Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Hull or search for Hull in all documents.

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ght a heavy norther coming on, we were unable to do much the twenty-eighth. The night of the twenty-eighth, Captain McAllister, of the Eighth Indiana, and Captain Hull, of the Ninety-ninth Illinois, both of whom had had considerable experience in that line in the rear of Vicksburgh, with a fatigue-party from each of the regiments works. The Eighth Indiana was also moved out and ordered to lie down in the open prairie, in order to take advantage of any lodgment our advance might make. Captain Hull, of the Ninety-ninth, volunteered and accompanied the advance. The morning was bitterly cold, and our men suffered severely. Our advance moved up slowly, and already established their reputation as veterans, in the well-fought fields of Mississippi. I was greatly indebted to Captain McAllister, Eighth Indiana, and Captain Hull, Ninety-ninth Illinois, for their assistance in the digging and laying out of their rifle-pit and placing of the battery. Lieutenant Stillman, commanding Se
rebel infantry, who had two pieces of artillery. This command was absent some time on important service, and did not rejoin the main column until the following day, in front of Richmond. Not returning at the time expected, a detachment under Captain Hull, of the Second New-York, was sent out on a mission, and to find out the whereabouts of Major Hall's party. Hull ran across a superior force and had a brisk skirmish, in which he lost five men, and was forced to retire. Another party under CaHull ran across a superior force and had a brisk skirmish, in which he lost five men, and was forced to retire. Another party under Captain Plum and Lieutenant Lord was also sent off and returned in safety. The main command, just at nightfall, Monday, moved forward and during the night crossed the South-Anna River. Here the advance had a skirmish with an infantry picket near Taylorsville, and dispersed them. The men crossed, a brief halt was made to feed, when the column at daylight moved on to Richmond, before which, and within the second line of defences, a position was taken at half-past 10 o'clock the same morning. On