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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
John G. B. Adams, Reminiscences of the Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment 24 16 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 12 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 10 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 8 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 5 3 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 5 3 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Hume or search for Hume in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Engineering. (search)
efinition of civil engineering, embodied by Telford in the charter of the British Institution of Civil Engineers: Engineering is the art of controlling the great powers of nature for the use and convenience of man. The seed sown by Bacon was long in producing fruit. Until the laws of nature were better known, there could be no practical application of them. Towards the end of the eighteenth century a great intellectual revival took place. In literature appeared Voltaire, Rousseau, Kant, Hume, and Goethe. In pure science there came Laplace, Cavendish, Lavoisier, Linnaeus, Berzelius, Priestley, Count Rumford, James Watt, and Dr. Franklin. The last three were among the earliest to bring about a union of pure and applied science. Franklin immediately applied his discovery that frictional electricity and lightning were the same to the protection of buildings by lightning-rods. Count Rumford (whose experiments on the conversion of power into heat led to the discovery of the conserv
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Everett, Edward, 1794-1865 (search)
ions, with forever accumulating compound interest of revenge, then the world, thousands of years ago, would have been turned into an earthly hell, and the nations of the earth would have been resolved into clans of furies and demons, each forever warring with his neighbor. But it is not so; all history teaches a different lesson. The Wars of the Roses in England lasted an entire generation, from the battle of St. Albans, in 1455, to that of Bosworth Field, in 1485. Speaking of the former, Hume says: This was the first blood spilt in that fatal quarrel, which was not finished in less than a course of thirty years; which was signalized by twelve pitched battles; which opened a scene of extraordinary fierceness and cruelty; is computed to have cost the lives of eighty princes of the blood; and almost entirely annihilated the ancient nobility of England. The strong attachments which, at that time, men of the same kindred bore to each other, and the vindictive spirit which was consider
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Miller, William 1782-1849 (search)
Miller, William 1782-1849 Founder of the sect of Millerites, or Adventists (q. v.); born in Pittsfield, Mass., Feb. 5, 1782; was mainly self-taught during his leisure moments while working on a farm. At the beginning of the War of 1812 he was a recruiting officer, and later a captain in the army. During his early manhood he lead and advocated the teachings of Voltaire, Thomas Paine, and Hume. Subsequently he was converted to Christianity, and joined a Baptist church. He became a deep student of the Old Testament prophecies, which convinced him that Christ would reappear to judge the world between the years 1831 and 1844. Churches were thrown open to him everywhere, and multitudes flocked to hear his interpretation of prophecy. When the time set by Father Miller, as he was popularly called, for the second advent of Christ had expired, the majority of his followers, about 50,000, did not give up their faith in the speedy coming of the Saviour. On April 25, 1845, a convention
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sumner, Charles 1811- (search)
day of his death, as he had left it, with his mark between the leaves at the third part of Henry VI., pp. 446, 447, and his pencil had noted the passage: Would I were dead! if God's good — will were so; For what is in this world, but grief and woe? He spent the first year after leaving college in study, reading, among other things, Tacitus, Juvenal, Persius, Shakespeare, and Milton, Burton's Anatomy, Wakefield's Correspondence with Fox, Moore's Life of Byron, Butler's Reminiscences, Hume's Essays, Hallam, Robertson, and Roscoe, and making a new attempt at the mathematics. He then, rather reluctantly, chose the law as his pursuit in life. No trace can be found in his biography of any inclination towards the practice of the legal profession, or of much respect or capacity for the logic of the common law. We do not remember that he anywhere speaks with enthusiasm of great advocates, unless, like Erskine, they have rendered some service to liberty, or maintained and establish