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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 245 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 164 2 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 115 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 113 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 108 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 79 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 60 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 53 7 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 48 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 47 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for David Hunter or search for David Hunter in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.1 (search)
hat a new commander of high engineering repute, General Gillmore, had been sent to supersede General Hunter General Hunter was transferred from the Department of Kansas to the command of the DepartGeneral Hunter was transferred from the Department of Kansas to the command of the Department of the South on the 31st of March, 1862, relieving Brigadier-General Thomas W. Sherman, and was himself relieved by General Quincy A. Gillmore on the 12th of June, 1863. Among the chief events of General Hunter's administration were the capture of Fort Pulaski, April 11th, 1862 (see General Gillmore's description of these operations, Vol. II., p. 1); the declaration of free-dom (April 12th,is day. He had evidently been sent in command of the Department of the South, to effect what General Hunter had failed to do, to wit, the capture of Charleston. General Gillmore's book is valuable ion loss was 683, of whom 529 belonged to Stevens's division. According to the report of General David Hunter, who commanded the department, the attack was made by General Benham in violation of his
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Du Pont's attack at Charleston. (search)
President was with difficulty restrained from sending off Hunter and all the iron-clads directly to New Orleans, the openin Admiral Du Pont had received the letters just quoted, General Hunter sent his chief-of-staff and his chief-of-engineers to eorgia, June 17, 1863. Before leaving Port Royal, General Hunter had constantly insisted that with his force he could dd ridges forming in places a natural parapet; and when General Hunter, on the 8th of April, proposed to occupy that island, eneral Gillmore, who on the 12th of June had succeeded General Hunter, executed his very skillful and well-arranged movementot be taken by a purely naval attack, and had declined General Hunter's proposal to make Morris Island his base of operationttack from James Island with at least double the force General Hunter could put in the field. Events proved the wisdom of tated to require twelve weeks labor. General Gillmore, General Hunter's successor, began his preparations to occupy Morris I
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The army before Charleston in 1863. (search)
gned to the command of the South Atlantic blockading squadron, comprising the naval forces available for operations against Charleston; but he was not permitted to enter upon this new field of labor, his sudden and untimely death leaving the command with Rear-Admiral John A. Dahlgren. [See p. 46.] Charleston was located in the Military Department of the South, comprising the narrow strip of sea-coast held by the Union forces in South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. Upon relieving General David Hunter and assuming command of this department in June, I found our troops actually occupying eleven positions on this stretch of coast, while a small blockading squadron held a variable and more or less imperfect control of the principal inlets. In the neighborhood of Charleston we held all the coast line south of Morris Island, while all the other islands around the harbor, and to the northward, were either controlled or occupied by the enemy. It was found, after abolishing some of these
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Grant on the Wilderness campaign. (search)
irginia Central Railroad, with instructions to Hunter, whom I hoped he would meet near Charlottesvil, I asked his removal from command, and Major-General Hunter was appointed to supersede him. His ins therefore, I think it would be better for General Hunter to move in that direction; reach Staunton Jericho Ford, Va., May 25th, 1864. If Hunter can possibly get to Charlottesville and Lynchb-General. Major-General H. W. Halleck. General Hunter immediately took up the offensive, and, mos very great. To meet this movement under General Hunter, General Lee sent a force, perhaps equal tof which reached Lynchburg a short time before Hunter. After some skirmishing on the 17th and 18th, General Hunter, owing to a want of ammunition to give battle, retired from before the place. Unforeeks from the defense of the North. Had General Hunter moved by way of Charlottesville, instead onever taken exception to the operations of General Hunter, and am not now disposed to find fault wit
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan's Trevilian raid. (search)
permanent injury of Lee's lines of supply was an important element in Grant's purposes. To this end, on the 26th of May, Hunter was directed to move down the Shenandoah Valley to Lynchburg, cut the canal, and return over the Lynchburg branch of the cer was again to cut loose from the army, and, after tearing up the Virginia Central near Gordonsville, to cooperate with Hunter, if practicable. In obedience to instructions Sheridan, with the divisions of Torbert and Gregg, numbering, exclusive ofr, including 20 commissioned officers. My loss in captured will not exceed 150. From prisoners Sheridan learned that Hunter, instead of coming toward Charlottesville, was near Lexington, moving upon Lynchburg; that Ewell's corps was on its way tt Sheridan's further advance. The conclusion of Sheridan, on the night of the 12th, was evidently sound; the movement of Hunter had rendered it impracticable to carry out his orders in the presence of Hampton. On the 18th of June Sheridan learne
