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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for E. P. Hulce or search for E. P. Hulce in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of the monument to the Richmond Howitzers (search)
heatre the various organizations commenced forming in line preparatory to the march to Howitzer Place, and a large crowd assembled on Broad street to see the parade start. The procession moved about half-past 3 o'clock, and followed the route as printed in the Dispatch. Despite the fact that the weather was exceedingly disagreeable and a cold, drizzling rain was falling, the streets along the entire line were crowded with spectators. A detachment of twenty police under command of Captain E. P. Hulce headed the procession, and after them came Chief-Marshal Henry C. Carter and his staff. Major Carter wore a white sash, and presented a very soldierly appearance as he rode his spirited charger. By his side was Captain E. D. Starke, chief of staff, and behind these two rode the following aids: Hon. George L. Christian, Colonel G. Percy Hawes, Captain E. J. Bosher, and Captain Beauregard Lorraine. The chief of staff and aids wore red sashes. Next came the First Virginia regiment,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of the statue of General Ambrose Powell Hill at Richmond, Virginia, May 30, 1892. (search)
ns in exactly the right places. The column was, therefore, a trifle late moving. The order to forward, march! was given a few minutes before 11 o'clock. Grace street from Ninth to Fifth, the first part of the route, was literally jammed with men, women, and children, and the greatest enthusiasm prevailed when the procession started amidst the strains of inspiring music and the hurrahs of the multitude. The police, marshal and aids. A squad of mounted police under command of Captain E. P. Hulce, of the Third District, rode at the head of the line. The blue coats all wore their helmets of gray, and presented an excellent appearance. Behind these came the chief-marshal, General Harry Heth, who wore a buff sash and looked every inch a soldier as he sat erect on his prancing charger. He was followed by Colonel William H. Palmer, his chief of staff, whose sash was white. The aids, all of whom wore red sashes, were as follows: Captain W. Gordon McCabe, Petersburg; Colonel W. W