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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 245 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 164 2 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 115 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 113 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 108 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 79 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 60 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 53 7 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 48 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 47 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., McDowell's advance to Bull Run. (search)
s (Keyes's, Schenek's, W. T. Sherman's, and Richardson's); Hunter's Second Division, containing 2 brigades (Andrew Porter's In making the flank movement the Union troops, under Generals Hunter and Heintzelman, crossed this ford, followed later in urning column. As soon as Tyler's troops cleared the way, Hunter's Second Division, followed by Heintzelman's Third Divisios start was so late and his advance was so slow as to hold Hunter and Heintzelman 2 or 3 hours on the mile or two of the turomptly formed line of battle and attacked about 9:45 A. M. Hunter, the division commander, who was at the head of Burnside's that made the attack upon him. Andrew Porter's brigade of Hunter's division followed Burnside closely and came to his suppoantry, though he admitted that by the plan of battle, when Hunter and Heintzelman had attacked the enemy in the vicinity of a ford above the Stone Bridge, going to the assistance of Hunter. Sherman reported to McDowell on the field and joined in
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing armies at the first Bull Run. (search)
ol. H. W. Peck E, 3d U. S. Arty., Capt. R. B. Ayres. Brigade loss: k, 107; w, 205; m, 293 = 605. Fourth Brigade, Col. Israel B. Richardson 1st Mass., Col. Robert Cowdin 12th N. Y., Col. Ezra L. Walrath 2d Mich., Major A. W. Williams 3d Mich., Col. Daniel McConnell G, 1st U. S. Arty., Lieut. John Edwards M, 2d U. S. Arty., Capt. Henry J. Hunt. This brigade was only slightly engaged in front of Blackburn's Ford, with the loss of one officer killed. Second division Col. D. Hunter (w) Col. Andrew Porter. Staff loss: w, 1; m, 1=2. First Brigade, Col. Andrew Porter 8th N. Y. (militia), Col. Geo. Lyons 14th N. Y. (militia), Col. A. M. Wood (w and c), Lieut.-Col. E. B. Fowler 27th N. Y., Col. H. W. Slocum (w), Major J. J. Bartlett Battalion U. S. Infantry, Major George Sykes Battalion U. S. Marines, Major J. G. Reynolds Battalion U. S. Cavalry, Major I. N. Palmer D, 5th U. S. Arty., Capt. Charles Griffin Brigade loss: k, 86; w, 177; m, 2
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first year of the War in Missouri. (search)
ster, and that he would not endanger his own army by going to his assistance; and that as for musket-caps, he had none to spare. General John C. Fremont, who had assumed command of the Union armies in the West on the 25th of July, Major-General David Hunter. From a photograph. now began to concentrate his forces against Price. Sending about 40,000 men, with 100 pieces of artillery, to attack him in front, and others to cut off his retreat, he took the field himself. His plan was magnifit them safely over. After crossing the Osage, Price marched quickly to Neosho, where the General Assembly had been summoned by Governor Jackson to meet. Fremont continued to follow till the 2d of November, when he was superseded by Major-General David Hunter, who immediately stopped the pursuit and turned the army back to St. Louis. On the 19th of November Major-General Halleck assumed command of the Federal Department. When I returned from Richmond, Price had gone into winter quarters
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., In command in Missouri. (search)
t which removed me from my command. This order had been hurried forward by General Hunter, who superseded me, and who was behind with his division. The next day, HuHunter not arriving, the plan of battle was agreed on, the divisions were assigned conformably, and in the evening the troops began to occupy their positions. About 10 o'clock at night Hunter arrived at my headquarters, where the officers were assembled. I handed to him the plan of battle and turned over my command. The order which gave my command to General Hunter was dated October 24th, and had been sent to one of my subordinate officers in St. Louis, to be served on me at his discretiot. From a steel plate in possession of Sirs. Fremont. positive knowledge, General Hunter assumed that there was no enemy near and no battle possible, and withdrew t selected by General Price and myself Official Records, III., 748.-J. C. F. Hunter's withdrawal was in pursuance of instructions of a general nature from Presiden
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Pea Ridge campaign. (search)
ion of things when the intended operations of General Fremont were cut short by his removal from the command of the army (November 2d), his successor being General David Hunter. The result of this change was an immediate and uncommonly hasty retreat of our army in a northerly and easterly direction, to Sedalia on the 9th, and to rsed. Toward the end of December, 1861, when not fully restored from a severe illness, I was directed by General Halleck (who, on November 9th, had succeeded General Hunter, the command now being called the Department of the Missouri) to proceed to Rolla, to take command of the troops encamped there, including my own division (thul Garden City of the South-west looked desolate and bleak; most of the houses were empty, as the Union families had followed us to Rolla after the retreat of General Hunter in November, 1861, and the secessionists had mostly followed Price. The streets, formerly lined with the finest shade trees, were bereft of their ornament, a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 14.53 (search)
