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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Moses Hunter or search for Moses Hunter in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.17 (search)
Samuel H. Weir, Arch. Withrow, James H. Wilson, Howard Wilson, Samuel B. Walker. Killed—A. A. Moore; Robert McChesney, bushwhacked near St. George, Tucker county, in 1861; Andrew Ervin, killed at Bratton's farm; Howard Houston, in battle, 1864; James Lockridge in battle in 1863; A. B. Mackey, at Moorefield, W. Va., in 1864; H. Rudd Morrison, in 1862; John F. Tribbett, at Monocacy in 1864; Samuel B. Walker and James H. Wilson, April 9, 1865, at Appomattox Courthouse; M. X. White, shot by Hunter's command near Lexington, while a prisoner, in 1864. Died During War—Samuel B. Anderson, Jacob H. Anderson, Robert Anderson, Charles B. Buchanan, Z. J. Colton, William B. Firebaugh, Henry Firebaugh, Joseph Kinnear, Robert Sterret, Alexander Stuart. The following died in prison: H. W. Patterson, Cyrus Patterson, John Henry Mackey, Gideon Marks, William Brownlee, William Black. Wesley Paxton was drowned in the Kanawha river in 1862. The 14th Virginia Regiment was in Jenkins', afterwa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Hon. James Murray Mason, of Mason & Slidell fame. (search)
se of citizens, and we were struck with the singularly same ring of metal which sounds in the old George Mason Bill of Rights. He was not, however, neglectful of his profession, was diligent in its practice, and the bench and bar of Winchester and surrounding circuits then, even more than now, were distinguished for eminent lawyers, such as Henry St. George Tucker, Alfred H. Powell and John R. Cooke, and a younger tier of professional devotees, such as the two Marshalls, the Conrads and Moses Hunter, the best wit of them all. Mr. Mason took a high rank among them at the bar, but always looked to politics for his field of distinction; yet he was no demagogue, and spurned the ad captandum of the vulgar electioneerer. His forte was good taste; and he had the keenest relish for the aesthetical. The word proper with him embraced not only what was befitting, in good phase and seeming, but what was just, manly and right in itself. His education partook of the French school, and it modifi