Your search returned 32 results in 15 document sections:

1 2
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hunt, Robert (search)
Hunt, Robert First pastor of the Virginia colony; went out with Newport and the first settlers as chaplain, having been recommended by Richard Hakluyt (q. v.). He is supposed to have been a rector in Kent. He was a peace-maker amid the dissenters of the first colonists. Mr. Hunt held the first public service at Jamestown, under an awning, but soon afterwards a barn-like structure was erected for worship. In the winter of 1608 a fire burned his little library, and the next year he died. been recommended by Richard Hakluyt (q. v.). He is supposed to have been a rector in Kent. He was a peace-maker amid the dissenters of the first colonists. Mr. Hunt held the first public service at Jamestown, under an awning, but soon afterwards a barn-like structure was erected for worship. In the winter of 1608 a fire burned his little library, and the next year he died. He was succeeded for a brief season by Rev. Mr. Glover, who soon died. He had accompanied Sir Thomas Gates to Virginia.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jamestown. (search)
, in compliment to their King (James I.), they named Jamestown. They also gave his name to the river. The spot is more of an island than a peninsula, for the marshy isthmus that connects it with the mainland is often covered with water. The Rev. Robert Hunt, the pastor of the colony, preached a sermon and invoked the blessings of God upon their undertaking. Then, in the warm sunshine, and among the shadowy woods and the delicious perfume of flowers, the sound of the metal The arrival at Jat Lord Delaware, with ships, supplies, and emigrants. at the mouth of the river. All turned back and, landed at deserted Jamestown, they stood in silent prayer and thanksgiving on the shore, and then followed Rev. Mr. Buckle (who had succeeded Mr. Hunt) to the church, where he preached a sermon in the evening twilight. The congregation sang anthems of praise, and were listened to by crouching savages in the adjacent woods. In that little chapel at Jamestown Pocahontas was baptized and marrie
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Smith, John 1579-1632 (search)
unt he gave of his personal exploits was most remarkable. On his return to England, Bartholomew Gosnold persuaded Smith to engage in founding a colony in Virginia, and at the age of twenty-seven years, already Capt. John Smith (from an old print.) greatly renowned, he sailed for America, Dec. 19, 1606, with Capt. Christopher Newport, who commanded three vessels that bore 105 emigrants. He was accompanied by Gosnold, Edward Maria Wingfield (one of the London Company), George Percy, Rev. Robert Hunt, and other men of property. The voyage was by the southern route, and was long and tedious. Captain Smith's conduct on shipboard was boastful and arrogant, and quarrels with him were frequent. At the Canaries, Wingfield charged him with conspiring to usurp the government in Virginia, and make himself king. There was no head to the company at sea, for the silly King, with his love for concealment, had placed the names of the councillors in a sealed box, which was not to be opened un
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Colony of Virginia, (search)
e London Company sent three ships, under Capt. Christopher Newport, with 105 colonists, to make a settlement on Roanoke Island (q. v.). They took First settlements on the Chesapeake and Delaware. the long southern route, by way of the West Indies, and when they approached the coast of North Carolina a tempest drove them farther north into Chesapeake Early settlers. Bay, where they found good anchorage. The principal passengers were Gosnold, Edward M. Wingfield, Captain Smith, and Rev. Robert Hunt. The capes at the entrance to Chesapeake Bay Newport named Charles and Henry, in compliment to the King's two sons. Landing and resting at a pleasant point of land between the mouths of the York and James rivers, he named it Point Comfort, and, sailing up the latter stream 50 miles, the colonists landed on the left bank, May 13, 1607, and there founded a settlement and built a village, which they named Jamestown, in compliment to the King. They gave the name of James to the river.
