Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for John Hunt or search for John Hunt in all documents.

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
which comparatively few of our other towns felt. Valuation in 1860, $1,365,550; in 1865, $498,844. The selectmen in 1861 were Francis Armington, Samuel Chaffee, Allen J. Brown; in 1862, Viall Medbury, Jonathan Chaffee, George H. Carpenter; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, Zebinia W. Brown, Samuel Chaffee, Willard C. Ormsbee. The town-clerk in 1861 was Henry H. Ide; in 1862, Jonathan Chaffee; in 1863, 1864, and 1865, W. C. Ormsbee. The town-treasurer in 1861 was Thomas W. Aspinwall; in 1862, John Hunt; in 1863, Ezekiel C. Cushing; in 1864 and 1865, Ira Chaffee. 1861. A general town-meeting was held on the 1st of May, to know what action should be taken in the present crisis in regard to organizing a militia company in Seekonk. After discussion it was voted to raise one. Tristram Burgess, Esq., gave his check for one hundred dollars in aid of the enterprise; and, on motion of Mr. Burgess, it was voted that, as part of the town may soon be set off to Rhode Island, a committee be appo
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 7: Franklin County. (search)
Adin Whitaker; in 1863, J. R. Reynolds, T. H. Bartlett, Clark Stone; in 1864, J. R. Reynolds, T. H. Bartlett, N. E. Sweetser, Alonzo Fleming, Dwight Gates; in 1865, Orin Andrews, Andrew Baker, Clark Stone. The town-clerk in 1861 and 1862 was John Hunt; in 1863, J. H. Dodge; in 1864 and 1865, H. F. Brooks. The town-treasurer in 1861 and 1862 was John Hunt; in 1863, J. H. Dodge; in 1864, Clark Stone; in 1865, George Fleming. 1861. The town appropriated one thousand dollars for the payment John Hunt; in 1863, J. H. Dodge; in 1864, Clark Stone; in 1865, George Fleming. 1861. The town appropriated one thousand dollars for the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers. 1862. Sometime during this year the town voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer who shall enlist in the military service and be credited to the quota of Wendell. 1863. No action appears to have been taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, in regard to the war during this year, although recruiting went on and the payment of State aid continued. 1864. On the 11th of March the town voted to raise seven hundred and f