hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 20 0 Browse Search
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 20 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for William Von Humboldt or search for William Von Humboldt in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 3 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 16: (search)
in Dresden, he found old and new friends, and in subsequent letters he describes his enjoyment of daily intercourse with Humboldt, Mr. Ticknor writes to Mr. Prescott, after this visit: Humboldt was much changed, as might be anticipated; for the diHumboldt was much changed, as might be anticipated; for the difference between sixty-seven and eighty-seven is always much greater than between forty-seven and sixty-seven: these being, respectively, the intervals of my acquaintance with him. But his faculties seem as active, and his pursuit of knowledge as eag morning I feel rested; but I have a good deal of work to do to-day; go at ten to see some rare Spanish books; at one to Humboldt; at five to Varnhagen; and fill the rest of the time with writing about books. To-morrow I settle accounts, pay up, ando me about our country since I have been in Europe; but I feel, on all sides, that we stand in little favor or respect. Humboldt—whom I have seen every day, or had a note from him—is, I understand, very strong in his remarks sometimes, even to Ameri
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 17: (search)
e Baron von Reumont, Prussian Minister in Tuscany, who has been in Italy twenty years,—and whom Humboldt told me he considered eminently qualified to write a history of any part of the Peninsula,—said over your letter to see if there is anything to answer, I notice with pleasure what you say of Humboldt. He is, indeed, a man worth knowing, and even more so now, than he was when I was first acquaie there. He took the same pains to enable Mr. Ticknor to see to advantage his brother, William von Humboldt's, place at Tegel. On arriving, we found the librarian of the library of Frederic II. waive us, with a similar note of detailed directions in his hand, and pleased, from reverence for Humboldt, to show the whole, exactly in the order he had appointed, and then see us to the cars to go ba of Baden, who was married three days afterwards to the beautiful and only niece of the King. Humboldt, as you know, dines with the King every day, and sits in the strangers place of honor, opposite
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
von Ihnen ins Englische übertragen (ohne Weglassen dessen was sich auf unsere gegenseitige Freundschaft bezieht) gedruckt werden konnte. Wenn Sie es fur nothwendig halten, konnten Sie zusetzen, ich hatte die Bekanntmachung selbst erbeten, weil ich so viele an mich gerichtete Briefe unbeantwortet gelassen. Translation of the above:— my dear and excellent friend,—Bonds of friendship which have their origin so far back in my family, and the affection felt for you by my brother, William von Humboldt, when you lived in Germany as a young man, seem to impose on me the very pleasant duty of giving you some sign of life,—that is to say, a renewed proof of my attachment to you, and my interest in your country, and a brief account of my labors. My physical strength declines, but it declines slowly. My steps are more uncertain in their direction, owing to a feebleness (a relaxing) of the ligaments of the knees; but I can remain standing for an hour without being fatigued. I continu