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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 2 0 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 5: military and naval operations on the coast of South Carolina.--military operations on the line of the Potomac River. (search)
ing, were on hand in the greatest abundance, and the chief commander was furnished with numerous and efficient staff officers, The following officers composed the staff of General McClellan soon after taking the command of the Army of the Potomac: Major S. Williams, Assistant Adjutant-General; Captain Albert V. Colburn, Assistant Adjutant-General; Colonel R. B. Marcy, Inspector-General; Colonel T. M. Key, Aid-de-Camp; Captain 3N. B. Sweitser, 1st Cavalry, Aid-de-Camp; Captain Edward McK. Hudson, 14th Infantry, Aid-de-Camp; Captain L A. Williams, 10th Infantry, Aid-de-Camp; Major A. J. Myer, Signal Officer; Major Stewart Van Vliet, Chief Quartermaster; Captain H. F. Clarke, Chief Commissary; Surgeon C. S. Tripler, Medical Director; Major J. G. Barnard, Chief Engineer; Major J. N. Macomb, Chief Topographical Engineer; Captain Charles P. Kingsbury, Chief of Ordnance; Brigadier-Geperal George Stoneman, Volunteer Service, Chief of Cavalry; Brlgadiergeneral W. F. Barry, Volunteer Service
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 6: the Army of the Potomac.--the Trent affair.--capture of Roanoke Island. (search)
Vaughn, Samuel woods, Henry Thielberg, Robert B. Wood, Robert Jordan, Thomas W. Hamilton, Frank Bois, Thomas Jenkins, Martin McHugh, Thomas E. Corcoran, Henry Dow, John Woon, Christ. Brennen, Edward Ringgold, James K. L. Duncan, Hugh Melloy, William P. Johnson, Bartlett Laffey, Richard Seward, Christopher Nugent, James Brown, William Moore, William P. Brownell, William Talbot, Richard Stout, George W. Leland, Horatio N. Young, Michael Huskey, John Dorman, William Farley, J. Henry Denig, Michael Hudson, William M. Smith, miles M. Oviatt, Barnett Kenna, William Halsted, Joseph Brown, Joseph Irlam, Edward Price, Alexander Mack, William Nichols, John Lawson, Martin Freeman, William Dinsmore, Adam Duncan, Charles Deakin, Cornelius Cronin, William Wells, Hendrick sharp, Walter B. Smith, George Parks, Thomas Hayes, Lebbeus Simkins, Oloff Smith, Alexander H. Truett, Robert Brown, John H. James, Thomas Cripps, John Brazell, James H. Morgan, John Smith, James B. Chandler., William Jones, Willia
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 23: siege and capture of Vicksburg and Port Hudson. (search)
s to their fortifications. On the left and center there was equal bravery; and along the whole line, at sunset, the Confederates,--who had fought gallantly, were behind the shelter of their works. The Nationals moved close up to these, and they and their antagonists held opposite sides of the parapet. The troops on the right continued to hold this position, but those on the left, exposed to a flank fire, withdrew to a belt of woods not far off. So ended the first general assault upon Port Hudson, in which many a brave man passed away. Among the slain were Colonels Clark, of the Sixth Michigan, D. S. Cowles, of the One Hundred and Twenty-eighth New York, Payne, of the Second Louisiana, and Chapin, of the Thirtieth Massachusetts. General T. W. Sherman was very seriously wounded, but finally recovered with the loss of a leg, and General Neal Dow, of Maine, was slightly wounded. Colonel Cowles, of Hudson, New York, one of the noblest men in the army, was wounded in the thickest of t
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
result of the day, I remain, etc., James Alden. Sir — In accordance with your instructions, I herewith append a list of the crew who most distinguished themselves for gallantry and good conduct during the action with Fort Morgan and the rebel rain and gun-boats. Feeling satisfied that Captain (afterwards Rear-Admiral) James Alden, U. S. N they have earned that justly-prized distinction, the medal of honor, I trust the Department will confer it upon them: J. Henry Dennig and Michael Hudson, Sergeants of Marines; Wm. M. Smith and Miles M. Oviatt, Corporals of Marines; Barnett Kenna, Quartermaster; Wm. Halsted, Coxswain; Joseph Brown, Quartermaster; Joseph Irlane, Seaman; Edward Price, Coxswain; Alexander Mack, Captain-of-Top; William Nichols, Quartermaster; Nicholas Irwin, Seaman; John Cooper, Coxswain; John Brown, Captain-of-Forecastle; John Irwin, Coxswain; William Blagden, Ship's Cook; William Madden, Coalheaver; James Machon, boy; William H. Brown, Lds.; James Mifflin,
e action with Fort Morgan and the rebel ram and gunboats. Feeling satisfied that they have earned that justly prized distinction, the medal of honor, I trust the Department will confer it upon them. J. Henry Dennig, (Sergeant of Marines,) Michael Hudson, (Sergeant of Marines,) and William M. Smith, Miles M. Oriatt, (Corporals of Marines,) for their conspicuous good conduct at their guns. Barnett Kenna, (Quartermaster,) and William Halsted, (Coxswain,) coolness, bravery, and skill in the wour especial attention to the following cases mentioned by the division officers, many of which also fell under my own observation, and to request that you will recommend them for the medal of honor: J. Henry Dennig, (Sergeant of Marines,) Michael Hudson, (Sergeant of Marines,) and William M. Smith and Miles M. Oriatt, (Corporals of Marines,) for conspicuous good conduct at their guns. Barnett Kenna, (Quartermaster,) and William Halsted, (Coxswain,) coolness, bravery, and skill in working
mouth of Red River, where they found an immense fleet of gunboats ready for the ascent. Touching the naval force, it may be well to remark that a more formidable fleet was never under single command than that now on the Western rivers, under Rear-Admiral Porter; and, it might be said also, never to less purpose. At the time of departure, the strength of the rebellion in the inland waters had been crushed. Its forts had been demolished at Henry, Donelson, Columbus, Island 10, Vicksburgh, Hudson, and New-Orleans, by the gallant Foote and Farragut, united with the army. Its fleet had been sunk by Ellet, Farragut, and Davis. All that remained to be extinguished was one insignificant fort at Gordon's Landing, and one ram and one gunboat on Red River. To meet this force, we had collected twenty powerful war-vessels of all classes, from the light draught to the heaviest monitor. Among them were the monitors Ozark, Osage, Neosho; the iron-clads Benton, Carondelet, Pittsburgh, Mound Ci