Your search returned 55 results in 13 document sections:

1 2
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hudson, Charles 1795-1881 (search)
Hudson, Charles 1795-1881 Author; born in Marlboro, Mass., Nov. 14, 1795; became a Universalist clergyman in 1819, and was pastor at Westminster, Mass., for twenty years; was a member of Congress in 1841-49. He was the author of History of Westminster; History of Lexington; Genealogical register of Lexington families. He also prepared congressional reports, including Protective policy; Capital punishment; The northeastern boundary; and The incompetency of witnesses on account of religious belief. He died in Lexington, Mass., May 4, 1881.
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
4, $8,600.00; in 1865, $5,000.00. Total amount, $29,849.85. Lexington Incorporated March 29, 1712. Population in 1860, 2,329; in 1865, 2,223. Valuation in 1860, $1,873,634; in 1865, $1,747,459. The selectmen in 1861 and 1862 were Charles Hudson, Webster Smith, William H. Smith; in 1863 and 1864 Webster Smith, William H. Smith, Hammon Reed; in 1865, Hammon Reed, Alonzo Goddard, Eli Simonds. The town-clerk during all the years of the war was A. W. Bryant. The town-treasurer in 186he period for which they are called into service. The following gentlemen were appointed the committee: Charles Tidd, S. W. Smith, Loring S. Pierce, W. D. Phelps, C. K. Tucker, W. W. Keith, Winslow Wellington, Eli Simonds, R. W. Reed, and Charles Hudson. The committee were directed to pay ten dollars a month to single men, and fifteen dollars a month to those who have families, during active service; also suitable compensation while drilling. Lexington men who enlisted in other towns, if n
ssing Was only lifeless earth. Cheer after cheer we sent them As only Armies can,— Cheers for old Massachusetts.— Cheers for Young Michigan. They formed in line of battle, Not a man was out of place; Then with levelled steel they hurled them Straight in the rebel's face. Casualities at Fredericksburg, Dec. 11-13, 1862. killed in action or died of wounds: Co. A.Private Gilman F. Nichols,DiedDec. 11. Private Edward D. Noyes,DiedDec. 13. Private Leroy A. Nelson,DiedDec. 13. Private Charles Hudson,DiedDec. 14. Co. B.Second Lieut. Thomas Claffey,DiedDec. 13. Corporal Winfield Rappell,DiedDec. 13. Private Peter Wallace,DiedDec. 11. Private Joseph A. Guilford,DiedDec. 11. Private Conwell Merritt,DiedDec. 13. Private Joseph Seaver,DiedDec. 14. Private Daniel P. Howard,DiedDec. 15. Private Joseph W. Morrison,DiedDec. 17. Private Ezra S. Dudley,DiedDec. 13. Co. C.First Lieut. Edgar M. Newcomb,DiedDec. 20. Co. D.Private Moses C. Little,DiedDec. 11. Private Michael Redding
16, 21, 32, 34, 35, 49, 50, 77, 83, 96, 97, 99, 105, 112 Howe, John C.,............................................... 146, 286 Howe, W. C. M.,................................................... 43 Hoyt, Daniel,...................................................331, 341 Hoyt, John L.,.................................................. 248 Hoyt, William H.,.................................................. 249 Hubner, Fred W.,.................................................... 291 Hudson, Charles,....................................... 186 Hudson, Jonathan,............................... 99, 105 Hutchings, A. Frank,................................................45, 188 Hull, John,......................................................... 103 Hume, Lysander, 43, 65, 66, 88, 105, 118, 152, 180, 182, 189, 193, 200, 223, 258, 295, 299, 302,326, 332, 334, 356, 365 Humphrey, General,................................ 229, 230, 357, 360 Hunt, Philip,...............................
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 32: the annexation of Texas.—the Mexican War.—Winthrop and Sumner.—1845-1847. (search)
sed, wicked, barbarous, cruel, unnatural, unjust, and diabolical war. There were, indeed, among the Whig members some—as Hudson of Massachusetts, Corwin of Ohio, Severance of Maine, and Garrett Davis of Kentucky—who were unsparing in their condemnatugh holding Tyler and Polk responsible for the war, he was milder in his censure of the Administration than his colleague Hudson, and other associates already named, particularly in putting upon Mexico a considerable share of the blame and responsibin the Massachusetts delegation upon the war bill, May 11,—John Quincy Adams and his four colleagues, Ashmun, Grinnell, Hudson, and King. Rockwell, who was absent, would have voted, if present, against the bill. who were present, as also Senator Dm ten in the morning till nearly seven in the evening. No issue was made as to the organization or as to candidates. Charles Hudson, who had voted against the Mexican war bill in Congress, was chosen chairman, and Governor Briggs was renominated. T<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 33: the national election of 1848.—the Free Soil Party.— 1848-1849. (search)
or the continuance of slavery in four States, also for the admission of Texas and the war with Mexico. Your principles tend directly to the breaking up of this glorious republic. You and I never can meet on neutral ground. I call contemplate you only in the character of a defamer of those you profess to love, and an enemy to the permanency of this Union. Sumner was disappointed in not having the co-operation of certain public men who might have effectively aided the new movement. Charles Hudson and Governor Briggs had avowed with great earnestness antislavery sentiments, and had been strongly opposed to Taylor's nomination; but they soon came to his support, making their decision as a choice of evils. The former lost his re-election to Congress, being defeated by Charles Allen; and the latter, who explained the reasons for his decision at considerable length in a letter to Sumner, passed two years later out of political life, being defeated as a candidate for governor by the s
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley, Chapter 23: three months in Congress. (search)
tations which were addressed to him) said, Charles Hudson, Dr. Darling, and Mr. Putnam. [The exself responsible for the proof. (Addressing Mr. Hudson). Mr. Hudson will come to the stand. [GenerMr. Hudson will come to the stand. [General laughter.] Mr. Greeley. Now, if there is any gentleman who will say that he has understoords. The gentleman calls for the testimony. Mr. Hudson is the man—Dr. Darling is the man. [Memn flocked into the area. There were cries of Hudson, Hudson, down in front, and great disorder thrHudson, down in front, and great disorder throughout the House.] The Chairman again earnestly called to order; and all proceedings were arre House having become partially stilled— Mr. Hudson rose and said: I suppose it is not in order an proceed. No objection being made— Mr. Hudson said, I can say, then, that on a particular proceeded. The gentleman from Massachusetts [Mr. Hudson] simply misunderstood only one thing. He ste of which the gentleman from Massachusetts [Mr. Hudson] has spoken. Mr. G. having concluded— [2 more.
