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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 18 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz). You can also browse the collection for Henry Jackson Hunt or search for Henry Jackson Hunt in all documents.

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Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), I. First months (search)
e woods, and in the unpleasant vicinity of the enemy's picket line. However, the most of them were at last got up and viewed the troops from their uncertain positions. After which they were filled up with large quantities of meat and drink and so sent in a happy frame of mind to Washington, The Captain was a very intelligent man; but most of the rest had no character or manliness in their faces, and two or three of them seemed to me almost full-blooded Jews. . . . To-morrow This final paragraph is from a letter dated December 15. I lose my tent-mate, the phlegmatic countryman of Gustav Adolf and Charles XII. He could not get permission to remain on General Hunt's Staff and so will have the satisfaction of joining his cavalry regiment, which is hutted somewhere in the mud, near Culpeper! In his place I shall probably have Rosencrantz, another Swede, and for some time at Headquarters as A. D.C. He is a courteous man, an old campaigner, and very amusing with his broken English.
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
the assaulting column. New batteries of heavy mortars and siege guns were put in position and the whole artillery was ordered to open on the enemy's batteries, the moment the mine was blown up. The 9th Corps was arranged to make a rush to the gap, the moment the explosion took place, and then one column was to keep on, and occupy the crest beyond (the key of the whole position), and others were to look out for an attack on either flank. The hour for springing the mine was 3.30 A. M. General Hunt had been everywhere and arranged his artillery like clockwork; each chief of piece knew his distances and his directions to an inch. We were all up and horses saddled by 2.30. . . . We were to go to Burnside's Headquarters to wait — an arrangement that I regretted, as you can see nothing from there. It was near half-past 3 when we got there, and only a faint suspicion of daylight was yet to be noticed. It was an anxious time--eight thousand pounds of gunpowder to go into the air at onc
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 8 (search)
liked a door shut. They were put in a log cabin to sleep, and H----secretly opened the door at night; whereupon it came to rain and blow, and the Bulls awaked in the morning to behold their shoes and stockings sailing about the room! Really, General Hunt, to whom these creatures are usually billetted, ought to get board free from his many former guests for the rest of his life. In the evening we had a charge on the enemy under a new form, or rather a very old one, for it was after the fashiry turned out and a horse-battery. We first rode along the rear line and went into a fort there. It made quite a cortege, for, besides the Generals and their officers and orderlies, there followed Mr. Lunn in a four-horse spring waggon, with General Hunt to bear him company; for Lunn had received the horseback proposition with mild horror. So he followed in a waggon, much as Mr. Pickwick was wheeled after the shooting party, when he finally turned up in the pound. In the fort was a company o
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 9 (search)
wn. Seen him! quoth C. My dear fellow, he has done nothing but follow me round, boring me to sit for a statuette! General Hunt was telling me an anecdote of Grant, which occurred during the Mexican War and which illustrates what men may look for with about a dozen men, got round the enemy's flank and was first in the work. Somewhat after, he came to the then Lieutenant Hunt and said: Didn't you see me go first into that work the other day? Why, no, said Hunt, it so happened I did not seeHunt, it so happened I did not see you, though I don't doubt you were in first. Well, replied Grant, I was in first, and here Colonel Garland has made no mention of me! The war is nearly done; so there goes the last chance I ever shall have of military distinction! The next time, but one, that Hunt saw him, was at Culpeper, just after he was made Lieutenant-General. Well, sir! cried our Chief-of-Artillery, I am glad to find you with some chance yet left for military distinction! March 8, 1865 Yesterday, as I hinted in
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
4, 222, 293, 294; death of, 341. Hoke, Robert F., 136. Holbrooke, —, Dr., 72. Holland, Sir, Henry, 21. Holman, Silas Atherton, 316. Hood, John Bell, 296. Hooker, Joseph, 93, 114; described, 230. Humphreys, Andrew Atkinson, 36, 57, 60, 65, 68, 69, 232, 277, 316, 318, 324, 329, 345, 346, 352; 353, 356; described, 6, 73, 78, 108, 307; on horses, 8; rejoins army, 64; mystery, 76; before Petersburg, 163, 217, 234, 237; on war, 243; new command, 279, 285, 326; at races, 321. Hunt, Henry Jackson, 63, 197, 275, 277; on Grant, 313. Hutchins, Benjamin Tucker, 16. Huts for winter quarters, 60. ice, 135. Indian, picket, 242. Ingalls, Rufus, 34, 60, 163, 279. Irish, good qualities, 131, 208. James river, 158. Jericho Bridge, 122. Jeter, —, 129. Jetersville, 342, 345, 349. John, history of, 274. Johnson, Edward, 111. Johnson, —, 183. Johnston, Joseph, 102n. Joinville, Prince de, 95. Kearny, Philip, 139. Kellogg, —, 61. Kelly's Ford, 43. Kelly's ho