hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
John G. B. Adams, Reminiscences of the Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment 24 16 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 14 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 12 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 10 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 8 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 5 3 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 5 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe. You can also browse the collection for Hume or search for Hume in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

is childhood and youth among the grotesque and original characters of his native town. March 26, 1882, Professor Stowe wrote the following characteristic letter to Mrs. Lewes:-- Mrs. Lewes,--I fully sympathize with you in your disgust with Hume and the professing mediums generally. Hume spent his boyhood in my father's native town, among my relatives and acquaintances, and he was a disagreeable, nasty boy. But he certainly has qualities which science has not yet explained, and some oHume spent his boyhood in my father's native town, among my relatives and acquaintances, and he was a disagreeable, nasty boy. But he certainly has qualities which science has not yet explained, and some of his doings are as real as they are strange. My interest in the subject of spiritualism arises from the fact of my own experience, more than sixty years ago, in my early childhood. I then never thought of questioning the objective reality of all I saw, and supposed that everybody else had the same experience. Of what this experience was you may gain some idea from certain passages in Oldtown folks. The same experiences continue yet, but with serious doubts as to the objectivity of the sce
ice about Byron Controversy and article for Atlantic monthly, 452; letters to H. B. S. from, 360, 409; on facts in the Byron Controversy, 456. Houghton, Mifflin & Co., celebrate H. B. S.'s seventieth birthday, 500. Houghtol, H. O., presents guests to H. B. S., on celebration of seventieth birthday, 500; address of welcome by, 501. House and home papers published, 490. Howitt, Mary, calls on H. B. S., 231. Human life, sacredness of, 193. Human nature in books and men, 328. Hume and mediums, 419. Humor of Mrs. Stowe's books, George Eliot on, 462. Husband and wife, sympathy between, 105. I. Idealism versus Realism, Lowell on, 334. Independent, New York, work for, 186; Mrs. Browning reads Mrs. Stowe in, 357. Inverary Castle, H. B. S.'s. visit to, 271. Ireland's gift to Mrs. Stowe, 248. J. Jefferson, Thomas, on slavery, 141. Jewett, John P., of Boston, publisher of Uncle Tom's Cabin, 158. K. Kansas Nebraska Bill, 255; urgency of que