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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for John T. Hughes or search for John T. Hughes in all documents.

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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 60 1/2.-Gen. Schenck's defence. (search)
eported no evidence of troops in that neighborhood. It is true that some one told Gen. Schenck that some other man had heard that somebody had said that there had been 700 rebels at or near Vienna. He had no foundation on which to base even a delay of so important a move, let alone to disobey his orders. An officer, in the command of a post in the enemy's country, soon learns to appreciate wild rumors. When within a mile of the village, the train was ordered to proceed cautiously, and Major Hughes, with the General's field-glass, was placed as the lookout on the forward car. The battery being masked by bushes, was not discovered until the moment it opened fire. The train was almost instantly stopped. The General first ordered me to have the train drawn out of range. I immediately went to the platform next the engine, which was in the rear, followed by the General himself, who repeated his order after me. The engineer, who was much excited and in evident fear, stammered out th
true. Brig.-Gen. Slack's division suffered severely. He himself fell dangerously wounded at the head of his column. Of his regiment of infantry, under Col. John T. Hughes, consisting of about 650 men, 36 were killed, 76 wounded, many of them mortally, and 30 are missing. Among the killed were C. H. Bennet, adjutant of the regiment, Capt. Blackwell, and Lieut. Hughes. Col. Rives' squadron of cavalry, (dismounted,) numbering some 234 men, lost 4 killed and 8 wounded. Among the former were Lieut.-Col. Austin and Capt. Engart. Brig.-Gen. Clark was also wounded. His infantry (200 men) lost, in killed, 17, and wounded, 71. Col. Burbridge was severely w, but am now as well as ever. I have the honor to be, With great respect, yours truly, W. P. Barlow, First Lieutenant Captain G.'s Battery, M. S. G. J. T. Hughes' account. On the morning of the tenth, Gen. Lyon attacked our encampment at break of day with fourteen thousand men and eighteen pieces of artillery, ha
f his duty, Col. Ben. Brown, of Ray County, President of the Senate, a good man and true. Brig.-Gen. Slack's division suffered severely. He himself fell dangerously wounded at the head of his column. Of his regiment of infantry, under Col. John T. Hughes, consisting of about 650 men, 36 were killed, 76 wounded, many of them mortally, and 30 are missing. Among the killed were C. H. Bennet, adjutant of the regiment, Capt. Blackwell, and Lieut. Hughes. Col. Rives' squadron of cavalry, (dismoLieut. Hughes. Col. Rives' squadron of cavalry, (dismounted,) numbering some 234 men, lost 4 killed and 8 wounded. Among the former were Lieut.-Col. Austin and Capt. Engart. Brig.-Gen. Clark was also wounded. His infantry (200 men) lost, in killed, 17, and wounded, 71. Col. Burbridge was severely wounded. Capts. Farris and Halleck, and Lieut. Haskins, were killed. Gen. Clark's cavalry, together with the Windsor Guards, were under the command of Lieut.-Col. Major, who did good service. They lost 6 killed and 5 wounded. Brig.-Gen. McBride
hat is not the best, medicine being scarce. Lyon's corpse is now within one hundred yards of my tent; it was disinterred this afternoon, and to-morrow starts for St. Louis. Billy Corkery and Bob Finney are our Second and Third Lieutenants. Johnny Corkery is severely wounded, but will recover. I was wounded at Carthage by shell, but am now as well as ever. I have the honor to be, With great respect, yours truly, W. P. Barlow, First Lieutenant Captain G.'s Battery, M. S. G. J. T. Hughes' account. On the morning of the tenth, Gen. Lyon attacked our encampment at break of day with fourteen thousand men and eighteen pieces of artillery, having received large reinforcements within the last few days. The attack was made simultaneously at four different points--Gen. Lyon on the west, Siegel on the south, Sturgis on the north, and Sweeney, I think, on the east. Our encampment was taken by surprise, but in hot haste soon formed for battle. The forces engaged were about