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had better draw in your cavalry, so as to secure the protection of the trains. The order requiring an escort for the wagons to-night has been rescinded. A. A. Humphreys, Major-General, Chief-of-Staff. On the morning of the 6th Custer's and Devin's brigades had been severely engaged at the Furnaces before I received the above note. They had been most successful in repulsing the enemy's attacks, however, and I felt that the line taken up could be held; but the despatch from General Humphreys was alarming, so I drew all the cavalry close in toward Chancellorsville. It was found later that Hancock's left had not been turned, and the points thus abando James River, there communicating with General Butler, procuring supplies and return to this army. Your dismounted men will be left with the train here. A. A. Humphreys, Major-General, Chief-of-Staff. As soon as the above order was received I issued instructions for the concentration of the three divisions of cavalry at Al
-artillery and repeating carbines that he recoiled in confusion after the first onset; still, he seemed determined to get the place, and after reorganizing, again attacked; but the lesson of the first repulse was not without effect, and his feeble effort proved wholly fruitless. After his second failure we were left undisturbed, and at 9 A. M. I sent the following despatch to army headquarters: headquarters cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac. Cold Harbor, Va., June 1, 1864-9 A. M. Major-General Humphreys, Chief-of-Staff. General: In obedience to your instructions I am holding Cold Harbor. I have captured this morning more prisoners; they belong to three different infantry brigades. The enemy assaulted the right of my lines this morning, but were handsomely repulsed. I have been very apprehensive, but General Wright is now coming up. I built slight works for my men; the enemy came up to them, and were driven back. General Wright has, just arrived. P. H. Sheridan, Major-Ge
e over the Rivanna near that town; you will then thoroughly destroy the railroad from that point to Gordonsville, and from Gordonsville toward Hanover Junction, and to the latter point, if practicable. The chief engineer, Major Duane, will finish you a canvas pontoon-train of eight boats. The chief quartermaster will supply you with such tools, implements, and materials as you may require for the destruction of the road. Upon the completion of this duty you will rejoin this army. A. A. Humphreys, Major-General, Chief-of-Staff. After Meade's instructions reached me they were somewhat modified by General Grant, who on the same evening had received information that General Hunter, commanding the troops in West Virginia, had reached Staunton and engaged with advantage the Confederate commander, General Jones, near that place. General Grant informed me orally that he had directed Hunter to advance as far as Charlottesville, that he expected me to unite with him there, and that th
m making detachments, we should probably experience great difficulty in rejoining the army. In reply to this note, General Humphreys, chief-of-staff, informed me it was intended the Army of the Potomac should cover the Weldon road the next day, thely you with the implements and material for the destruction of railroads obtained for General Sheridan. [Signed] A. A. Humphreys, Major-General, Chief-of-Staff, and Wilson's note HEADQUARTERS cavalry forces, Mount Sinai Church, June 21, 1864-6 P. M. Major-General Humphreys, Chief-of-Staff. The instructions of the major-general commanding, of this date, are received. I shall march in obedience thereto at 2 A. M. tomorrow. Before starting I would like to know if our infantry forceseral Wilson here says. It is true that the Weldon railroad near Ream's Station was not covered by our infantry, as General Humphreys informed him it would be, but Wilson is in error when he intimates that he was assured that I would look after Hamp
the campaign should begin with the movement of Warren's corps (the Fifth) at 3 o'clock on the morning of the 29th, and Humphreys's (the Second) at 6; the rest of the infantry holding on in the trenches. The cavalry was to move in conjunction with Warren and Humphreys, and make its way out beyond our left as these corps opened the road. The night of the 28th I received the following additional instructions, the general tenor of which again disturbed me, for although I had been assured thaeneral Grant's infantry-Warren's corps-rested on the Boydton road, not far from its intersection with the Quaker road. Humphreys's corps was next to Warren; then came Ord, next Wright, and then Parke, with his right resting on the Appomattox. The moving of Warren and Humphreys to the left during the day was early discovered by General Lee. He met it by extending the right of his infantry on the White Oak road, while drawing in the cavalry of W. H. F. Lee and Rosser along the south bank of S
we desired, and the general-in-chief realized this the moment he received the first report of my situation; General Meade appreciated it too from the information he got from Captain Sheridan, en route to army headquarters with the first tidings, and sent this telegram to General Grant: headquarters of the Army of the Potomac, March 31, 1865. 9:45 P. M. Lieutenant-General Grant: Would it not be well for Warren to go down with his whole corps and smash up the force in front of Sheridan? Humphreys can hold the line to the Boydton plank-road, and the refusal along with it. Bartlett's brigade is now on the road from G. Boisseau's, running north, where it crosses Gravelly Run, he having gone down the White Oak road. Warren could go at once that way, and take the force threatening Sheridan in rear at Dinwiddie, and move on the enemy's rear with the other two. G. G. Meade, Major-General. An hour later General Grant replied in these words: headquarters armies of the United States
renchments at several points, thus materially shortening the line of investment. The night of the 1st of April, General Humphreys's corps — the Second-had extended its left toward the White Oak road, and early next morning, under instructions frp a position north of the little stream, and Miles being anxious to attack, I gave him leave, but just at this time General Humphreys came up with a request to me from General Meade to return Miles. On this request I relinquished command of the divf Hatcher's Run. After we had gone, General Grant, intending this quarter of the field to be under my control, ordered Humphreys with his other two divisions to move to the right, in toward Petersburg. This left Miles entirely unsupported, and hisn to abandon his march for Rice's Station, and to take the right-hand road at the forks, on which he was pursued by General Humphreys. The complete isolation of Ewell from Longstreet in his front and Gordon in his rear led to the battle of Sailo