d Forrest did not fire, the enemy being out of range; but the small battery between Pork Point and Weir's Point fired an occasional gun during the day. Toward 4 o'clock in the afternoon a shot or shell struck the hurricane-deck of the Curlew [Captain Hunter] in its descent, and went through her decks and bottom as though they had been made of paper. Hunter put his vessel ashore, immediately in front of Fort Forrest, completely masking its guns, and we could not fire her for fear of burning up tHunter put his vessel ashore, immediately in front of Fort Forrest, completely masking its guns, and we could not fire her for fear of burning up the battery, which, as I have said, was built on an old canal-boat. . . . We, in the Beaufort, did our best in maintaining our position. About 4 P. M. I observed that the enemy's troops were landing to the southward of Pork Point, under the guns of a division of their fleet, and could not perceive that any successful resistance was being made to it. A little after sunset the firing ceased on both sides, and as we felt sure the enemy would not attempt to pass the obstructions by night, as he had
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The battle of Beverly ford. (search)
e fierce engagement between Sheridan and Wade Hampton at Trevilian a drawn battle. It was fought in a densely-wooded country, very remote from our main army and from any base of supply. The object of our expedition was to effect a junction with Hunter near Gordonsville; but Hunter was not at Gordonsville, nor near there, when we reached Trevilian Station, and no tidings could be had of him. He was over the hills and far away, marching directly from us instead of to a junction with us, and as wHunter was not at Gordonsville, nor near there, when we reached Trevilian Station, and no tidings could be had of him. He was over the hills and far away, marching directly from us instead of to a junction with us, and as we had no plans independent of him, we had no alternative but to rejoin the Army of the Potomac when he could not be found. A crow could scarcely find subsistence in the country about Trevilian Station; we were encumbered, after two days hard fighting, with many wounded and prisoners; we were far from our base, with ammunition and rations nearly expended. We voluntarily withdrew from Hampton's front, and withdrew at night as a matter of common discretion; but we remained within easy reach of hi
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Fire, sword, and the halter. (search)
w every road, and almost every farm over which Hunter would pass. I did not, therefore, hesitate todered me to place my cavalry close in front of Hunter during the night, as we knew he would camp at position during the night about two miles from Hunter's outposts. He began his march about daybreak for several days, and he must therefore fight Hunter as quickly as possible, and beat him back befooff without further molestation. The next day Hunter proceeded to Staunton, only eleven miles from Duffie, who recrossed the mountains and joined Hunter at Lexington. On his march from Staunton to Lss wife and daughters. From Brownsburg General Hunter proceeded to Lexington, encountering only hour, and told her that he was directed by General Hunter to assure her that the house would not be rted, and generally believed on our side, that Hunter was, himself, in so much alarm for his personang narrative by citing a few more instances of Hunter's incendiarism in the Lower Valley. It seems [37 more...]
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Confederate negro enlistments. (search)
ler speculated in this sort of business at Fortress Monroe and New Orleans, and Hunter tried it in South Carolina and Florida. Higginson's regiment at Beaufort was ihe field, they cannot be conquered, according to Mr. Lincoln's arithmetic. Senator Hunter, of Virginia, who was constantly and throughout opposed to the policy of ne resolution, materially amended, came up in the House and was passed. Wigfall, Hunter, Caperton, Miles, and other leaders opposed the enlistment policy savagely, but, still, when the bill of Barksdale finally came up in the Senate, Hunter and Caperton voted for it, even while speaking against it. The vote in the Senate on the fin 7th, 1865, was as follows: YEAs-Messrs. Brown, Burnett, Caperton, Henry, Hunter, Oldham, Semmes, Sims, and Watson--9. NAYs — Mssrs. Barnwell, Graham, Johnitfall-8. Thus, the instructions of the Virginia Legislature, by compelling Hunter and Caperton to vote contrary to their opinions, carried the bill through.
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The First cavalry. (search)
Stevenson then took command of his company, and under him it won fresh laurels in the Shenandoah Valley after Gettysburg. It was with General Sigel in the battle of New Market, and was the last to leave the field. It led the advance, under General Hunter, upon Lynchburg, and greatly distinguished itself in the battle of Piedmont, and in the subsequent fighting during Hunter's retreat from Lynchburg over the Alleghenies into the Kanawha Valley. Again at Snicker's gap, Ashby's gap, and WinchesHunter's retreat from Lynchburg over the Alleghenies into the Kanawha Valley. Again at Snicker's gap, Ashby's gap, and Winchester, under General Crook, this company played a conspicuous and noble part. And at Moorfield, under General Averill, it formed part of the gallant two hundred of the First New York (Lincoln) Cavalry, commanded by Captain Jones, that defeated McCausland's whole brigade, returning from the burning of Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. It served under Averill during the memorable advance of General Sheridan against General Early in the Shenandoah Valley, and took part in every battle during the campaig
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