss Ida Russell, Mrs. Frank Shaw, Miss Anna B. Shaw, Miss Caroline Sturgis, Miss Tuckerman, Miss Maria White, Mrs. S. G. Ward, Miss Mary Ward, Mrs. W. Whiting. In this company
A Circus Baron. --The London American announces that Messrs. Howes & Cushing's American Circus, which has been on exhibition for some time in England, will be sold on the 17th inst. Mr. Howe, who retires upon a large fortune, purposes buying a large estate upon the Rhine, upon which is a baronial castle. The title accompanying the estate will give the American circus proprietor the title of Baron Howes. A Circus Baron. --The London American announces that Messrs. Howes & Cushing's American Circus, which has been on exhibition for some time in England, will be sold on the 17th inst. Mr. Howe, who retires upon a large fortune, purposes buying a large estate upon the Rhine, upon which is a baronial castle. The title accompanying the estate will give the American circus proprietor the title of Baron Howes.
1 2