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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 33. capture of Lexington, Missouri. (search)
ll them into action. They were, however, at all times, vigilant and ready to rush upon the enemy. Shortly after entering the city on the 18th, Col. Rives, who commanded the Fourth division in the absence of Gen. Slack, led his regiment and Col. Hughes's along the river bank. to a point immediately beneath, and west of the fortifications; Gen. McBride's command, and a portion of Gen. Harris's having been ordered to reinforce him. Col. Rives, in order to cut off the enemy's means of escape, the proud distinction of always being among the bravest of the brave, immediately rushed upon and took the place. The important position thus secured was within one hundred and twenty-five yards of the enemy's intrenchments. A company from Col. Hughes's regiment then took possession of the boats, one of which was richly freighted with valuable stores. Gen. McBride's and Gen. Harris's divisions, meanwhile, gallantly stormed and occupied the bluffs immediately north of Anderson's house. The
Resolved, That in the language of our own General Butler, in this crisis, there must be no compromise, no yielding; nothing but the strong arm, until the glorious flag of the Union floats over every inch of territory that ever belonged to the United States of America. We must have the whole of this country under one government, and we have but one duty — to pour out blood and treasure, the first like water, the last like sand, until that is accomplished. Resolved, In the words of Archbishop Hughes: It only remains to see whether the Government is what it calls itself, the Government of the United States, or merely the Government of a fraction thereof, and that fraction measured out to us by Southern Commissioners, who could not show a legitimate title to the commission which they propose to execute. Resolved, That the sentiment of every true man is the sentiment of Daniel Webster: When the standard of the Union is raised and waved over my head, the standard which Washington p
river, rather than leave them as trophies for the rebels. He was wounded in the hand, though it is supposed not seriously-sufficiently so, however, to prevent him from swimming to the island, in consequence of which he was doubtless taken prisoner. Company A.--Capt. H. Harrington commanding. Killed--Privates: Thomas Bailey, Thomas Dugan--2. Wounded--Sergeant Hugh Mills, Corporal Thomas Stephton. Privates: Michael Gilligan, Daniel Ferry--4. Missing--First Lieut. Samuel Giberson, Corporal Frank Hughes. Privates: Edward Flood, Thos. James, Jeremiah McCarthy, Geo. McClellan, Daniel Devlin, Geo. Sykes, James Connor, Edward Clary, James Douglas, John Wilson--12. The four men wounded reached camp, and are now under treatment. Their injuries are not of a permanent nature, and they will doubtless be again on active duty in a few weeks. Captain Harrington conducted himself, both on the battle-field and in the retreat, with great coolness and discretion. On seeing that he must either
my host that I was a prisoner. He despatched his son secretly to inform his neighbors of the fact, and a few Home Guards of the vicinity rallied, surrounded the house, and, being admitted by me, captured the rebels. Returning to Springfield with my prisoners, I found the place abandoned by our troops, with the exception of a few stragglers from my own squadron and that of Major Zagonyi's. Doctor Melcher, the doctor in charge of those wounded left after the battle of Wilson's Creek, and Doctor Hughes, my own surgeon, were dressing the wounds of our brave men who had fallen in the conflict of the night before. Collecting those of our men left in town, I posted a guard around the town, and found that after making my picket detail I had a reserve of two men. We received a flag of truce from the enemy with as much ceremony as I could muster, and impressed the bearers with an idea that we had a large force, under the dread command of General Sigel, on the outskirts of the village. A
or being candid; but when, in reply to their inquiries, I told them that I cordially sustained the President's emancipation proclamation, they betrayed a little nervousness, but did not for a moment forget their propriety. They admitted it to be the most serious danger that has yet threatened them, but they were all hopeful that it would not be sustained in the North with sufficient unanimity to enforce it. Their conversation on this point bore a striking similarity to the speeches of Frank Hughes and Charles J. Biddle; and had you heard them converse, without seeing them, you would have supposed that I was having a friendly confab with a little knot of Pennsylvania Breckinridge politicians. Of the two, I am sure, you would have respected the rebels the most; for they are open foes, and seal their convictions with their lives, and they openly avow their greater respect for open, unqualified supporters of the war over those who oppose every war measure, profess fraternal sympathy w
M V Bruce, S W Wilson, and Martin McGinnis. Wounded: Privates W P Sountain, badly in abdomen; C G Adams, severely on head; Wm A Dupree, slightly in arm; Moses Black, slightly in arm; Captain J M Fielder, slightly in foot. Missing: Privates Clement Arnold, John Blythe, and W P Peterson, (all reported badly wounded.) Company E, (Lester Volunteers,) Captain R P Lester commanding — Killed: Corporal T A J Armstrong and Private Cullen Otwell. Wounded: Privates M M Taylor, badly in arm; A J Hughes, severely in thigh; W E Dode, severely in hand; William Rogers, one finger shot off; O P Woodliff, severely in arm; F S Light, severely in both legs; George W Light, slightly in thigh. Company F, (Johnson Grays,) Captain R P Harmon commanding.--Wounded: First Sergeant A A Jordan, badly in hand; Sergeant John M Mason, slightly in arm. Missing: Lieutenant William O Clegg, reported to be badly wounded. Company G, (Yancey Independents,) Captain T T Mounger commanding — Killed: Corporal
The Daily Dispatch: October 24, 1862., [Electronic resource], A Highly interesting Yankee account of Stuart's raid into Chambersburg — the Entrance of the rebels — their Behavior, &c. (search)
e for being candid; but when, in reply to their inquiries, I told them that I cordially sustained the President's emancipation proclamation, they betrayed a little nervousness, but did not for a moment forget their propriety. They admitted it to be the most serious danger that has yet threatened them; but they were all hopeful that it would not be sustained in the North with sufficient unanimity to enforce it. Their conversation on this point bore a striking similarity to the speeches of Frank Hughes and Charles J. Biddle, and had you heard them converse without seeing them, you would have supposed that I was having a friendly confab with a little knot of Pennsylvania Breckinridge politicians. Of the two, I am sure you would have respected the rebels the most; for they are open foes, and seal their conviction with their lives, and they openly avow their greater respect for open, unqualified supporters of war over these who oppose every war measure profess fraternal sympathy with the
Castle Thunder Items --The following parties were imprisoned on yesterday; Albert Marsh and Armistead Green, slaves of Mrs. Taylor, and Dan Brown, slave of Wm. Johnson, for acting as guides to Yankee scouts on the Peninsula; Thos. Bulger, a soldier, drunk and mutinous conduct; George Elmerson, Frank Hughes, and J. G. Hill, deserters; Miles C. Baker, a deserter from the Yankee lines at Fredericksburg; and twenty-three men from Lynchburg, consisting of stragglers and conscripts.