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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 22, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 19, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Antietam, battle of. (search)
panned by four stone bridges. On the right of the National line were the corps of Hooker and Sumner. In the advance, and near the Antietam, General Richardson's division of Sumner's corps was posted. On a line with this was Sykes's (regular) division of Porter's corps. Farther down the stream was Burnside's corps. In front of Sumner and Hooker were batteries of 24-pounder Parrott guns. Franklin's corps and Couch's division were farther down the valley, and the divisions of Morrell and Humphrey, of Porter's corps, were approaching from Frederick. A detachment of the signal corps, under Major Myer, was on a spur of South Mountain. As McClellan prudently hesitated to attack, the Confederates put him on the defensive by opening an artillery fire upon the Nationals at dawn (Sept. 16, 1862). He was ready for response in the course of the afternoon, when Hooker crossed the Antietam with a part of his corps, commanded by Generals Ricketts, Meade, and Doubleday. Hooker at once attacke
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Delaware, (search)
ry......Aug. 8, 1831 State constitution revised by a convention of thirty delegates at Dover......Nov. 8, 1831 Wilmington made a city......1832 New Castle and Frenchtown Railroad, 16 1/2 miles long, completed......1832 Louis McLane appointed United States Secretary of State......May 29, 1833 Explosion of 5,000 lbs. of powder at Du Pont's powder-mills, Wilmington......April 18, 1847 Title to Pea Patch Island, derived from Delaware by United States and from New Jersey by James Humphrey, many years in litigation, awarded to United States by Hon. John Sargeant, referee......Jan. 15, 1848 John Middleton Clayton, of Delaware, negotiates the Clayton-Bulwer treaty with the British government......April, 1850 A new constitution framed and submitted to the people, but rejected......Oct. 11, 1853 Amendment to constitution changing day of State elections......Jan. 30, 1855 Henry Dickinson, commissioner from Mississippi, invites the State to join the Confederacy; prop
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kansas, (search)
elegates at Topeka to protest against the Missouri whiskey invasion and the original package shops ......June 23, 1890 Wilson bill, overruling the original package decision, passes Congress, receives the President's signature, and the original package shops are closed......Aug. 8, 1890 People's party, an outgrowth of the Farmers' Alliance and State Grange, convenes at Topeka and nominates John F. Willits for governor......Aug. 13, 1890 At State election the vote for governor stood: Humphrey, Republican, 115,025; Willits, People's party, 106,972......Nov. 4, 1890 W. A. Peffer (Alliance) elected United States Senator......Jan. 28, 1891 Shooting of Col. Sam Wood, pioneer free-State man, in a county seat fight in Stevens county......June 23, 1891 United States Senator Plumb dies at Washington, D. C., of apoplexy......Dec. 20, 1891 Bishop W. Perkins appointed United States Senator by the governor in place of Plumb, qualifies......Jan. 5, 1892 Bob and Emmet Dalton, J
Charles Butler, W. C. Wetmore, Hiram Ketchum, Lathrop Sturges, B. W. Bonney, Fred. Schuchardt, John J. Cisco, J. Sampson, Edward Haight, Henry Coullard, John Moncreif, Wm. H. Johnson, C. P. Leverich, Robert C. Goodhue, J. Van Buren, Joseph Battelle, C. Vanderbilt Cross, Samuel R. Betts, F. Marquand, Joseph Hoxie, Philip Hamilton, C. G. Conover, B. F. Manierre, J. H. McCunn, J. J. T. Stranahan, Henry K. Bogert, Charles King, John Stewart, James Humphrey, George F. Thomas, Wm. Jellinghaus, G. W. Burnham, Edward Minturn, W. E. Warren, Theo. Glaubensklee Samuel T. Tisdale, James G. King, Gerard Hallock, James W. Gerard, Edward Larned, W. G. Sprague, Edwds. Pierrepont, George J. Fox, Wm. H. Neilson, F. B. Spinola, Thos. Commerford, W. S. Horriman, S. W. Roosevelt, Thomas Denny, J. D. Morgan, George Jones, Henry G. Norton, Joseph P. Norris, John H. Smylie, Corn. K. Garrison, Daniel Parish, Thos. W.
