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The Daily Dispatch: July 26, 1861., [Electronic resource], A Federal Congressman on the fight at Bull Run. (search)
been arrested in Wilmington, N. C., and committed for trial on a charge of uttering expressions indicative of sympathy with the enemy. Lieut. S. K. Adams, of the Mobile Rifles, was murdered in Norfolk on Tuesday last by a ruffian named Claiborne Hughes. Hughes has been arrested. In Norfolk, on Wednesday, 3,000 bags of His coffee, cargo of British bars Glory, sold at auction at 10 ½½ cents. Mr. John F. Morgan, formerly one of the proprietors of the Nashu Patrick, died in Memphis ilmington, N. C., and committed for trial on a charge of uttering expressions indicative of sympathy with the enemy. Lieut. S. K. Adams, of the Mobile Rifles, was murdered in Norfolk on Tuesday last by a ruffian named Claiborne Hughes. Hughes has been arrested. In Norfolk, on Wednesday, 3,000 bags of His coffee, cargo of British bars Glory, sold at auction at 10 ½½ cents. Mr. John F. Morgan, formerly one of the proprietors of the Nashu Patrick, died in Memphis on the 30th ins
e was fired at, and one of the steamers went in pursuit. She was not captured. A large steamer was towed in the neighborhood of Newport News, on Sunday, and anchored. The Cumberland, it is thought, has gone to Boston. The case of Claiborne Hughes, who, it will be remembered, was charged with the killing of Lieutenant Adams, in an affray, came up before the Mayor for investigation. Ball was refused, and the prisoner committed for a further hearing before the Superior Court on Thursday. Hughes is very young, of fine appearance, and has borne an irreproachable character. A report reached our city on Saturday, that the Town of Hampton had been fired by the Federals, a bright light having been seen in that direction. The man Pyle, charged with writing a certain letter to Butler, at Old Point, by way of a flag of truce, has been arrested, and is now in our jail. Pyle tried to effect his escape in a small boat. Yesterday afternoon, a happy scene was witnessed
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.affairs in Norfolk. Norfolk, Va., Aug. 3d, 1861. The trial of Claiborne Hughes, charged with killing Lieut. Adams, came up again yesterday. Bail was again denied him, and he was sent on to the Superior Court, in November. The doting mother and affectionate sisters and brother of the prisoner were present; but their deep anxiety could effect nothing in his behalf. A gentleman of the Alabama Regiment, of which the deceased was a member, in representing the Commonwealth, feelingly spoke of the dear friends and relatives of Lieut. A., among whom there is deep mourning to-day. The Richmond Grays were paid off yesterday. Luna.
In the Norfolk Hustings Court, Claiborne Hughes has been remanded for final trial, for the murder of Lieut, James H. Adams, Ball refused.
in great need of clothing and money, and appeal to their friends for assistance. Their trial will not take place until next April. It is hoped that the needed help will not be delayed. The Methodist Conference commenced its session here this morning, at 9 o'clock, Dr. Wm. A. Smith presiding. Bishop Andrew is expected to arrive to-day, at 11 o'clock, by the Petersburg train. Many of the ministers arrived yesterday, and a large number are expected to-day. The trial of young Claiborne Hughes is expected to take place to-day. Judge Baker has great difficulty in impaneling a jury to try this important case, but expects to be ready to commence the examination of witnesses to-day or certainly to-morrow. On Monday afternoon, two gun-boats left Newport News with a large number of troops, proceeded about four miles up James river, and came to anchor. It is thought the troops were landed on Monday night, as the gun-boats returned to Newport News yesterday morning. It is sta
Clothing for the soldiers. Camp near Centreville., Nov. 15, 1861. Editors Dispatch. I see, from your paper, that a record has been kept of contributions of winter clothing to our army. As a part of that record, allow me to state that Messrs. Hughes. Bryan & Dameron have lately reached here, from Wilkinson county, Mississippi, with $20,000 worth of blankets, overcoats, pantaloons, shoes, socks, woolen underclothes, &c., for three companies from that county; now in the 18th and 21st Mississippi regiments. The clothing was all made up by the ladies of the county, from wool grown, spun, and woven in the county the shoes from leather tanned there, and the blankets were principally from from the private bedding of the citizens. These gentlemen came to this place direct from Lynchburg, and therefore their report was not made to her sons in Richmond. Very respectfully, A. C. Holt.