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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 15 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 4 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abbot, Henry Larcom, 1831- (search)
Abbot, Henry Larcom, 1831- Military engineer; born in Beverly, Mass., Aug. 13, 1831. He was graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1854. entered the Corps of Engineers, in which he reached the rank of colonel, and was retired in 1895. In the Civil War he commanded the siege artillery of the armies operating against Richmond, designed the systems of submarine mine defences and of mortar batteries for the government, and was brevetted major-general of volunteers and brigadier-general U. S. A. After his retirement he designed the new harbor at Manitowoc, Wis., and was a member of the Technical Committee of the New Panama Canal Co. His publications include Siege artillery in the campaign against Richmond; Experiments to develop a system of submarine mines; and Physics and Hydraulics of the Mississippi, the last in co-operation with General Humphreys. He received the degree of Ll.D. from Harvard, and became a member of many scientific societies.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Algiers, (search)
t was stipulated that for the space of a year Portugal should not afford protection to the vessels of any nation against Algerine corsairs. This was for the purpose of injuring France. The pirates were immediately let loose upon commerce. David Humphreys, who had been sent to Algiers by the government of the United States to make arrangements for the release of American commerce from danger, was insulted by the Dey. Humphreys wrote, If we mean to have commerce, we must have a navy. MeanwhilHumphreys wrote, If we mean to have commerce, we must have a navy. Meanwhile the United States were compelled to pay tribute to the Dey to keep his corsairs from American commerce. From 1785 until the autumn of 1793, when Washington called the attention of Congress to the necessity of a navy, the Algerine pirates had captured fifteen American vessels and made 180 officers and seamen slaves of the most revolting kind. To redeem the survivors of these captives. and others taken more recently, the United States government paid about $1,000,000 in ransom-money. In t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barlow, Joel, 1754- (search)
ministers to revise the phraseology of Watts's hymns. He also attempted to revise the Bible in the same way. A cousin of Benedict Arnold, who would talk in doggerel rhyme, was asked by Barlow to give him a specimen of his poetic talent. Arnold looked the poet sharply in the face, and said, instantly: You've proved yourself a sinful cretur, You've murdered Watts and spiled the metre, You've tried the Word of God to alter, And for your pains deserve a halter. With Trumbull, Dwight, Humphreys, and others, Barlow published a satirical poem entitled The Anarchiad. In 1787 he published his Vision of Columbus, a poem which obtained great popularity. Visiting Europe in 1788 as agent for the Scioto Land Company, he published, in aid of the French Revolution, Advice to the privileged orders. To this he added, in 1791, a Letter to the National convention, and the Conspiracy of Kings. As deputy of the London Constitutional Society, he presented an address to the French National Conv
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chancellorsville, battle of (search)
on's column in motion towards Chancelorsville. It joined another force under General Anderson at eight o'clock in the morning, and he, in person, led the Confederates to attack the Nationals. Hooker had also disposed the latter in battle order. Aware of the peril of fighting with the Wilderness at his back, he had so disposed his army as to fight in the open country, with a communication open with the Rappahannock towards Fredericksburg. At eleven o'clock the divisions of Griffin and Humphreys, of Meade's corps, pushed out to the left, in the direction of Banks's Ford, while Sykes's division of the same corps, supported by Hancock's division, and forming the centre column, moved along a turnpike. Slocum's entire corps, with Howard's, and its batteries, massed in its rear, comprising the right column, marched along a plank road. The battle was begun about a mile in advance of the National works at Chancellorsville, by the van of the centre column and Confederate cavalry. Sykes
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Humphreys, David 1752-1818 (search)
Humphreys, David 1752-1818 Military officer; born in Derby, Conn., July 10, 1752; graduated at Yale College in 1771, and was for a short time tutor in the family of Colonel Phillipse, of Phillipse Manor, N. Y. He entered the army as captain early in the Revolutionary War, and in October, 1777, was major of a brigade. He was aide to General Putnam in 1778, David Humphreys. and early in 1780 was made aide to Washington. Having distinguished himself at Yorktown, he was made the bearer of tDavid Humphreys. and early in 1780 was made aide to Washington. Having distinguished himself at Yorktown, he was made the bearer of the captured British standards to Congress, when that body voted him an elegant sword. At the close of the war he accompanied Washington to Mount Vernon, and in July, 1784, went to France as secretary of legation to Jefferson, accompanied by Kosciuszko. In 1787 he was appointed colonel of a regiment for the Western service, but when it was reduced, in 1788, he again went to Mount Vernon, where he remained with Washington until sent as minister to Portugal in 1790. He was master of ceremonies
