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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ps well, hard by his grave, while the spirits of the two soldiers, who were faithful to cross and country, doubtless bask together in the smiles of the great Captain of our Salvation. Of strong intellect, broad culture, firm convictions, devoted patriotism, earnest piety, and evangelical spirit, Dr. Pendleton made his impress on the age in which he lived, and will be sadly missed, not only in Lexington, but in the State and land which he loved so well and served so faithfully. General B. G. Humphries, of Miss., has also joined the column which has crossed over the river to rest under the shade of the trees, leaving behind him the stainless name of a gallant soldier, a true patriot, an able statesman, a noble man. Peace to his ashes! Literary notices. The Mississippi. By Francis Vinton Greene, constituting Volume VIII, of the series of Campaigns of the Civil War, issued by Charles Scribner's Sons, has been sent us by the publishers and will be fully reviewed, by a compe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
Confederate leaders. As classmate of General R. E. Lee at West Point, his Chief of Artillery during the war, and his Pastor during his residence in Lexington, General Pendleton was closely connected with our great chieftain in life, and now sleeps well, hard by his grave, while the spirits of the two soldiers, who were faithful to cross and country, doubtless bask together in the smiles of the great Captain of our Salvation. Of strong intellect, broad culture, firm convictions, devoted patriotism, earnest piety, and evangelical spirit, Dr. Pendleton made his impress on the age in which he lived, and will be sadly missed, not only in Lexington, but in the State and land which he loved so well and served so faithfully. General B. G. Humphries, of Miss., has also joined the column which has crossed over the river to rest under the shade of the trees, leaving behind him the stainless name of a gallant soldier, a true patriot, an able statesman, a noble man. Peace to his ashes!
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 78 (search)
ecessitated the hauling of supplies by the enemy a distance of sixty miles over mountains, which placed the Federal army almost in a starving condition. But Grant, with heavy reinforcements, having in the meantime arrived and assumed command, and Longstreet having been detached to operate against Burnside in East Tennessee, For the reasons for sending General Longstreet into East Tennessee, instead of General Breckinridge, see General Bragg's letter to me of February 8, 1873. Governor Benjamin G. Humphries, at that time commanding a brigade (Barksdale's) in General Longstreet's corps, once told me in the presence of General Stephen D. Lee, at the residence of Mr. James T. Harrison, that he concurred with General Bragg in attributing the capture of Lookout Mountain by Hooker to the disobedience of orders by Longstreet. General Bragg had ordered him to occupy Sand Mountain, I think it was, with a division and hold it at all hazards. Instead of placing a division there, which would