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The Daily Dispatch: November 5, 1860., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 27, 1860., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 21: capture of New Orleans.--first attack on Vicksburg by Farragut's fleet and mortar flotilla.--junction of flag-officers Farragut and Davis above Vicksburg.--ram Arkansas. (search)
urke, ordinary seaman; John B. Carter, landsman, and Peter Hall, landsman, of the forward powder division; and severely scalding George B. Derwent (colored), wardroom steward, who died a few hours afterwards of the effects of his injuries, and John Hudson, master at arms, who is doing well, his wounds, though severe, not being thought dangerous. But one man from this division escaped, he being at the head of the ladder at the time. Some eight men from the forward pivot gun jumped overboard toe eight killed and one wounded: Thomas Collins, gunner's mate; Robert Sargeant, ship's cook; John Burke, ordinary seaman; William Morris, captain's cook; John B. Carlton, landsman, and George B. Derwent (colored), wardroom steward, killed; and John Hudson, master-at-arms, severely wounded; John Connor. 2d-class fireman, was drowned. On the Jackson, Alexander Green wall, seaman, was severely, if not mortally, wounded. On the 2d of July the enemy made another attack on our pickets and drove
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hudson, Henry (search)
t bears his name in the far north of the western hemisphere, and intended to winter there; but a majority of his crew became mutinous and compelled him to sail homeward. On the way his son and seven of his men who had remained faithful to him were seized by the mutineers, and, with the commander, were placed in an open shallop and abandoned on the icy sea, where, of course, they soon perished. The names of the wretched passengers in that little vessel, left to perish, were Henry Hudson, John Hudson, Arnold Ludlow, Shadrach Fanna, Philip Staffe, Thomas Woodhouse, Adam Moore, Henry King, and Michael Bute. The compassionate carpenter of the ship furnished them with a fowlingpiece, some powder and shot, some meal and an iron pot to cook it in, and a few other things. They were towed by the ship out of the ice-floes to the open sea, and then cut adrift. The fate of the castaways was revealed by one of the mutineers. England sent an expedition in search of them, but no trace could
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers, chapter 13 (search)
hael Bute, which with much ado they did. In the mean time, there were some of them that plied their work as if the ship had been entered by force, and they had free leave to pillage, breaking up chests, and rifling all places. One of them came by me, who asked me what they should do. I answered, he should make an end of what he had begun; for I saw him do nothing but shark Plunder. up and down. Now were all the poor men in the shallop, whose names are as followeth: Henry Hudson, John Hudson, Arnold Lodlo, Sidrack Faner, Philip Staffe, Thomas Woodhouse or Wydhouse, Adam Moore, Henry King, Michael Bute. The carpenter got of them a piece, A gun. and powder and shot, and some pikes, an iron pot, with some meal, and other things. They stood out of the ice, the shallop being fast to the stern of the ship; and so, when they were nigh out, for I cannot say they were clean out, they The mutinous crew, on the ship. cut her head fast from the stern of our ship, then out with
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers, Index. (search)
120, 142, 202, 280. Hakluyt's voyages, 54, 98, 142, 169, 176. Harlow, Captain, 223. Hawkins, Captain, John, 161. Heckewelder, Reverend, John, 290. Henry VII., King (of England), 57, 58. Heriulf, 3, 6. Higginson, Reverend, Francis, 341-355. Hillard, G. S., 230. Hochelaga (now Montreal), 111. Holland, Lords States-General of, 303. Hopkins, Steven, 314, 334. Howe, George, 191. Huarco, 43. Hudson, Henry, and the New Netherlands, 279-308; last voyage of, 296-303. Hudson, John, 302. Hunt, Captain, 335. Robert, 231. Huyck, Jan, 305. I. Indians, Canadian, 100, 105, 108, 111, 114. Indians, Caribbean, 21, 23, 29, 35, 39, 50. Florida, 124, 127, 144, 149, 156. Gulf of Mexico, 75, 83, 88, 91, 93. Hudson River, 283, 290. Mississippi River, 131, 135, 138. New England, 11, 65, 204, 213, 225, 320, 333, 357. Virginia, 79, 184, 192,232,237,242, 251. Boats of, 24, 65, 183. Children of, 251. Ill-treatment of, by colonists, 11, 64, 124, 188, 219, 23
Roaming about --A negro, named John Hudson, was arrested by a watchman last Friday night, and when asked for his free papers, presented to the officer a letter addressed to "Miss Laura Williams," which contained ardent wishes for her "good health," and was signed "Chris. Long." The document was not quite sufficient to prove his freedom or his honesty, and the Mayor committed Hudson to jail. A woman named Elizabeth Foster, claiming to be free, was also before the Mayor on Saturday, and orhn Hudson, was arrested by a watchman last Friday night, and when asked for his free papers, presented to the officer a letter addressed to "Miss Laura Williams," which contained ardent wishes for her "good health," and was signed "Chris. Long." The document was not quite sufficient to prove his freedom or his honesty, and the Mayor committed Hudson to jail. A woman named Elizabeth Foster, claiming to be free, was also before the Mayor on Saturday, and ordered to procure her papers forthwith.
statement of the imports of foreign dry goods at the port of New York, for last week, and since January 1st: For the week. 1858.1859.1860. entered at the port$912,933$1,510,982$1,169,249 thrown on market855,1461,352,7181,013,754 since January first. Entered at port$52,575,70999,681,73291,589,072 Thrown on market.60,282,37899,391,05291,582,944 A noticeable feature of the New York market, the Post says, is the scarcity of stocks for delivery from day to day. Erie, Hudson, Parma, and occasionally New York Central, are in scanty supply, and upon examination of the transfer books of these and several other companies, it appears that the late flurry has brought in little real stock, but, on the contrary, the current seems to have been in the opposite direction. The late pressure to sell was undoubtedly from weak parties having buyer's options. The October earnings of the New York Central Railroad, it is said, will foot up rather less than September, about
Punished. --One of those worthless free negroes who manage to get rid of their papers occasionally, John Hudson by name, was before the Mayor yesterday, and ordered ten lashes, by way of remanding him of the necessity of getting another register, and keeping it safely.