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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 245 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 164 2 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 115 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 113 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 108 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 79 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 60 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 53 7 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 48 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 47 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for David Hunter or search for David Hunter in all documents.

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hardly be necessary to strike a blow to wrest Texas from Mexico. That it was ample for the establishment and maintenance of a separate and independent government from the United States. That the expedition would be got ready with all possible dispatch. That the demonstration would and must be made in about twelve months from that time. That tile event of success opened the most unbounded prospects of wealth to those who would embark in it, etc., etc. Dr. Mayo further learned from one Hunter, a confederate of Houston, that there were then secret agencies in all the principal cities of the Union, enlisting men for the Texas enterprise. expel the Mexican authorities, and prepare the region for speedy Annexation to this country, as a new make-weight in Mr. Calhoun's scheme of a perpetual balance of power betwen the Free and the Slave States. Houston had scarcely reached Nacogdoches, near the eastern boundary of Texas, when he was elected therefrom a delegate to a Convention called
ut; Fish and Seward, of New York; Chase and Wade, of Ohio; Dodge (Henry), of Wisconsin--10. Nays — Norris and Williams, of New Hampshire; Toucey, of Connecticut; Brodhead, of Pennsylvania; Clayton, of Delaware; Stuart, Gen. Cass, the inventor of Popular Sovereignty, who was in his seat and voted just before, did not respond to the call of his name on this occasion. of Michigan; Pettit, of Indiana; Douglas and Shields, of Illinois; Dodge (A. C.) and Jones, of Iowa; Walker, of Wisconsin; Hunter and Mason, of Virginia; Pratt, of Maryland; Badger, of North Carolina; Butler and Evans, of South Carolina; Dawson, of Georgia; Fitzpatrick and C. C. Clay, of Alabama; Adams and Brown, of Mississippi; Benjamin and Slidell, of Louisiana; Morton, of Florida; Houston and Rusk, of Texas; Dixon, of Kentucky; Bell and Jones, of Tennessee; Atchison, of Missouri; Sebastian and Johnson, of Arkansas; Gwin and Weller, of California--36. So the Senate decisively voted that the people of the new Terr
; Nays 19. Yeas--Messrs. Benjamin, Bigler, Bragg, Bright, Brown, Chesnut, C. C. Clay, Clingman, Crittenden, Davis, Fitzpatrick, Green, Gwin, Hammond, Hemphill, Hunter, Iverson, Johnson, of Ark., Johnson, of Tenn., Kennedy, Lano (Oregon), Latham, Mallory, Mason, Nicholson, Pearce, Polk, Powell, Pugh, Rice, Sebastian, Slidell, Th, of Minnesota, Bright, of Indiana, Gwin and Latham, of California, Lane, of Oregon--in all, seven from Free States; with Messrs. Kennedy and Pearce, of Maryland, Hunter and Mason, of Virginia, Bragg and Clingman, of North Carolina, Chesnut and Hammond, of South Carolina, Iverson and Toombs, of Georgia, C. C. Clay and Fitzpatrick,olk, Pugh, Simmons, Ten Eyck, Toombs, Trumbull, Wade, and Wilson--26. Nays--Messrs. Benjamin, Bright, Brown, Chesnut, Clay, Davis, Fitzpatrick, Green, Hammond, Hunter, Iverson, Lane, Mallory, Mason, Nicholson, Pearce, Powell, Rice, Saulsbury, Sebastian, Slidell, Wigfall, and Yulee--23. [All from Slave States but Bright, Lane,
ans]. Nays.--Messrs. Bayard, Bigler, Bragg, Bright, Clingman, Crittenden, Fitch, Green, Gwin, Hunter, Johnson, of Tennessee, Kennedy, Lane, of Oregon, Mason, Nicholson, Pearce, Polk, Powell, Pugh, sented, and Vice-President John C. Breckinridge December, 20, 1860. appointed Messrs. Powell, Hunter, Crittenden, Seward, Toombs, Douglas, Collamer, Davis, Wade, Bigler, Rice, Doolittle, and GrimesDouglas, Rice, and Powell-5; Nays, Messrs. Davis, Doolittle, Collamer, Wade, Toombs, Grimes, and Hunter--7: absent, Mr. Seward. Messrs. Hunter, Toombs, and Davis, it is said, would have supported it, Messrs. Hunter, Toombs, and Davis, it is said, would have supported it, had it been proposed and sustained by the Republicans. The remaining propositions of Mr. Crittenden received generally a majority of the whole number of votes, but were not considered adopted; the Coby the laws of such State. This was adopted by the following vote: Yeas--Messrs. Powell, Hunter, Crittenden, Seward, Douglas, Collamer, Wade, Bigler, Rice, Doolittle, and Grimes-11. Nays--M