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 3: Berkshire County. (search)
e hundred thousand men July 4th, a legal town-meeting was held on the 19th of July; at which it was voted that it is our bounden duty, now, henceforth, and for ever, to give our obedient, ready, and earnest response to the call; and we do respond accordingly. The selectmen were authorized to recruit volunteers, and to pay each a bounty of one hundred dollars who enlists for three years, and shall be mustered in and credited to the quota of the town. David Leavitt, Edwin Hurlbert, and Mark Humphrey were chosen to assist the selectmen in recruiting; and the treasurer was authorized to borrow forty-eight hundred dollars, to meet the expense. Another meeting was held on the 28th of August, at which it was voted to pay the same bounty to volunteers for nine months service. The treasurer was again directed to borrow money. 1863. On the 22d of August a town-meeting was held, at which it was voted to pay State aid to the families of men who may be drafted. On the 8th of December, Dr. D
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
2; in 1865, 7,981. Valuation in 1860, $3,119,993; in 1865, $3,345,349. The selectmen in 1861 were Z. L. Bicknell, James Humphrey, Allen Vining; in 1862 and 1863, Z. L. Bicknell, James Humphrey, Noah Vining; in 1864, James Humphrey, Z. L. BicknellJames Humphrey, Noah Vining; in 1864, James Humphrey, Z. L. Bicknell, Noah Vining; in 1865, James Humphrey, Z. L. Bicknell, Oliver Loud. The town-clerk during all these years was Francis Ambler. The town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864 was Gilman Burrell; in 1865, Elias Richards. 1861. The first legalJames Humphrey, Z. L. Bicknell, Noah Vining; in 1865, James Humphrey, Z. L. Bicknell, Oliver Loud. The town-clerk during all these years was Francis Ambler. The town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864 was Gilman Burrell; in 1865, Elias Richards. 1861. The first legal town-meeting to consider questions connected with the war was held on the 29th of April, at which it was voted to appropriate five thousand dollars, to be expended under the direction of the selectmen for the proper equipping of military companies, James Humphrey, Z. L. Bicknell, Oliver Loud. The town-clerk during all these years was Francis Ambler. The town-treasurer in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864 was Gilman Burrell; in 1865, Elias Richards. 1861. The first legal town-meeting to consider questions connected with the war was held on the 29th of April, at which it was voted to appropriate five thousand dollars, to be expended under the direction of the selectmen for the proper equipping of military companies, and for such other expenses as may accrue under this vote. June 11th, The selectmen were directed to give aid to the families and dependants of volunteers in the war to the amount of fifteen dollars a month for each family. 1862. March 10th, Ten
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
es of discussion were therefore largely a continuation of the preceding period. The interest temporarily manifested in industry is attested by George Logan's A letter to the citizens of Pennsylvania on the necessity of promoting agriculture, manufactures and the useful Arts (1800) and the Essay on the manufacturing interests of the United States (Philadelphia, 1804). Agricultural problems were treated by Thomas Moore in The great error of American agriculture exposed (Baltimore, 1801); James Humphrey's Gleanings on Husbandry (Philadelphia, 1803); John Roberts's The Pennsylvania farmer (Philadelphia, 1804); and, above all, by John Taylor's Arator (Georgetown, 1814) and J. S. Skinner's The American farmer (Baltimore, 1820). Colonel Taylor, of Virginia, is also to be noted for his earlier Enquiry into the principles and tendencies of certain public measures (Philadelphia, 1794) and his later Tyranny Unmasked (1822). A growing interest was now taken in statistical presentation. Worthy o
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
62 Huckleberry Finn, 17, 20 Hudson, Capt., 136 Hudson, H. N., 481, 483 Hueffer, F. M., 105 Hughes, H., 437 Hughes, John T., 144 Hughes, Rupert, 295 Hugo, Victor, 592, 595, 596, 603 Huguenots and Henry of Navarre, the, 180 Huguenots and the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes, the, 180 Hugh Wynne, 90, 91, 287 Huliet, Huliet, Boese Winten, 602 Human mind, the, 240 Humboldt, Alexander von, 185, 455, 518, 580 Hume, David, 227, 233, 250, 251 Hume, Robert, 213 Humphrey, James, 432 Humphreys, M. W., 463 n. Hunt, Leigh, 455 Hunt, William Morris, 101 Hurd, John C., 347 Hurlbut, W. J., 296 Hurwitch, M., 607, 608 Hurwitz, Israel, 604 Husik, 264 n. Hutchinson, Thomas, 426 Hutton, Laurence, 129, 272, 273 Huxley, 540 n. Hyde, W. DeW., 210, 215, 216 n. Iberville, 590 Ibsen, 293, 603 Ice pack and Tundra, 169 Ide, Simeon, 141 Idols, 423 Ignatov, David, 606 Ik Marvel. See Mitchell, D. G. Iliad, 460 Illinois (University
el of the 15th Kan. Cavalry, to be Colonel, U. S. Volunteers, by brevet, for gallant and meritorious service at the battle of Newtonia, Mo., Oct. 28, 1864, to date from Mar. 13, 1865. G. O. 67, July 16, 1867. — Brevet Colonel G. H., U. S. Volunteers, and late Lieut. Colonel of the 15th Kan. Cavalry, to be Brig. General, U. S. Volunteers, by brevet, for gallant and meritorious services at the battle of Newtonia, Mo., Oct. 28, 1864, to date from Mar. 13, 1865. G. O. 67, July 16, 1867. Humphrey, Surgeon O. M., U. S. Volunteers, to be Lieut. Colonel, U. S. Volunteers, by brevet, for faithful and meritorious services, to date from Aug. 15, 1865. G. . 65, June 22, 1867. Huntington, Assistant Surgeon D. L., U. S. Army, Colonel, Medical Director, U. S. Volunteers, to be Captain, U. S. Army, by brevet, for faithful and meritorious services during the war, to date from Mar. 13, 1865. G. O.133, Aug. 22, 1865. G. O. 71, Aug. 31, 1866. — Brevet Captain D. L., Assistant Surgeo
R. Clark, Chairman Selectmen. Williamstown. As a body, I think their improvement great. C. R. Taft, Chairman Selectmen. Woburn. They are better citizens than before. A. E. Thompson, Chairman Selectmen. Wilbraham. On the whole, I think their morals have not deteriorated, but of the two have improved. Sumner Smith, Chairman Selectmen. Weymouth. The habits of such returned soldiers are better rather than worse than they were before entering the service. James Humphrey, Chairman Selectmen. Westport. Some of them, I am positive, exhibit a decided improvement, and a few of them, who were considered a little fast before the war, are now among the most industrious and respectable of our citizens. E. P. Brownell, Chairman Selectmen. Worcester. First, among many young men, of whom I have had a personal acquaintance, serving in the army has been of immense benefit to them by giving them that discipline and respect for authority which enables th
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