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d to have visited the city of Mexico to obtain a grant of lands, and to have returned satisfied with some vague and illusory promises. In 1825 he was joined to John Hunter, a white man, who, whether fanatic or impostor, had varied experience and much address, and who went to Mexico on the same mission. The constitutional right to make such a grant residing in the State, and not in the Federal Government, his request was refused. Fields and Hunter made a treaty with the Fredonian insurgents, in the winter of 1826; but a rival faction of the Cherokees murdered Hunter, and, led by Bowles, aided in putting down the revolt. Bowles became the war-chief of theHunter, and, led by Bowles, aided in putting down the revolt. Bowles became the war-chief of the Cherokees, and the leading spirit of the Texas Indians. The first concession by the Government to the Cherokees was an order, made August 15, 1831, to the local authorities, to offer them an establishment on a fixed tract of land, which the Political Chief at Bexar afterward reported that they had selected. When it is borne
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 14: from the Rappahannock to the Potomac (search)
ute my escape, in part at least, to my unusually full muscular development at the time. Upon one of our shiftings of position in the battle I was on foot, abreast of one of the guns of the Charlottesville battery, and following close after John Hunter, sergeant of that piece, who was riding his little chestnut mare, Madge, when a thirty-pounder Parrott shell passed through her body, just back of the legs of the rider, exploding as it emerged, and spattering me profusely with the blood of the poor animal. Little Madge was not even jarred-any experienced artillerist will understand this. She never knew what hit her, but sank gently down; while Hunter did not get even so much as a decent shaking up, not a very easy thing to administer to him, I frankly admit. When his feet touched the ground — they were not far from it even while Madge stood up on all fours-he simply disengaged them from the stirrups, turned around, glanced a moment at the bloody horror, and said: Well, poor litt
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 19: Spottsylvania (search)
re able to do so turned to fly and our infantry were following them over the intrenchments; but it is doubtful whether this would have been the result had it not been for the prompt and gallant action of the artillery. There was an old Captai-Hunter,--it seems difficult to determine whether of the Texas or the Georgia regiment,who had the handle of his frying pan in his hand, holding the pan over the hot coals, with his little slice of meat sizzling in it, when the enemy broke over. He had his ministrations where the enemy had broken over; so we walked up there and found their dead and dying piled higher than the works themselves. It was almost dark, but as we drew near we saw a wounded Federal soldier clutch the pantaloons of Captain Hunter, who at that moment was passing by, frying pan in hand, and heard him ask, with intense eagerness: Can you pray, sir? Can you pray? The old captain looked down at him with a peculiar expression, and pulled away, saying, No, my friend, I don
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 22: from Cold Harbor to evacuation of Richmond and Petersburg (search)
ry opportunity to strike an offensive blow; and just as Grant was preparing to move across James River, with his defeated and dispirited army, General Lee was maturing his plans for taking the offensive; and in stating his desire for me to take the initiative with the corps I then commanded, he said: We must destroy this army of Grant's before he gets to James River. If he gets there it will become a siege, and then it will be a mere question of time. It was the startling intelligence of Hunter's operations in the Valley which prevented the contemplated movement against Grant. It became necessary to detach, first Breckenridge, and then Early, to meet this new peril threatening Lee's communications. As Early's corps was to have led the attack, and because it was worse than hopeless to attack at all with his army thus seriously reduced, Lee was compelled to abandon his cherished plan, and Grant retired unmolested from Lee's front on the very night that Early received his orders to
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Index. (search)
e, Moses Drury, 318 Hoge, William James, 139 Hoke, Robert Frederick, 158, 270, 274-75, 287 Hollywood Cemetery, 42 Holmes, Theophilus Hunter, 101-102, 107 Hood's Brigade. See--Texas Brigade Hooker, Joseph, 18, 163-66, 174, 178- 80, 191-92, 227-28, 304, 306, 339 Horse supply, 86, 199-200, 210-11, 234-35. Houston, George Smith, 28-29. Huger, Benjamin, 101, 107 Hugo, Victor, 252 Humphreys, Benjamin Grubb, 64, 115, 261, 292 Hunter, David, 308 Hunter, James, 255 Hunter, John, Jr., 195-96. Hunton, Eppa, 62 I'm a good old Rebel, 18 The impending crisis of the South, 26 Irishmen, 160, 212-14, 229-30. Iuka, Miss., 117 Jackson, Mary Anna Morrison (Mrs. Thomas J.), 160-61. Jackson, Thomas Jonathan: description of and anecdotes concerning, 97-101, 105-106, 121-24, 159-62, 190, 351, 362; mentioned, 18, 21-22, 65-66, 72, 74, 89, 92-93, 110, 132, 164-65, 168-70, 181-82, 188-89, 191, 201, 205, 208, 245-46, 304, 367; at Second Manassas, 122-24. John
