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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for R. P. Hunt or search for R. P. Hunt in all documents.

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tember, 1861, in orders no. 1, General Johnston assumed command of the department, and Lieutenant-Colonel W. W. MacKALLall was announced as assistant adjutant-general and chief of staff. A little later, order no. 2, as follows, was issued: orders no. 2.headquarters, Western Department, Columbus, Kentucky, September 26, 1861. The following officers are announced as the personal and departmental staff of General Albert S. Johnston, commanding, viz.: personal staff.-Aide-de-Camp: R. P. Hunt, lieutenant C. S. Army. Volunteer Aides: Colonels Robert W. Johnson, Thomas C. Reynolds, Samuel Tate; Majors George T. Howard, D. M. Haydon, and Edward W. Munford. Department of Orders.-Assistant Adjutant-Generals: Lieutenant-Colonel W. W. Mackall, Captain H. P. Brewster, First-Lieutenant N. Wickliffe (acting). Quartermaster's Department.-Principal Quartermaster: Major Albert J. Smith. Commissary Department.-Principal Commissary: Captain Thomas K. Jackson. Engineer's Corps
d before we could be in condition to make headway against the enemy. Everything was in embryo. Seizing upon the materials at hand, General Polk set himself to work to create out of it an efficient army, and to prepare his department for offensive or defensive operations, as occasion might require. Recruiting was pushed night and day; the entire country was ransacked for small-arms, and metal from which to manufacture field-ordnance; nitre-beds were opened; and, under the supervision of Colonel Hunt, ordnance-officer, arrangements for the manufacture of all kinds of ordnance material were completed. Thus did General Polk obtain a large proportion of the ordnance-supplies for his entire command. Under the management of Major Thomas Peters, quartermaster, aided by Major Anderson, and of Major J. J. Murphy, commissary, quartermaster and commissary supplies were abundantly accumulated. When it is remembered that this successful organization, not only of an army but of the departments
de.-Colonel R. G. Shaver, commanding. Seventh Arkansas Regiment, Colonel Shaver. Eighth Arkansas Regiment, Colonel W. R. Patterson. Twenty-fourth Tennessee Regiment, Colonel R. D. Allison. Ninth Arkansas Regiment, Colonel J. J. Mason. Second division. Brigadier-General Buckner, commanding. Cavalry. Kentucky Regiment, Colonel B. H. Helm. Tennessee Regiment, Major Cox. Artillery. Lyon's and Porters batteries. Infantry. First Brigade.-Colonel Hanson, commanding. Hanson's, Thompson's, Trabue's, Hunt's, and Lewis's Kentucky Regiments. Second Brigade.-Colonel Baldwin, commanding. Fourteenth Mississippi Regiment, Colonel Baldwin. Twenty-sixth Tennessee Regiment, Colonel Lillard. Third Brigade.-Colonel J. C. Brown, commanding. Third Tennessee Regiment, Colonel Brown. Twenty-third Tennessee Regiment, Colonel Martin. Eighteenth Tennessee Regiment, Colonel Palmer. reserve. Texas Regiment of Cavalry, Colonel B. F. Terry. Artillery-Harper's and Spencer's batteries. Infantry-Tennessee Regimen
e direction given to Nelson's column, which was moved toward Hamburg. General Beauregard says: About 2 P. M. the lines in advance, which had repulsed the enemy in their last fierce assault on our left and centre, received the orders to retire. This was done with uncommon steadiness, and the enemy made no attempt to follow. Before they fell back, the Kentucky Brigade, with Marmaduke's Arkansas Regiment, and Tappan's Arkansas Regiment, had a final combat with the enemy, in which Colonel Hunt led the Ninth Kentucky in a gallant but unavailing charge. Trabue, in his report, puts the fact very well when he says: The fragmentary forces of both armies had concentrated at this time around Shiloh Church, and, worn out as were our troops, the field was here successfully contested for two hours (i. e., from one until three o'clock); when, as if by mutual consent, both sides desisted from the struggle. Just as the fighting ceased, the Federals were reinforced by two fresh br