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John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 11 1 Browse Search
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John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 2: education (search)
et lest they lead down to ... the very gates of Hell! My fears are greatly increased by the suggestion that you expect shortly to go to the Cambridge University. When there, if you should finally take that course, hope must be at an end. I know that it ranks high as a literary institution, but the influence it exerts in a religious way is most horrible --worse even than Universalism-and in fact, in my opinion, worse than deism. Can you not give up going there and turn your attention to Hudson? I have quoted the foregoing extracts to show that the family belonged to the Orthodox Congregational Church of New England, and naturally viewed any departure from that faith as sure to lead downward. There seems to be no doubt that Charles early began to draw away from the religion of his father, and while at Cambridge, if not before, became attracted by the greater freedom of the Unitarian faith. The Cannings and the Ripleys, who were not only eloquent but liberal men of great learn
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 8: declaration of principles (search)
carried it against us, and cut the Tribune down. I don't believe it will do any permanent harm, though it must bring down the weekly to about one hundred thousand, I calculate. The saving effected by the change is some five hundred and fifty dollars a week-no trifle in these times. In addition to this, I am negotiating for a simultaneous rise to three cents by all the three papers. The Times is glad enough of the chance, and the Herald, I suppose, will come into the arrangement; at least Hudson says he is in favor of it, and when Bennett comes home, in about a fortnight, I shall push for immediate execution. The Tribune folks have agreed, and appointed me to settle it. I reckon that all three papers doing it together, neither one can suffer the slightest injury. There's no fear of any new competition; three hundred thousand dollars would scarcely suffice to create a new journal to hold its own with these three, and as for any serious decline in the demand for papers, that is stil
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 21: administration of War Department (search)
pparatus. His son, it is probable, will never recover. So far every active exertion has been soon followed by a hemorrhage from the broken artery in the top of the brain, and the number of fractures of the skull is so great that, however he may seem to regain his strength, his life must always be exceedingly faint and precarious. ... Of course you get all the common run of news from Badeau, who I suppose has not much to do except to write private letters. I notice that your old aide-de-camp Hudson In the Knoxville expedition. now wears the straps of a lieutenant-colonel. It is rather astonishing to see what an enormous crop of brigadier-generals has sprung up within the last few months. I should say that there were more officers of that rank than of any lower grade. Merritt and Custer have both gone with Sheridan, whose command embraces the States of Arkansas and Texas alone, leaving Pope to command Missouri and the Northwest, and Canby to command Louisiana, Mississippi
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 27: administration of President Hayes begins a new era (search)
ertain whether he was going to befriend in the Herald the cause or the interest for which they were endeavoring to engage his support, or whether he would tear it with his criticism or wither it with his satire. The last time I saw Mr. Bennett was in the summer of 1868, when I paid him a visit in his house at Fort Washington. He was not very well, and was no longer taking a very active part in the conduct of the Herald, which had been handed over to his son, who was still aided by Mr. Frederick Hudson, for so many years Mr. Bennett's faithful and most efficient lieutenant. I found Mr. Bennett lying on the sofa, with an immense pile of newspapers that he had just read scattered on the floor. He told me that he had them brought up to him from the Herald office every day, and that he found no other amusement so attractive as their perusal; and yet, said he, they are mostly domd fools. He got up and showed me around the place, the garden, the grounds, and pointed out every striking
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Index (search)
278, 283, 284-286, 291. Hooper, 354. Horace, quotation from, 56. Hosmer, Rev. Mr., 18. Household Book of Poetry, 54, 157, 158, 174, 175, 177, 288, 289, 501, 503. Hovey, General, 223, 246. Howard, General, 278, 285, 291, 292. Hudson, Frederick, 128, 486. Hudson, Lieutenant-Colonel, 366. Hugo, Victor, 67, 72. Human Restlessness and divine Providence, 113. Humphreys, General, 325. Hungary, 80, 81, 86, 88, 96. Hunter, General, 194, 323, 331, 336, 337, 342, 453. HuntingtHudson, Lieutenant-Colonel, 366. Hugo, Victor, 67, 72. Human Restlessness and divine Providence, 113. Humphreys, General, 325. Hungary, 80, 81, 86, 88, 96. Hunter, General, 194, 323, 331, 336, 337, 342, 453. Huntington, Susanna, 1, 2. Huntington, William Henry, 173, 175, 212, 243, 394. Hurlbut, General, 205, 225, 302. I. Icaria, 94. Indianapolis, Indiana, 276, 347. Internal revenue, 466, 467. Irish cause, 475. Irish repeal. 53. Island No.10, 191. Italy, 79-81, 88, 89. J. Jackson, city of, 209, 212, 220-223. James, A. B., 147. James, J. Russell, 311, 312, 405. James River, 327, 329, 333, 342. Japan, 132. Jasper, town of, 277-279. Jefferson, Thomas, 129, 453. Jewell, Po