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 7: Missouri. April and May, 1861. (search)
Lucas the house on Locust Street, between Tenth and Eleventh, and occupied it on the 1st of April. Charles Ewing and John Hunter had formed a law-partnership in St. Louis, and agreed to board with us, taking rooms on the third floor In the latter through my business as quickly as I could, and got back to my house on Locust Street by twelve o'clock. Charles Ewing and Hunter were there, and insisted on going out to the camp to see the fun. I tried to dissuade them, saying that in case of confl, and children, were in the crowd. I passed along till I found myself inside the grove, where I met Charles Ewing and John Hunter, and we stood looking at the troops on the road, heading toward the city. A band of music was playing at the head, anunded. Of course there was a general stampede. Charles Ewing threw Willie on the ground and covered him with his body. Hunter ran behind the hill, and I also threw myself on the ground. The fire ran back from the head of the regiment toward its r
ace of such realities. So far as the city authorities can prevent, there will be no opposition to your possession of the city. They cannot, however, guaranty that your flag shall wave unmolested in the sight of an excited people; but such authority as they possess shall be exercised for the preservation of good order in the city. As to property belonging to the confederate States, they are not aware of any such within the limits of the city. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, John Hunter, Mayor. To Jas. S. Palmer, Commander U. S. Steamer Iroquois, at anchor off Natchez, Miss. Doc. 109.-Richmond to be defended. The following joint resolutions were adopted by the Virginia Legislature on the fourteenth of May: Resolved, by the General Assembly of Virginia, That the General Assembly hereby express its desire that the capital of the State be defended to the last extremity, if such defence is in accordance with the views of the President of the confederate States,
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 108.-surrender of Natchez, Miss. (search)
eived by me and laid before the Board of Selectmen of this city, and I am directed to return the following reply: Coming as a conqueror, you need not the interposition of the city authorities to possess this place. An unfortified city, an entirely defenceless people, have no alternative but to yield to an irresistible force. It is useless to imperil innocent blood. Formalities are absurd in the face of such realities. So far as the city authorities can prevent, there will be no opposition to your possession of the city. They cannot, however, guaranty that your flag shall wave unmolested in the sight of an excited people; but such authority as they possess shall be exercised for the preservation of good order in the city. As to property belonging to the confederate States, they are not aware of any such within the limits of the city. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, John Hunter, Mayor. To Jas. S. Palmer, Commander U. S. Steamer Iroquois, at anchor off Natchez, Miss.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State of South Carolina, (search)
m D. Simpsonassumes officeFeb. 26, 1879 T. B. Jeterassumes officeSept. 1, 1880 Johnson HagoodinauguratedNov. 30, 1880 Governors under Constitution—Continued. Hugh S. Thompson1882 John P. Richardson1886 Benjamin R. TillmaninauguratedDec. 4, 1890 John Gary EvansDec. 1, 1894 William H. Ellerbe1897 Miles B. McSweeney1899 United States Senators. Name.No. of Congress.Term. Pierce Butler1st to 4th1789 to 1796 Ralph Izard1st to 4th1789 to 1795 Jacob Read4th to 7th1795 to 1801 John Hunter4th to 5th1796 to 1798 Charles Pinckney5th to 7th1798 to 1801 Thomas Sumter7th to 11th1801 to 1810 John Ewing Calhoun7th1801 to 1802 Pierce Butler8th1803 to 1804 John Gailard8th to 20th1805 to 1826 John Taylor11th to 14th1810 to 1816 William Smith14th to 18th1817 to 1823 Robert Y. Hayne18th to 22d1823 to 1832 William Harper19th1826 William Smith20th to 22d1826 to 1831 Stephen D. Miller22d1831 to 1833 John C. Calhoun22d to 28th1833 to 1843 William C. Preston23d to 27th1833 to 1
. The chain winds over two drums of different diameters, winding on to one as it unwinds from the other; the effect gained is as the difference between the two, the smaller the difference the greater the power and the less the speed. Differential Pulleu. Differential pulley. In the geared differential pulley the effect is produced by making one more tooth in one of the wheels the chain passes over than in the other. Differential screw. Diffe-ren′tial screw. Invented by Hunter, the celebrated surgeon. Two threads of unequal pitch are upon the same shaft, one unwinding as the other winds. The effective progression is equal to the difference of the pitches of the two threads. By making this difference very small, great power may be attained without the weakness due to a very fine screw. A B is a plate of metal in which the screw C D plays. This screw is hollow, and receives the smaller screw D E, which is free to move longitudinally, but is restrained from ro
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