Your search returned 75 results in 15 document sections:

1 2
y the mess. In 1862, some of the Confederate privates taken at Glendale, or Frayser's Farm, were sent to Fort Warren, in Boston Harbor, then under the command of Colonel Dimick, where they remained until after the cartel had been signed. Alexander Hunter, a private in a Virginia regiment, thus speaks of the life in Fort Warren, in Johnny Reb and Billy Yank: Those were halcyon days, those days of July, 1862; light spots in a generally dark life. Our soldier prisoners, so inured to hardship, st to that perfect rest and satisfaction. As they arrived at Aiken's Landing, on the James River, they met a number of prisoners released from Fort Delaware, where conditions seem to have been quite different from those at Fort Warren. To quote Hunter again: Those prisoners that trooped slowly over the gangplank, looking like the vanguard of the Resurrection, were from Fort Delaware. Scores seemed to be ill; many were suffering from the scurvy, while all bore marks of severe treatment in thei
torpedoes were found planted, arranged with delicate explosive mechanism. Arrangements were made to use a calcium light at night. From August 19 to this date, when the three regiments serving as guards of the trenches were relieved by fresher troops, their loss aggregated ten per cent of their whole force, mainly from artillery fire. On the night of the 3d, Wagner fired steadily, and the James Island batteries now and then. Our detail at the front had George Vanderpool killed and Alexander Hunter of the same company—H—wounded. Throughout the 4th we fired at Wagner, and in the afternoon received its last shot in daylight. Captain Walker ran the sap twenty-five feet in the morning before he was compelled to cease. When the south end of Morris Island was captured, Maj. O. S. Sanford, Seventh Connecticut, was placed in charge of two hundred men to act as boat infantry. From their camp on the creek, near the Left Batteries, details from this force were sent out in boats carryin
204, 205, 227, 233, 234, 237, 238, 239, 245, 246, 248, 249, 265, 272, 286, 288, 291, 296, 297, 298, 299, 301, 302, 303, 304, 309, 310, 311, 316. Houghton, Charles, steamer, 286. Housatonic, gunboat, 187. Howard, Oliver O., 267. Howard plantation, 263. Howard, Willard, 34, 55, 91, 105, 133,135, 163, 164, 182, 202, 233, 237,248, 276, 291, 314, 317. Howe, Samuel G., 23. Howell, J. B., 158. Howland, Cornelius, 10, 11. Hoyt, Henry M., 196, 206, 216. Huguenin, T. A., 123, 218. Hunter, Alexander, 119. Hunter, David, 31, 36, 39, 43, 44, 46. Hunter, David, letter to John A. Andrew, 36. Hunter, General, steamer, 65, 66, 67, 150, 151, 152, 184. Hurlbut, George P., 236. Huron, gunboat, 60. Huts, The, S. C., 212. Hutson plantation, 263. I. I Company, 20, 38, 54, 75, 92, 145, 148, 150, 164, 188, 191, 198, 207, 234, 237, 245, 254, 261, 262, 266, 273, 276, 285, 286,291, 298, 802, 309, 310, 311, 312, 314, 317. Illinois Troops. Infantry: Thirty-Ninth, 123, 124.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
eral staff who were present during that battle, and of those officers who, belonging to other commands, kindly volunteered their services on that occasion. The intelligent zeal and activity of all these officers in transmitting orders and conveying information from one portion of the field to the other contributed largely to the success of the day. Respectfully, your obedient servant, [Signed] G. T. Beauregard, General. A high private's sketch of Sharpsburg. Paper no. 2. By Alexander Hunter. [Conclusion.] Late in the evening the column halted near Sharpsburg, a little village nestling at the bottom of the hills, a simple country hamlet, that none outside, save perhaps a postmaster, ever heard of before, and yet which in one day awoke to find itself famous, and the hills around it historic. This tiny town was a quiet, cool, still place—like the locality where Rip Van Winkle lived his days. One could almost imagine he saw the shambling figure, followed by his dog, di
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 2 (search)
A high private's sketch of Sharpsburg. Paper no. 2. By Alexander Hunter. [Conclusion.] Late in the evening the column halted near Sharpsburg, a little village nestling at the bottom of the hills, a simple country hamlet, that none outside, save perhaps a postmaster, ever heard of before, and yet which in one day awoke to find itself famous, and the hills around it historic. This tiny town was a quiet, cool, still place—like the locality where Rip Van Winkle lived his days. One could almost imagine he saw the shambling figure, followed by his dog, disappear up the far street, and from just such a casement Dame Gretchen must have fired her farewell shot at her lazy, good-for-nothing spouse. The hamlet was deserted now—more so probably than our Sweet Auburn, the loveliest village of the plain, ever was—not a soul was to be seen, the setting sun tinged the windows with its glowing rays, and made more vivid the dark background of the high hills beyond. The setting sun, ah, ma<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 2 (search)