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 9: the beginnings of verse, 1610-1808 (search)
of the eighteenth century. Timothy Dwight. political verse. David Humphreys. Joel Barlow. John Trumbull. Tory satirists. lyric poetry.Hartford Wits were Timothy Dwight, John Trumbull, Joel Barlow, David Humphreys, Richard Alsop, Lemuel Hopkins, and Theodore Dwight, a brother Their contemporary reputation was immense. Dwight, Barlow, and Humphreys, indeed, were practical men of affairs, and all were more or lesslaboured poems, including almost all those by Dwight, Barlow, and Humphreys, are to the modern reader the least successful. Their best work,the originator. The most prolific poet of this school was Colonel David Humphreys (1753-1818), who graduated from Yale in 1771, served as aie perfection of Pope and the sweetness of his versification, says Humphreys. All his patriotic poems are the work of an experienced versifie which four of the Hartford group, Joel Barlow, John Trumbull, David Humphreys, and Lemuel Hopkins cleverly adapted their English original Th
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
64, 174 Hopkins, Dr., Samuel, 330 Hopkins, Stephen, 127, 128 Hopkinson, Francis, 122, 167, 177, 215-216 Horace, 161 Horse-Shoe Robinson, 311 Houdetot, Countess de, 199 House of fame, 176 House of night, the, 181, 183 Howard, Martin, 128, 129 Howe, Julia Ward, 223 Howe, Lord, 91, 99 Howe, Sir, William, 145, 226 Hubbard, Rev., William, 25, 27, 28, 47 Hudibras, 112, 118, 171, 172, 173, 287 Hugo, Victor, 269 Humboldt, 187 Hume, 27, 29, 91, 97, 287 Humphreys, David, 164, 169, 174 Hunt, Leigh, 242 Hunter, Governor, Richard, 215 Hunter, William, 96 Hurlbert, W. H., 230 Hutchins, 190 Hutchinson, Anne, 28 Hutchinson, Thomas, 20, 28-30, 37 n.,99, 132, 133 Hutchinson Letters, 134 Hylas and Philonous, 58 Hymn of the sea, a, 277 I Idle man, the, 240 Iliad, 11, 12 Imlay, Gilbert, 191 In a forest, 263 n. Independent journal, 148 Independent Reflector, the, i 8, 121 Indian Burying ground, the, 183 Indian capt
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
n county, S. C., October 30, 1837, being the son of Rev. David Humphreys, a Presbyterian clergyman, and Rebecca (Cunningham) Humphreys, both of whom were natives of South Carolina. Major Humphreys was reared in Anderson county and received his colleMajor Humphreys was reared in Anderson county and received his collegiate education at Centre college, of Danville, Ky., from which he graduated in 1857. He then pursued the study of law and wch he never failed to do his whole duty. As a citizen Major Humphreys took high rank in Anderson, after the war, being repeagadier-general of militia, and in 1880 major-general. Major Humphreys was married February 27, 1868, to Miss Anna Josephine n, two sons and three daughters, all of whom survive. Major Humphreys died on October 6, 1893. Mrs. Humphreys still occupiesMrs. Humphreys still occupies the old homestead in Anderson, where the major resided for so many years. The life of Major Humphreys, both military and cMajor Humphreys, both military and civil, was exemplary throughout and is well worth the emulation of youth. Colonel Isaac F. Hunt Colonel Isaac F. Hunt, o
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chapter 3: first Flights in authorship (search)
wdoin College. A modest volume of Miscellaneous Poems, selected from the United States literary Gazette, appeared in 1826,—the year after Longfellow left college,—and it furnished by far the best exhibit of the national poetry up to that time. The authors represented were Bryant, Longfellow, Percival, Dawes, Mellen, and Jones; and it certainly offered a curious contrast to that equally characteristic volume of 1794, the Columbian Muse, whose poets were Barlow, Trumbull, Freneau, Dwight, Humphreys, and a few others, not a single poem or poet being held in common by the two collections. This was, however, only a volume of extracts, but it is the bound volumes of the Gazette itself—beginning with April 1, 1824—which most impress the student of early American literature. There will always be a charm in turning over the pages where one sees, again and again, the youthful poems of Bryant and of Longfellow placed side by side and often put together on the same page, the young underg
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Index (search)
209. Hillard, George S., 168, 284. Hilliard, Gray & Co., 69. Hingham, Mass., 61. Hirm, Me., 12. Holm, Saxe, 122. Holmes, Dr., Oliver Wendell, 1, 6, 57, 68, 146, 197, 273, 285, 294; on Evangeline, 194; on Longfellow, 287. Home Circle, the, quoted, 279. Homer, 5, 235. Hook, Theodore, 10. Horace, 19, 45. Howe, Dr. Samuel G., 284. Howe family, 214. Howells, William D., 126, 198; on Kavanagh, 200. Hudson River, 132, 248. Hughes, Mr., 96. Hugo, Victor, 3, 5, Humphreys, David, 23. Hunt, Helen, 122. Huron, Lake, 209. Hyperion, 55, 112, 113, 127, 134, 137-139, 171, 175, 260, 288; new literary style in, 70; development of, 124; criticism of, 125, 126; turgid rhetoric of, 128. India, 215. Indians, 18, 79, 129,132; Longfellow's plea for, 21; Longfellow plans poem about, 207, 208. Innsbruck, 223. Interlaken, 8. Irving, Washington, 7, 18, 46, 68, 80, 89, 132, 133, 249; Longfellow imitates, 26, 27; speaks of Longfellow, 50; his Sketch Book compare