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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 19 3 Browse Search
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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 1: (search)
, he fastened his eyes upon me, and hardly took them off for an instant while I remained. He asked me how I had left M. de Humboldt, said that M. de Humboldt spoke of me as an old friend, but that he thought he had the advantage of me there, as he M. de Humboldt spoke of me as an old friend, but that he thought he had the advantage of me there, as he had known M. de Humboldt for three-and-thirty years, which by my looks could hardly be my case, etc., etc. He then inquired by what road I had come to Vienna, and on my telling him that it was by way of Prague, he did what everybody had told me he woM. de Humboldt for three-and-thirty years, which by my looks could hardly be my case, etc., etc. He then inquired by what road I had come to Vienna, and on my telling him that it was by way of Prague, he did what everybody had told me he would do, took a subject and talked consecutively about it. The subject he chose was Bohemia. He said no part of Europe had gained more in the course of the last twenty years than Bohemia; that good roads had been built all over the country, the comfoof the last yearns clouds. I take him to be the most consummate statesman of his sort that our time has produced. Baron Humboldt wrote to Mr. Ticknor from Sans Souci, September 8, 1837: Le Prince Metternich, que j'ai vu à Teplitz, a éte ravi des
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 3: (search)
wreath was on his temples. But everybody felt it was well placed, and a burst of applause followed which must have gratified him. He is a noble, gentle-looking old man, with an abundance of white hair flowing upon his shoulders in a very striking manner. I talked with him a good deal to-day, both before dinner and after, and found him as full of simplicity as he is of genius. He has a great deal of feeling, too, and was much moved when I spoke of meeting him twenty years ago at Mad. de Humboldt's; for she was not only one of the remarkable persons of her time, but a very important friend and patron to him when he needed friends. Wife of Wilhelm von Humboldt. See Vol. I. pp. 177, 178. December 10.—I went this morning to see the Princess Gabrielli. Whom Mr. Ticknor had known as Princess Prossedi, eldest daughter of Lucien Bonaparte, Prince of Canino. See Vol. I. p. 182. In personal appearance she is less changed than I expected to find her. In the extremely winning
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 5: (search)
he like again? We dined in the evening at the French Minister's, where everything was as tasteful and as comfortable as possible, and where we met the Belgian Minister, Count Vilain Quatorze, and his wife; the Sardinian, Count Broglia di Monbello; Mr. Abercrombie, son of the Speaker of the House of Commons; the Duke de Dino, Talleyrand's nephew and heir; and two or three other persons. . . . . Mr. Abercrombie, who was formerly at Berlin, talked about the private dislikes of Ancillon and Humboldt in a very amusing manner. On first leaving Florence for the North, Mr. and Mrs. Ticknor made a visit of one night to the Marchea Lenzoni, at her villa at Certaldo. Just before entering the last [the modern village of Certaldo], the Medici arms, over rather an imposing gateway, informed us that we had reached the villa of the Marchioness Lenzoni, who had invited us to come and pass a day with her, and see whatever remained of Boccaccio's time, all of it being on her estates. She re
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 9: (search)
y his associates, and are still, in all respects of general intercourse, his equals. What struck me most, however, was his marvellous memory. He remembered where I lodged in London in 1819, on what occasions he came to see me, and some circumstances about my attendance on the committee of the House of Commons on Education; which I had myself forgotten, till he recalled them to me. Such a memory, for such mere trifles, seems almost incredible. But Niebuhr had it; so had Scott, and so has Humboldt; four examples—including Brougham—which are remarkable enough. I doubt not that much of the success of each depended on this extraordinary memory, which holds everything in its grasp. I dined with the Geological Club, and afterwards attended a meeting of the Geological Society . . . . We sat down to table nearly thirty strong; Whewell of Cambridge, the President of the Society, in the chair, and Stokes, the witty lawyer, as its Vice-President. Among the persons present were Sedgwick and
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 12: (search)
serves. . . . . You will, I suppose, have had Ford's review in the London Quarterly for October, and that of Rossieuw de St. Hilaire in the Revue des Deux Mondes at Paris. Julius is going on vigorously with his translation at Hamburg, assisted, as he writes me, by notes from Wolf of Vienna and Huber of Berlin, and expecting to publish at New Year. Tieck writes with much kindness about it. Villemain has volunteered to me a message of approbation and thanks; and I enclose you a letter from Humboldt, found in a newspaper, of which I know nothing else, not even to whom it was addressed; but which I think you and Don Domingo del Monte will read with pleasure, for the sake of the few words in which he speaks of Prescott and myself, and for the broad view he gives—after his grand, generalizing fashion—of the progress of culture in the United States. There have been a great many notices of my History, I understand, in England and this country, which I have not seen; but I have not heard
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 15: (search)
at home, merely on the business of the Library. Consequently, he did not, as before, keep a journal of his daily experiences, and his more private correspondence also suffered in consequence of his constant occupation. In Florence he established an agency in the autumn, and attended again to its affairs in the spring. He determined, after some preliminary correspondence with an old acquaintance in Florence, Mr. Sloane, to go to the Baron von Reumont, Prussian Minister in Tuscany, whom Humboldt at Berlin had described to me as a historical writer, whose works he valued very highly, and whom he advised me strongly to visit as a person who would receive me kindly, and give me the best of literary help about Italian affairs and books, as he has lived in Italy above twenty years. Mr. Ticknor had known Baron von Reumont in Rome twenty years before, when he was attache to the legation of Baron Bunsen, and he says of him, in all sorts of ways he has turned out an invaluable friend. On
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
ouston, General S. . I. 372, 373, 374. Huber, Francois, I. 156, 157, II. 37. Huber, V. A., II. 260. Hubner, Julius, II. 329. Hudson River, visits, I. 386, II. 282. Hugel, Baron von, II. 111, 112. Hulsemann, Chevalier, II. 263. Humboldt, Baron Alexander von, I. 128, 129, 130, 134 and note, 135, 138, 145, 146, 254, 225. 257, 258 note, 263, . 498. 499, 500, 501 II 3, 4, 20 note, 260, 315, 330 and note, 332, 333, 339, 340, 341; letter from, 411; letter to, 414. Humboldt, Mad. vHumboldt, Mad. von (Wilhelm), 1.177, 178, II 59. Humboldt, Wilhelm von, II. 41L Hume, Colonel, I. 447. Hume, Joseph, II. 156, 157. Hunt, Jonathan, I. 7, 381. Hunt, Leigh, I. 292, 294. I Infantado, Duque del, I. 206. Irving, Washington, I. 291, 293, 479, 492, II. 247, 248, 256 note, 454; letter to, 245. Ischl, II. 31. Italians, The, by Mr. Bucke, rejected by a London audience, I. 291. Italinski, 1.179. Italy, visits, I. 160-184, II. 37-99, 335-353. J Jablonowski, Princess, II