sville Early received intelligence of the rapid advance of Hunter upon Lynchburg with a force of twenty thousand men. Proen and boys, whose age exempted them from active service. Hunter, finding himself unexpectedly confronted by Early, relinquuit, which continued with uninterrupted pertinacity, until Hunter was overtaken in the neighborhood of Salem, a small town ortook with the force at his command, after the disposal of Hunter's army. By uniting with his own corps the division of Breerior gravity of his opponents. After the dispersion of Hunter's forces, one day in preparation sufficed Early for the cough the country had been laid waste a short time before by Hunter, the genial season and fertile soil had already reproducedThroughout the march down the Valley the unsparing hand of Hunter was proclaimed by the charred ruins of the once beautiful nd the army advanced to Sharpsburg. Since the defeat of Hunter the advance of Early has been so rapid that his design to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
The toasts. Then came the toasts, as follows: The Day We Celebrate. Responded to by Comrade Surgeon Harold Snowden, surgeon Seventeenth Virginia infantry, Confederate States army. The Infantry. Colonel Edmund Berkeley, colonel Eighth Virginia infantry, Confederate States army. The Artillery. Captain K. Kemper. First South Carolina artillery, Confederate States army. The Cavalry. General William H. F. Lee. The Navy. Captain S. B. Davis. The Private Soldier. Comrade Alexander Hunter, Seventeenth Virginia infantry, Confederate States army. A number of impromptu toasts were also responded to, and the evening was enlivened by yarns of camp life that brought forth peals of laughter. The Address. The evening was closed by the reading of General Lee's Farewell Address to the army by Comrade Richard M. Latham. Norfolk. Soon after sunrise flags and bunting were fluttering in the breeze from public and prominent private buildings. The day was observed as
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 9 (search)
alley, with instructions to capture or destroy the army of Hunter, a recreant Virginian, who was marching in the direction om, who was in command of the whole cavalry in the valley. Hunter was in camp near the city of Lynchburg. In a letter to meis time he (Ramseur) and I reconnoiterd the right flank of Hunter's army and found it could be most advantageously assailed,ion had arrived from Richmond. The opportunity to destroy Hunter's army was then lost. Hunter took council of his fears anHunter took council of his fears and advantage of the cover of night and darkness to make a hasty retreat. Early on the morning of the 19th we commenced a purd drove it through the place. It was now ascertained that Hunter had not taken the route that we anticipated, but had retren from which to successfully assail him the following day. Hunter, by our failure to promptly pursue at daylight, made his eo a test of strength, he began to think him no better than Hunter, and entertained more contempt for than fear of him. He se
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 31 (search)
he war. [from the Baltimore (Md.) sun, July 11, 1890.] How General Hunter executed to the letter General Grant's memorable Order—Valuablef her father's home near Lexington, Virginia, in June, 1864, by General Hunter, upon the order of General Grant. Mrs. Showell says: Lexiernor Letcher had been warned by an ante-bellum friend, a member of Hunter's brigade, to make his escape. A large reward had been offered forith no other warning of any kind, delivered a verbal order from General Hunter, in General Grant's name, for the destruction of the place and . Showell says: When the division of the Union Army under General Hunter passed through the Valley of Virginia it left a record like thebefore the Israelites, indicating the favor of God, followed behind Hunter's division, typifying the vengeance of man and the unbridled animosengeance and ruthless destruction of the one. Down the Valley came Hunter's army, and woe and loss and pitiful despair followed everywhere in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.1 (search)
e was now a leader in the movement that looked toward peace with the United States, but the legal power of ending the war had been put by the Confederate Constitution into the hands of the President. Governor Graham was not among the confidential friends of President Davis, but worked through others, and had in this way a hand in setting on foot the Hampton Roads Conference. He was not a member of this Conference, but was President pro tem. of the Confederate Senate during the absence of Mr. Hunter on that mission. After the failure of the Conference Governor Graham gave notice in the Confederate Senate that he would soon introduce a resolution in favor of opening negotiations with the United States upon the basis of a return to the Union by the States of the Confederacy. But the notice was not favorably received, and the Confederacy went down to its doom. When the crash came he was the same calm, conservative statesman that he had ever been, and was chosen by Governor Vance to
1 2