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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 245 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 164 2 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 115 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 113 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 108 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 79 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 60 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 53 7 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 48 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 47 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for David Hunter or search for David Hunter in all documents.

Your search returned 124 results in 7 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Treatment and exchange of prisoners. (search)
ntitled, if captured, to be treated as prisoners of war. Later on, in the fall of that year, came the barbarous orders and conduct of Generals Milroy, Butler and Hunter, which led to the proclamations of outlawry against these officers, and directing that they and their commissioned officers should not be treated, if captured, as, 1864, Mr. Seddon, the Confederate Secretary of War, wrote to General Lee calling his attention to the murder of two citizens, in the Valley of Virginia, by General Hunter's orders, or by his command, suggesting that some course of retaliation should be put in operation to prevent further atrocities of the kind, and asking Gener, have caused us to think kindly of him and to place him in a different class from that in which we have placed Stanton, Halleck, Sherman, Sheridan, Pope, Butler, Hunter, Milroy, and other Federal officers, who took such delight in treating us with such wicked and wanton brutality during the war. But as has been recently said of h
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.23 (search)
864, at which Hampton drove Sheridan back from his attempted raid on Lynchburg to cooperate with Hunter, who was moving down the Valley with the same objective, General Hampton gave me permission to u when General Early came along a few days after, at the head of his column, marching to head off Hunter, then pushing up the Valley to Lynchburg. I knew General Early well, and was attached to him movement. He said it would not do. I'm going to Lynchburg, said he, and as soon as I smash up Mr. Hunter's little tea party, I'm going to Washington myself. You'll put all that out, so you musn't tr to the cavalry brigade of General William E. Jones, who had been killed at Mount Hope Church on Hunter's advance. We began our movement down the Valley from Staunton, Ransom's Cavalry Division on thion for the burning of the home of Governor Letcher of Virginia, which had been destroyed by General Hunter, at Lexington. I bivouacked that night at The Caves, the place of John N. Carroll, Esq. A
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
in command of the Second Army Corps. On this date the corps left Gaines' Mill and marched towards the Blue Ridge to meet Hunter and Crook—Hunter came up the Shenandoah Valley with his command, and Crook came from the Kanawha by way of the Greenbrier White Sulphur Springs. They made a junction at Staunton, Va. Hunter defeated a small number of Confederates under Imboden and Jones at Piedmont, a small town not far from Port Republic. The Federals made their appearance near Lynchburg on June 17tpplies. On the 18th of June, Early with his corps, formed a junction with Imboden and Jones near Lynchburg, and defeated Hunter, driving him in the direction of Salem, Va. Hunter had made an effort to cross the Blue Ridge at Rockfish gap, where the Hunter had made an effort to cross the Blue Ridge at Rockfish gap, where the Virginia Central railroad ran through a tunnel in the mountain, but Jones and Imboden blocked his way. While a student at Dinwiddie's school, near the tunnel, 1859-1860, I often spent my Saturdays in visiting this tunnel and the town of Waynesboro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The campaign and battle of Lynchburg. (search)
service in the lines around Lynchburg and upon Hunter's retreat. After this disaster Jones' commaFor the purpose of carrying out this plan, General Hunter left Staunton on the 10th of June, with hisapeake & Ohio), with the intention of joining Hunter in his march on Lynchburg. He was met on the Lynchburg, with a view of a combined attack on Hunter. Breckinridge was to attack in front and Earlng as much noise as possible, and thus induced Hunter to believe and to report that Early was rapidl glory, a soldier's death. Up to that time Hunter's army was several times larger than that oppouthwest Virginia with a body of cavalry. When Hunter reached Staunton he was ordered across the coud not attack, and the next morning the coward, Hunter, was gone. Early at once started after him, bnon, but she kept up her nerve and spirits. Hunter's headquarters were at old Major Hutter's. He mpt to describe the anxiety of the citizens as Hunter approached, heralded by the accounts of his va[97 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Appendix. (search)
W. Kinnear, George A. Loose, William. Morris, William A. Murphy, Albert E. Mundy, Zachary N. Marx, William. Morford, William P. Marshall, Hunter. Mauck, Peter D. McMaster, John. McAlister, Robt. C. North, Clayton. Poindexter, G. H. Pettyjohn, Charles. Pettyjohn, Jesse N. Padgett, R Davidson, Ellis C. Daniel, John R. Driskill, John R. Echols, Thomas. Fulks, Marshall. Foster, James. Frye, William H. Gilliam, Robert. Hunter, Nehemiah H. Hannah, Robert M. Jones, W. W. Johnson, Thomas H. Kelly, Robert. Layne, David S. Liggon, D. L. Leonard, William. Manley, J. H Jones, John T. Perrow, Willis. Slaughter, Samuel. Taliaferro, Hugh. Bagby, Lilburn. Craddock, David. Christian, Nat. Franklin, Samuel. Hunter, Thomas. Jones, Edmund W. Kinnear, James. Rodes, John. Taliaferro, C. C. Thompson, Thomas. Kirkpatrick's Battery, Company A, Thirty-First Battali
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roll and roster of Pelham's, (search)
Lost an arm at Second Manassas. Evans, William. Killed at Chancellorsville. Gardiner, F. Gavigan, Michael. Garrison. Gibson, E. Goodman, William. Reputed to have been a captain in a Pennsylvania regiment. Greenwell, Hebb. Killed at Aldie, Va., June 18, 1863. Griffin. Haller, Uriah. Hart, Frank. Lost an arm at Second Cold Harbor, Va. Henderson. Higgins. Hobson, Dean. Hollins. Hopkins, William. Wounded at New Baltimore, Va., September, 1863. Hunter, Dr. Pat. Jenkins, Thomas. Johnston, F. N. Kane, James C. Kane, John. Key, John R. King, E. S. Captured at Westminster, Md., June 29, 1863. Latimer, George S. Lewis. Lindsay. Loudenslager, Thomas. Lost an arm at Second Cold Harbor, Va. Luckett, George. Lusby, John. McCabe, George. McCabe, William. McManus. McNellis. Killed at Fredericksburg, Va. Mangum, 1st. Mangum, 2d. Mason, William. Matthews, Henry H. Merryman, Samuel. Min
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index (search)
s order for devastation, 304, 332. Hallack, General H. W., 87 91. Hampton General Wade, 286. Hartford Convention, The, 25. Hawkins, Sir, John. 127. Hayes, General R. B., 292. Hill, General A. P., 111; General D. H., 83. Hitchcock, General E. A., 84. History Committee, Report of members of the, 104; books recommended by, 101. Hoffman Colonel, 106. Hooker, General, Joseph, his brutality, 129. Housatonic destroyed, The, 164. Hunley, C. S. Navy, Captain, 165. Hunter, General D., ruthlessness of, 283, 297. Iron-clad—The first, the Manassas, exploits of, 196. Jackson, General T. J Wounding of 110; mentioned, 111; at Winchester, in May, 1862, 226. Jones Lieutenant Iredell, 138. Jones. D. D., Rev. J. W., 79. Johnson, General B. T., 215, 267, 305; General Edward, 287. Johnson's Island, graves at 268. Johnston's Last Volley at Durham, N. C., 174. Keith, Judge, James, 144. Kemper, General J. L., sketch of, portrait of, 260. Kentucky Resolut