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The cavalry fight at Trevilian Station. (search)
nt's column toward the James River and compelled him to adopt a new line of attack. In the progress of these movements, while the splendid infantry and artillery of these two armies were struggling for the mastery around the Confederate capital, Hunter was moving up the valley at the head of a strong force toward Lynchburg to strike at the rear of Richmond. On the 5th of June Grant detached two divisions of his cavalry under Sheridan toward Gordonsville to destroy the railroad communications between Richmond and Gordonsville and Lynchburg, and possibly to form a junction with Hunter. My brigade consisted of the 4th, 5th, and 6th South Carolina Cavalry, then recently transferred from the sea-coast of South Carolina, where they had seen little active service in the field; and this, with Young's and Rosser's brigades, constituted Hampton's division. On the evening of the 8th of June we were encamped not far from Atlee's Station, on the then Virginia Central Railroad. I received ord
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., General Lee in the Wilderness campaign. (search)
es, and of their sublime faith in their great commander. After the battle of Cold Harbor, Lee felt strong enough to send Breckinridge toward the valley to meet Hunter's expedition, and on the 13th to detach Early with the Second Corps, now numbering some eight thousand muskets and twenty-four pieces of artillery, to join Breckis holding the base of the salient against Hancock and Wright and Warren. Besides this, Lee had already detached Breckinridge's division and Early's corps to meet Hunter at Lynchburg. And, after all, the result showed that Lee's reliance on his men to hold in check attacking forces greatly superior in numbers did not fail him in ; that he was bold to audacity was a characteristic of his military genius. The campaign of 1864 now became the siege of Petersburg. On the night of June 18th Hunter retreated rapidly from before Lynchburg toward western Virginia, and Early, after a brief pursuit, marched into Maryland, and on July 11th his advance was before
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 5.35 (search)
rg, a place of vital importance to Lee in Richmond. Butler failed to accomplish what was expected of him; and Sigel failed at the very start, and was replaced by Hunter, who marched up the valley, made junction with Crook and Averell at Staunton, and pushed, on with commendable vigor to Lynchburg, which he invested on the 16th ofwith a force large enough to hold his lines of intrenchment and a surplus for expeditions, detached General Jubal A. Early with the equivalent of a corps to drive Hunter away from Lynchburg. Hunter, far from his base, with inadequate supplies of food and ammunition, retreated by the Kanawha to the Ohio River, his nearest base, thHunter, far from his base, with inadequate supplies of food and ammunition, retreated by the Kanawha to the Ohio River, his nearest base, thereby exposing the Valley of Virginia; whereupon Early, an educated soldier, promptly resolved to take advantage of the occasion, marched rapidly down this valley northward to Winchester, crossed the Potomac to Hagerstown, and thence boldly marched on Washington, defended at that time only by militia and armed clerks. Grant, full
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Red River campaign. (search)
affair were about 200, of which 153 were in Fessenden's brigade. Colonel Fessenden was severely wounded.--R. B. I. The way being thus cleared, the army marched into Alexandria on the 25th and 26th, without further serious molestation. Here General Hunter was met, bearing fresh, and this time very positive, orders from Lieutenant-General Grant to bring the expedition to an end. The records show that General Grant wished Hunter to be sent out to relieve Banks, on the strength of private infoHunter to be sent out to relieve Banks, on the strength of private information received, but that the President was not ready for this.--R. B. I . These orders were afterward suspended (April 30th); but in any case it was now impossible to abandon the navy in its perilous situation above the rapids, with the river falling, and an active enemy on both banks. From this danger the navy, from this reproach the army, from this irreparable disaster the country was saved by the genius and skill of Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph Bailey, of the 4th Wisconsin regiment, then se
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Lynchburg expedition. (search)
The opposing forces in the Lynchburg expedition. The Union Army.--Maj.-Gen. David Hunter. first infantry division, Brig.-Gen. Jeremiah C. Sullivan. First Brigade, Col. Augustus Moor, Col. Geo. D. Wells: 34th Mass. (transferred from 2d BriW. Va.,----; 5th W. Va.,----; 7th W. Va.,----. Third Brigade, Col. William H. Powell: 1st W. Va.,----; 2d W. Va.,----. Hunter started on this expedition with about 8500 men of all arms. After uniting with Crook and Averell at Staunton his force was about 18,000 strong. The Confederate Army. The forces resisting Hunter's advance were commanded by Generals W. E. Jones (killed at Piedmont), J. C. Vaughn, John McCausland, W. L. Jackson, and J. D. Imboden. General John C. Breckinridge's div W. E. Jones (killed at Piedmont), J. C. Vaughn, John McCausland, W. L. Jackson, and J. D. Imboden. General John C. Breckinridge's division and Jubal A. Early's corps arrived at Lynchburg in time to defend the place against Hunter's meditated attack.
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