the domestic institutions thereof, etc. This proposed amendment was finally concurred in by the Senate: Yeas 24; Nays 12: as follows: Yeas--Messrs. Anthony, Baker, Bigler, Bright, Crittenden, Dixon, Douglas, Foster, Grimes, Gwin, Harlan, Hunter, Johnson, of Tennessee, Kennedy, Latham, Mason, Morrill, Nicholson, Polk, Pugh, Rice, Sebastian, Ten Eyck, and Thomson-24. Nays--Messrs. Bingham, Chandler, Clark, Doolittle, Durkee, Foot, King, Sumner, Trumbull, Wade, Wilkinson, and Wilson--12efused, by the following vote: Yeas--Messrs. Crittenden, Douglas, Harlan, Johnson, of Tennessee, Kennedy, Morrill, and Thomson-7. Nays--Messrs. Bayard, Bigler, Bingham, Bright, Chandler, Clark, Dixon, Fessenden, Foot, Foster, Grimes, Gwin, Hunter, Lane, Latham, Mason, Nicholson, Polk, Pugh, Rice, Sebastian, Sumner, Ten Eyck, Trumbull, Wade, Wigfall, Wilkinson, and Wilson--28. So the Senate, by four to one, disposed of the scheme of the Peace Commissioners, and proceeded to vote, direc
al or main attack was to be made by a column 15,000 strong, composed of the 2d (Hunter's) and 3d (Heintzelman's) divisions, which, starting from their camps a mile orartillery at 6 1/2 A. M., eliciting no reply; and it was three hours later when Hunter's advance, under Col. Burnside, crossed at Sudley Spring; his men, thirsty with, by infantry also. Continuing to advance, fighting, followed and supported by Hunter's entire division, which was soon joined on its left by Heintzelman's, which haton road entirely to our victorious troops. Gen. Tyler, on hearing the guns of Hunter on our right, had pushed Sherman's, and soon after Keyes's, brigade, over the R; and Lieut. Col. Haggerty, of the 69th New York. Among our wounded were Gen. David Hunter and Gen. S. P. Heintzelman--commanding divisions; Col. Oliver B. Wilcox, hem mortal harm in Congress. V. The fall, very early in the action, of Gen. David Hunter, Colonel of the 3d cavalry in the regular service. commanding the 2d o
th another division on the 30th; and Lane, with the Kansas brigade, was not long behind him. But Hunter, McKinstry, and Pope, with their respective divisions, were still struggling with the badness oftired the day before. removing Fremont from his command, and directing him to turn it over to Gen. Hunter, who had not yet arrived. This was sad news to the great bulk of the army, which had been co and to chase the fragments of their army through Little Rock, and, ultimately, to New Orleans. Hunter not having yet arrived, and the enemy being reported in force at Wilson's Creek, it was determined in council to march out and give him battle next morning; but Hunter came up that night, and the command was turned over to him by Fremont. It does not seem that their advices of the Rebels' proh dictated a second abandonment of Springfield and retreat to Rolla by our army, five days after Hunter had assumed command. No doubt, this was ordered from Washington; but that order was most mistak
150; confers with Jackson, 151; beats Runnells for Governor, 339; his death, 340. See Texas. Huger, Gen., commands near Fort Monroe, 529. Hughes, Francis W., 439. Humphrey, Rev. Luther, John Brown to, 297. Hunt, Gen. Memucan, 151. Hunter, Gen. David, wounded at Bull Run, 545; 551; 593; 594. Hunter, R. M. T., of Va., 317; a Commissioner from Davis to Gov. Jackson, 577. Huntersville, Va., Rebel post captured, 527. Hutchinsons, the, McClellan expels, 629-30. I. IberviHunter, R. M. T., of Va., 317; a Commissioner from Davis to Gov. Jackson, 577. Huntersville, Va., Rebel post captured, 527. Hutchinsons, the, McClellan expels, 629-30. I. Iberville, erects a fort on the Mississippi, 54. Ibrahim Pacha, plants cotton in Egypt. 58. Illinois, the Douglas-Lincoln debate in. 301; the result, 302; the State pledges assistance to the Kentucky Unionists, 495. See Cairo and Alton. imports, value of, by 8th decennial census, 23. Indiana, Republicans beaten in, 301; Republicans a majority in, 326; the State pledges assistance to the Kentucky Unionists, 495. Indiana Territory, formation of, efforts to introduce Slavery, etc., 52-3.