Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Henry Hubbard or search for Henry Hubbard in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
ib. 11: 82, 91), whom even he had to denounce, forced the Mass. Abolition Society to make a shift of securing Mr. Wright's services as editor once more in June, 1841 (Lib. 11.99). He was succeeded by Leavitt as above, and the paper became the Emancipator and Free American (Lib. 11: 191, 203). In 1842 Mr. Wright, in a desperate struggle with poverty, was trying personally to find purchasers for his translation (Lib. 12: 127). Phelps is a city missionary, and on the most amicable terms with Hubbard Lib. 12.127. Winslow, George W. Blagden, et id., etc. Torrey is engaged in vilifying the old anti-slavery organization and its friends, and manufacturing political moonshine for a third party. In June, 1841, Mr. Torrey was active in forming in Boston a Vigilance Committee against kidnapping and for the prompt assistance of fugitives closely pursued by their owners (Lib. 11: 94). In December he went to Washington as a newspaper correspondent (Lib. 12: 10; Memoir of C. T. Torrey, p. 87).
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
1844. Massachusetts will at last be kicked into some degree of spirit. I don't know that anything is left for her but reprisals. Mr. Hoar himself, in a letter on the Latimer case in 1842 (ante, p. 66), referred to the law of Louisiana ordering the arrest of any colored man entering the State from another State, and asked, why, then, might not every free State imprison every incoming native of a slaveholding State (Lib. 12: 177). He reached Charleston on Nov. 28, 1844; his colleague, Henry Hubbard of Pittsfield, Mass., delegated to Louisiana, arrived in New Orleans Dec. 1, and was likewise expelled, but less fiercely (Smith's History of Pittsfield, p. 405; and Lib. 15: 2, 9, 14, 17, 25). See the law enacted by the South Carolina Legislature to prevent the recurrence of like missions: An Act to provide for the punishment of persons disturbing the peace of this State, in relation to slaves and free persons of color (Lib. 15: 14; 18: 65), and a similar one by Louisiana (Lib. 15: 17,
were disregarded in her borders, the Federal laws were subordinate or inoperative, Federal protection could have been exercised only by force and at the cost of a civil war. There could be no better occasion for weighing the value of the Union, or for taking the initiative in peaceable separation as advocated by the abolitionists. But no other class or party in the State was equal to this simple and manly procedure. Governor Briggs's messages in Lib. 15.7, 25. regard to Messrs. Hoar and Hubbard were unexceptionable in tone and temper, rhetorically considered; but they meant nothing and could effect nothing, since disunion was the only remedy. The Legislature did, indeed, pass the equally unexceptionable joint resolves prepared by Lib. 15.25, 39. Charles Francis Adams, suggesting retaliation with reference to South Carolina; but no enactment followed, nor, notoriously, could any such have been sustained in the Federal courts. The same paralysis befell the political opposition