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley, Chapter 27: recently. (search)
sed forever, when a New York morning paper can be the vehicle of a single mind. Since the year 1850, when the Tribune came upon the town as a double sheet nearly twice its original size, its affairs have had a metropolitan complexity and extensiveness, and Horace Greeley has run through it only as the original stream courses its way through a river swollen and expanded by many tributaries. The quaffing traveler cannot tell, as he rises from the shore refreshed, whether he has been drinking Hudson, or Mohawk, or Moodna, or two of them mingled, or one of the hundred rivulets that trickle into the ample stream upon which fleets and palaces securely ride. Some wayfarers think they can, but they cannot; and their erroneous guesses are among the amusements of the tributary corps. Occasionally, however, the original Greeley flavor is recognizable to the dullest palate. The most important recent event in the history of the Tribune occurred in November, 1852, when, on the defeat of Gene
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died., List of Massachusetts officers and soldiers who died of wounds. (search)
, July 30, 1864. Howe, George W.,34th Mass. Inf.,– –New Market, Va., May 31, 1864. Howe, Joseph M., Corp.,15th Mass. Inf.,– –Wilderness, Va., May 12, 1864. Hoyt, Albert J.,2d Mass. Inf.,Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863.May 29, 1863. Hoyt, John L., Sergt.,19th Mass. Inf.,Gettysburg, Pa., July 3, 1863.July 5, 1863. Hubbard, George R.,57th Mass. Inf.,Petersburg, Va.,Before Petersburg, Va., July 27, 1864. Hubel, Ralph,11th Mass. Inf.,Aug. 29, 1862,Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 28, 1862. Hudson, Charles,19th Mass. Inf.,– –Falmouth, Va., Dec. 14, 1862. Hudson, Horatio,7th Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va.,May, 1864. Humphries, Walter,13th Mass. Inf.,Bethesda Church, Va.,June 2. 1864. Hunkins, Horace M.,1st Mass. H. A.,May 19, 1864,Spotsylvania, Va., May 20, 1864. Hunt, Isaiah,35th Mass. Inf.,South Mountain, Md., Sept. 14, 1862.Washington, D. C., Dec. 17, 1862. Hunt, Jared C., Corp.,10th Mass. Inf.,– –Washington, D. C., June 13, 1864. Huntington, John P.,7th Batt. Mass. L. A.–
, July 30, 1864. Howe, George W.,34th Mass. Inf.,– –New Market, Va., May 31, 1864. Howe, Joseph M., Corp.,15th Mass. Inf.,– –Wilderness, Va., May 12, 1864. Hoyt, Albert J.,2d Mass. Inf.,Chancellorsville, Va., May 3, 1863.May 29, 1863. Hoyt, John L., Sergt.,19th Mass. Inf.,Gettysburg, Pa., July 3, 1863.July 5, 1863. Hubbard, George R.,57th Mass. Inf.,Petersburg, Va.,Before Petersburg, Va., July 27, 1864. Hubel, Ralph,11th Mass. Inf.,Aug. 29, 1862,Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 28, 1862. Hudson, Charles,19th Mass. Inf.,– –Falmouth, Va., Dec. 14, 1862. Hudson, Horatio,7th Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va.,May, 1864. Humphries, Walter,13th Mass. Inf.,Bethesda Church, Va.,June 2. 1864. Hunkins, Horace M.,1st Mass. H. A.,May 19, 1864,Spotsylvania, Va., May 20, 1864. Hunt, Isaiah,35th Mass. Inf.,South Mountain, Md., Sept. 14, 1862.Washington, D. C., Dec. 17, 1862. Hunt, Jared C., Corp.,10th Mass. Inf.,– –Washington, D. C., June 13, 1864. Huntington, John P.,7th Batt. Mass. L. A.–
1 2