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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 8, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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trous fire from the right, left and front. The prisoners taken were yesterday on their way to this city, and were expected to reach here last night. They were but a few miles from the city late in the afternoon. They were marched by land under guard. Among others killed or wounded we have the names of the following officers: Killed-Colonel Ward, of the Fourth Florida regiment; Major William H. Palmer, of the First Virginia regiment, (and son of Mr. Wm. Palmer, of this city,) and Capt. Jack Humphreys, of the Seventeenth Virginia regiment. Wounded--Col. Corse, of the Seventeenth Virginia regiment; Col. Kemper, of the Seventh Virginia regiment, and Col. Garland, of Lynchburgh, severely. Another heavy battle took place yesterday near Barhamsville, in the county of New-Kent, but with what result was not known, as the courier who brought the intelligence to this city left at twelve o'clock. The enemy landed their forces from gunboats (twenty-four in number) at or near West-Point.
ng I sent out a train of thirty-six wagons, for the purpose of getting corn and bacon at the Waddell farm, near Village Creek, Jackson County, Ark. I sent as an escort, parts of four companies of the Ninth regiment of Illinois cavalry, under Major Humphreys. The farm is about five miles from Jacksonport, and when the train was within about half a mile of it my men were suddenly attacked by a large force of the enemy. Major Humphreys, seeing his command was too weak to cope with the rebels, seMajor Humphreys, seeing his command was too weak to cope with the rebels, sent word to me to join him as soon as possible with reenforcements. I started with two companies of Bowen's battalion, with two small howitzers. I found the train halted in the road about half a mile from the farm, and the enemy in strong force in front and shooting at my men, and occasionally exchanging shots. I removed the fence on the right and unlimbered the howitzers in the road. I then formed companies A, M, K, and C, Ninth Illinois cavalry, under Captains Burgh, Knight, Cameron and
d to a disastrous fire from the right, left, and front. The prisoners taken were yesterday on their way to this city, and were expected to reach here last night. They were but a few miles from the city late in the afternoon. They were marched by land under guard. Among those killed or wounded, we have a names of the following officers; Killed--Col. Ward of the 4th Florida regiment; Major Wm. H. Palmer, of the 1st Virginia regiment, And son of Mr. Wm. Palmer, of this city,) and Capt. Jack Humphreys, of the 17th Virginia regiment. Wounded--Col. Corse, of the 17th Virginia regiment; Col. Kemper, of the 7th Virginia regiment; and Colonel Garland, of Lynchburg severely. Another heavy battle took place yesterday, Barhamsville, in the county of New York, but with what result was not known, to the who brought the intelligence in this city left at 12 o'clock. The enemy their forces from gunboats, (twenty- is number,) at or near West Point. The number engaged on either side