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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Passage of the falls by the fleet. (search)
y officer engaged in this undertaking, when he makes his report. I only regret that time did not enable me to get the names of all concerned. The following are the names of the most prominent persons: Lieutenant-Colonel Bailey, Acting Military Engineer, Nineteenth army corps, in charge of the work. Lieutenant-Colonel Pearcall, Assistant. Colonel Dwight, Acting Assistant Inspector-General. Lieutenant-Colonel W. B. Kinsey, One Hundred and Sixty-first New-York volunteers. Lieutenant-Colonel Hubbard, Thirtieth Maine volunteers. Major Sawtelle, Provost-Marshal, and Lieutenant Williamson, Ordnance Officer. The following were a portion of the regiments employed: Twenty-ninth Maine, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Emmerson; One Hundred and Sixteenth New-York, commanded by Colonel George M. Love; One Hundred and Sixty-first New-York, commanded by Captain Prentiss; One Hundred and Thirty-third New-York, commanded by Colonel Currie. The engineer regiment and officers of the Th
A. Smith ordered Colonel Gooding, commanding the Sixth Massachusetts cavalry, to proceed with the following troops upon a reconnoissance to the town of Campti, six miles distant, for the purpose of capturing or dislodging a band of Harrison's guerrillas, numbering some three hundred men: Three hundred of the Second New-York cavalry, two hundred from the Third Rhode Island, and one hundred men from the Eighteenth New-York cavalry, together with two regiments of infantry under command of Colonel Hubbard of the Fifth Minnesota, comprising the Thirty-fifth Iowa, Lieutenant Keeler, and the Fifth Minnesota volunteers. As our cavalry scouts advanced within a mile of the town, the rebels, who were concealed behind trees and bushes, opened a fearful and deadly fire upon them, causing many a brave fellow to writhe in the dust. Our skirmishers were at once dismounted and deployed, with the expectation of flanking the enemy. As fast as our men advanced, however, the chivalrous foe retreated,