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Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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April 21. The United States Circuit Court, for the middle district of Tennessee, held its first (preliminary) session, since the secession of the State, in the court-room of the capital at Nashville, Judge John Catron presiding.--Chicago Times. The Provost-Marshal's force at Richmond, Va., arrested three citizens of that place, named Jas. Humphreys, Benj. Humphreys, watchmakers, and J. T. Pritchard, formerly a clerk of G. R. Peake, all for disloyalty. The prisoners were defiant in their remarks, saying that they owed allegiance to the United States alone, etc. All three of them are Virginians by birth.--Richmond Dispatch, April 22. Gen. Milroy, at the head of a reconnoitring force, overtook the rear-guard of the rebel cavalry six miles west of the railroad, near Buffalo Gap, Augusta County, Western Virginia. They fled, rapidly pursued by the Nationals. Milroy learned that their main body stopped the previous night six miles beyond Buffalo Gap, but finding they were
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical. (search)
nassas soon had an opportunity of proving their mettle on an even greater field. During the fierce battles of the Seven Days, the Twenty-first Mississippi suffered heavily in officers and men, losing for a time the services of its colonel, Benjamin Humphreys, and its lieutenant-colonel, Brandon, disabled by wounds. The severity of his wounds kept Brandon out of the field for several months. Returning to duty as soon as able he continued to serve as lieutenant-colonel until after Gettysburg. General Barksdale was killed in that battle and Colonel Humphreys became brigadier-general, while Brandon was advanced to the rank of colonel. He led the regiment in the Chattanooga and Knoxville campaign, returning to Virginia with Longstreet. In the summer of 1864 he was promoted to brigadier-general and soon after was sent to Mississippi, where he was placed in charge of the bureau of conscription. In his own State he labored unceasingly to bring out every man needed for the service of t