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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 29, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Robert W. Hunter or search for Robert W. Hunter in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
uart, of Pennsylvania, and staff, in carriages; invited guests, veterans in regimental formation. The line of march was through the principal streets to the National Boulevard, up the boulevard to the National Cemetery. The Parade was over one mile long and over 1,500 men were in line. At the monument, President George F. Baer presided over the exercises. The invocation was pronounced by Rev. J. Richards Boyle, D. D., of Pennsylvania, and an address of welcome was delivered by Major Robert W. Hunter, representing Governor Swanson, of Virginia. An address of welcome was made in behalf of the Confederate veterans by Judge John T. Goolrick, of this city, and response to these addresses was made by Governor Edwin S. Stuart, of Pennsylvania. Major George F. Baer, president of the commission, made an address and transferred the monument to Governor Stuart. Miss Letitia A. Humphreys, pulled the cord which unveiled the monument. Governor Stuart transferred the monument to the care o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Conrad boys in the Confederate service. (search)
nsburg (now West Virginia), and nephews of Mr. Robert Y. Conrad, belonged to the Martinsburg Company (D) of the Second Virginia Regiment, Stonewall Brigade. The two brothers were killed by the same volley at the battle of First Manassas. Major Robert W. Hunter, now Secretary of Confederate Records, was a lieutenant in that company and adjutant of the regiment. One of the lieutenants of the company was Peyton R. Harrison, a first cousin of the Conrad boys and brother-in-law of Major Hunter. Major Hunter. Owing to a misapprehension of orders, the left of the regiment fell back and got into some confusion; but as soon as the mistake was discovered the officers tried and succeeded in rallying the men. Lieutenant Harrison was shot down; two of his men undertook to lift him up and take him to the rear. He said: Lay me down; you can do nothing for me, I am not afraid to die. Rally to the charge, and in a few minutes was dead. The remains of the two Conrad boys and of Lieutenant Harrison were taken