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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 2 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Second Virginia regiment of cavalry, C. S. A. a tribute to its discipline and efficiency, and defiant Resolutions passed by it February 28th, 1865. (search)
oung men of the times, and whose eminence and eloquence have fulfilled the promises of early manhood, appeared for one of the prisoners, John E. Cook, and made such a plea for mercy as is rarely heard in a court of justice. In a letter to Miss Florence Hunter, of date January 7, 1889, Mr. Voorhees says: The court itself was a model of judicial decorum, dignity and fairness. If justly represented by the pen of the historian, it would pass into history as the most temperate and conservative judied, it is true, the picket line, as it were, of the war that was coming on between the sections, but he did it in the spirit of the Christian gentleman, without a single tone of malevolence or of exasperated resentment. After the war was over Mr. Hunter and Mr. Voorhees met in Washington, and of that meeting the latter says: He had suffered severely by the war; his house had been burned and his home desolated by his kinsman, (Major-General David Hunter, United States Army), and yet his temper
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
oung men of the times, and whose eminence and eloquence have fulfilled the promises of early manhood, appeared for one of the prisoners, John E. Cook, and made such a plea for mercy as is rarely heard in a court of justice. In a letter to Miss Florence Hunter, of date January 7, 1889, Mr. Voorhees says: The court itself was a model of judicial decorum, dignity and fairness. If justly represented by the pen of the historian, it would pass into history as the most temperate and conservative judied, it is true, the picket line, as it were, of the war that was coming on between the sections, but he did it in the spirit of the Christian gentleman, without a single tone of malevolence or of exasperated resentment. After the war was over Mr. Hunter and Mr. Voorhees met in Washington, and of that meeting the latter says: He had suffered severely by the war; his house had been burned and his home desolated by his kinsman, (Major-General David Hunter, United States Army), and yet his temper