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Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 85 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 32 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 1 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 8 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 2 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 11, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Thomas B. Huger or search for Thomas B. Huger in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 18: capture of forts Jackson and St. Philip, and the surrender of New Orleans. (search)
of twin screw engines and central paddles, was unfinished, and her inactivity at the time of the fight was due to that fact. The Louisiana was commanded by Com. Charles F. McIntosh, formerly of the U. S. Navy. The McRae, commanded by Lieut. Thomas B. Huger, was a sea-going steamer, mounting six thirty-two pounders and one nine-inch shell gun. The steamer Jackson, Lieut. F. B. Renshaw, commanding, mounted two thirty-two pounders. The ram Manassas, Lieut. A. F. Warley commanding, mounteivision. Above Fort Jackson, from which she did not receive a single shot, though passing its levee within fifty yards, the Iroquois was attacked by a ram and the gun-boat McRea, both of which were driven off, and the commander of the latter (Lieut. Huger), mortally wounded. The Iroquois suffered much loss and was considerably cut up in her actions with the gun-boats and Fort St. Philip. As Farragut engaged Fort St. Philip at close quarters,the Confederate gunners were again driven to she