F. W. Herschel about 1825. A hollow cylinder of glass filled with a colored liquid is soldered to a thermometer-tube blown into a ball at the upper end; being exposed alternately to the sun's rays and removed to the shade, a comparison of the differences of expansion of the liquid indicates the relative intensity of the solar radiation. The discovery of the presence of another principle, associated with the light and heat derived from the sun, seems to have been made some years ago by Mr. R. Hunt in England. Sir J. Herschel proposed to establish, as a unit for the intensity of solar heat, that value which would. in a minute of time, dissolve a thickness equal to one-millionth part of a meter of a horizontal sheet of ice, when the sun's light falls vertically upon it. This he calls an actine, and from experiments made by him at the Cape of Good Hope he determined the value of a degree on the scale of one of his actinometers to be equivalent to 6.093 actines. The actinometer
ly, pyrogallic acid, which first succeeded the use of gallic acid, as discovered by Fox Talbot, held for many years the first place in the estimation of photographers for this purpose. The use of proto-iron salts was originally recommended by Robert Hunt, in 1844, and is now universal. The use of acetic acid in the developer is to retard the too rapid precipitation of the metallic silver from the mixture of developer and nitrate on the plate; but many other substances, most of them organic, cf place to expatiate at length on chemical phenomena incidental to the use of apparatus. Purely theoretical considerations, therefore, connected with photography have been ignored in the foregoing article, and the labors of Sir John Herschel, Robert Hunt, and others, in the early days of photography, and of such men as G. Wharton Simpson, Hermann Vagel, and M. Carey Lea. have not been given the prominence they deserve and should have had in an exhaustive treatise. Without, however, going i
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers, Book XI: Captain John Smith in Virginia (A. D. 1606-1631.) (search)
on, 1631. Reprinted in Mass. Hist. Coll., 3d series, vol. III. pp. 7, 29, 30, 44. There is a memoir of Captain Smith, by G. S. Hillard, in Sparks's American Biography, vol. II. I.—Captain John Smith in Virginia. Captain Bartholomew Gosnoll, More often written Gosnold. one of the first movers of this plantation, having many years solicited many of his friends, but found small assistance, at last prevailed with some gentlemen, as Captain John Smith, Mr. Edward Maria Wingfield, Mr. Robert Hunt, and divers others, who depended Waited. a year upon his projects; but nothing could be effected, till, by their great charge and industry, it came to be apprehended by certain of the nobility, gentry, and merchants, so that his Majesty by his letters-patents gave commission for establishing councils to direct here, and to govern and to execute there. To effect this was spent another year; and by that, three ships were provided,—one of a hundred tons, another of forty, and a pinnace
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers, Book XIV: the Pilgrims at Plymouth (A. D. 1620-1621.) (search)
20. that our discoverers had with the Nausites, and of our tools that were taken out of the woods, which we willed him should be brought again: otherwise we would right ourselves. These people are ill affected towards the English by reason of one Hunt, This Captain Hunt had kidnapped Indians, and carried them to Spain as slaves. The monks of Malaga set them at liberty. a master of a ship, who deceived the people, and got them, under color of trucking with them,—twenty out of this very placCaptain Hunt had kidnapped Indians, and carried them to Spain as slaves. The monks of Malaga set them at liberty. a master of a ship, who deceived the people, and got them, under color of trucking with them,—twenty out of this very place where we inhabit, and seven men from the Nausites;—and carried them away, and sold them for slaves, like a wretched man—for twenty pound a man —that cares not what mischief he doth for his profit. Saturday, in the morning, we dismissed the savage, and gave him a knife, a bracelet, and a ring. He promised within a night or two to come again, and to bring with him some of the Massasoits, our neighbors, with such beavers' skins as they had to truck Trade. with us. Saturday and Sunda
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers, Index. (search)
Hakluyt's voyages, 54, 98, 142, 169, 176. Harlow, Captain, 223. Hawkins, Captain, John, 161. Heckewelder, Reverend, John, 290. Henry VII., King (of England), 57, 58. Heriulf, 3, 6. Higginson, Reverend, Francis, 341-355. Hillard, G. S., 230. Hochelaga (now Montreal), 111. Holland, Lords States-General of, 303. Hopkins, Steven, 314, 334. Howe, George, 191. Huarco, 43. Hudson, Henry, and the New Netherlands, 279-308; last voyage of, 296-303. Hudson, John, 302. Hunt, Captain, 335. Robert, 231. Huyck, Jan, 305. I. Indians, Canadian, 100, 105, 108, 111, 114. Indians, Caribbean, 21, 23, 29, 35, 39, 50. Florida, 124, 127, 144, 149, 156. Gulf of Mexico, 75, 83, 88, 91, 93. Hudson River, 283, 290. Mississippi River, 131, 135, 138. New England, 11, 65, 204, 213, 225, 320, 333, 357. Virginia, 79, 184, 192,232,237,242, 251. Boats of, 24, 65, 183. Children of, 251. Ill-treatment of, by colonists, 11, 64, 124, 188, 219, 234, 307, 335. Kind
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Mrs. Henrietta H. Morgan. [from the Louisville, Ky., courier Journal, September 9, 1891.] (search)
for a more than usually enfeebled condition, would probably have affected her but little. Mrs. Morgan was the daughter of Mr. John W. Hunt, of Lexington, who was one of Kentncky's most prosperous merchants, and the first man in the State to accumulate a fortune of one million dollars. At his death he left a large estate to be divided among a large family. Mr. A. D. Hunt, formerly a banker in Louisville, but later of New Orleans; Colonel Thomas H. Hunt, once a leading merchant here; Dr. Robert Hunt, formerly of Louisville, but later of New Orleans, and Frank K. Hunt, of Lexington, were her brothers. Mrs. Hanna, of Frankfort; Mrs. Strother, of St. Louis; Mrs. Reynolds, of Frankfort, were her sisters. The latter was the mother of J. W. Hunt Reynolds, the once noted turfman and horse owner. Her children numbered six sons and two daughters. One of the daughters was the wife of General A. P. Hill, of Virginia, and the other married General Basil W. Duke, of this city. Her sons w
1 2