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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 11, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Ferdinand S. Hunter or search for Ferdinand S. Hunter in all documents.

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al McCausland's command was unfounded. He has returned to Romney, having accomplished what he was sent for. He was ordered to obtain one hundred thousand dollars in gold as a ransom for Chambersburg, (in retaliation for the property destroyed by Hunter in the Valley during his raid), or in default of that to burn the town. The gold was not paid, and the town was fired--two hundred and fifty-four houses being destroyed. Hunter's raid will cost the Yankee nation more towns than this one. Thererdered to obtain one hundred thousand dollars in gold as a ransom for Chambersburg, (in retaliation for the property destroyed by Hunter in the Valley during his raid), or in default of that to burn the town. The gold was not paid, and the town was fired--two hundred and fifty-four houses being destroyed. Hunter's raid will cost the Yankee nation more towns than this one. There have been about twenty towns burnt in the Confederacy, and it takes nineteen more to get us even with the Yankees.
onsiderable loss. Both armies are engaged in strengthening their defensive works. A few days since fifty rebel deserters attempted to come into our lines in a body, but our troops, not understanding their intentions, fired on them, and twenty-nine of the number were killed or wounded. Miscellaneous. A dispatch from Fort Smith, Arkansas, says that the rebels, under Generals Cooper, Gaines and Standwaite, were defeated near that place on the 31st ultimo. They were in full retreat, pursued by the Union forces. Lincoln has revoked General Hunter's order banishing rebel sympathizers from Central Maryland. General Hooker has not been assigned to any command yet. He will visit New York. Admiral Dahlgren has published a letter attempting to prove that his son, Ulric, did not write the orders found on his person. The so-called Governor Hahn, of Louisiana, has arrived in Washington. The last quotation of gold in New York is two hundred and fifty-seven.
erceive what advantage he has gained by approaching it now from the south side if he fails in his purpose of cutting the Confederate communications. That the combination on which he relied for that purpose has signally failed cannot be doubted. Hunter may have done damage to the western lines, but he has suffered dearly for his interference, and the injury was speedily repaired. The cavalry, in which the Federal seem to have established a decided preponderance, have failed to effect a perde to march a whole corps and a division to their assistance, with results yet unknown to us. Sheridan, from whom a good deal was expected, has not turned out to be a Zeidlitz, a Murat, or even a Paget. He failed in a very feeble effort to reach Hunter, and he has since lost, we are told, one thousand men in a scamper across the Peninsula, south of Richmond, with the view of getting his corps across the James river to aid the cavalry force belonging to Grant's army. The next great Federal army
Hunter. We published from the Central Presbyterian in the Dispatch of yesterday the narration of the murder of David S. Creigh, of Greenbrier, by order of General Hunter, of the Yankee army. MrGeneral Hunter, of the Yankee army. Mr. Creigh was one of the most estimable citizens of Greenbrier, and was put to death for defending himself and family against the outrages of a Yankee soldier who had first attempted to take his life. This act of the "fiend" Hunter will not be forgotten, and will yet "return to plague" him. There were several other murders perpetrated by him in his invasion of Virginia. They will be remembered, aely ever lead his army in a retreat, as he did in his disgraceful night from Lynchburg. General Hunter, it is said, was not born in Virginia, but in the District — either in Georgetown or Washington. He is said to be the son of the late General Hunter, of the United States army, who was related to some of the Virginia Hunters. It is disgraceful enough that any Virginia blood, however small