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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 18 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Diplomatic service. (search)
Plenipotentiary, Quito. Egypt. John G. Long, Agent and Consul-General, Cairo. France. Horace Porter, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Paris. German Empire. Andrew D. White, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Berlin. Great Britain. Joseph H. Choate, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, London. Greece, Rumania, and Servia. Arthur S. Hardy, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Athens. Guatemala and Honduras. W. Godfrey Hunter, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Guatemala City. Haiti. William F. Powell, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Port au Prince. Italy. ————, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Rome. Japan. Alfred E. Buck, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Tokio. Korea. Horace N. Allen, Minister Resident and Consul-General, Seoul. Liberia. Owen L. W. Smith, Minister Resident and Consul-General, Monrovia. Mexico.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Emancipation proclamations. (search)
contained in the act of Congress approved Aug. 6, preceding. Another instance of the kind occurred at the hands of General Hunter, the following year. That officer, being in command at Hilton Head, N. C., proclaimed the States of Georgia, Floridaeen bitterly censured by extremists for his action towards General Fremont, and though he knew that to interfere with General Hunter would only bring upon him even a worse storm of reproaches, he did not shrink from what he believed his duty in the matter. He immediately issued a proclamation sternly revoking General Hunter's order, saying that the government had not had any knowledge of the general's intention to issue an order, and distinctly stating that neither General Hunter nor any other General Hunter nor any other commander or person has been authorized by the government of the United States to make proclamation declaring the slaves of any State free. I further make known, he continued, that whether it be competent for me, as commander-in-chief of the army an
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fremont, John Charles 1813-1890 (search)
possession of New Orleans. More than 20,000 soldiers were set in motion (Sept. 27, 1861) southward (5,000 of them cavalry), under the respective commands of Generals Hunter, Pope, Sigel, McKinstry, and Asboth, accompanied by eighty-six heavy guns. These were moving southward early in October; and on the 11th, when his army was 3enemies, Fremont's career was suddenly checked. False accusers, public and private, caused General Scott to send an order for him to turn over his command to General Hunter, then some distance in the rear. Hunter arrived just as the troops were about to attack Price. He took the command, and countermanded Fremont's orders for bHunter arrived just as the troops were about to attack Price. He took the command, and countermanded Fremont's orders for battle; and nine days afterwards Gen. H. W. Halleck was placed in command of the Department of Missouri. The disappointed and disheartened army were turned back, and marched to St. Louis in sullen sadness. Soon afterwards an elegant sword was presented to Fremont, inscribed, To the Pathfinder, by the men of the West. Ascent
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gillmore, Quincy Adams 1825-1888 (search)
ring at West Point. In October, 1861, he was appointed chief engineer of an expedition against the Southern coasts under Gen. W. T. Sherman. He superintended the construction of the fortifications at Hilton Head, and planned and executed measures for the capture of Fort Pulaski in the spring of 1862, when he was made brigadier-general of volunteers. After service in western Virginia and Kentucky, he was brevet- Quincy Adams Gillmore. ted colonel in the United States army, and succeeded Hunter (June, 1863) in command of the Department of South Carolina, when he was promoted to majorgeneral. After a long and unsuccessful attempt to capture Charleston in 1862, he was assigned to the command of the 10th Army Corps, and in the autumn of 1863, resumed operations in Charleston Harbor, which resulted in his occupation of Morris Island, the reduction of Fort Sumter, and the reduction and capture of Fort Wagner and Battery Gregg. General Gillmore was the author of many works on engineerin