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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 50 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 41 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 24, 1862., [Electronic resource] 13 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 16, 1861., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 23, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Robert M. T. Hunter or search for Robert M. T. Hunter in all documents.

Your search returned 27 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.6 (search)
the Confederates but unconditional submission to Federal authority. I will not go over that presentation of facts again, but will add to it two more statements—one by President Davis and one by President Lincoln. President Davis's statement. In submitting to the Confederate Congress the report of our commissioners to the Hampton Roads conference, President Davis said: I herewith transmit, for the information of Congress, the report of the eminent citizens above named (Stephens, Hunter, and Campbell), showing that the enemy refused to enter into negotiations with the Confederate States, or any one of them separately, or to give to our people any other terms or guarantees than those which the conquerer may grant, or to permit us to have peace on any other basis than our unconditional submission to their rule, coupled with the acceptance of their recent legislation on the subject of the relations between the white and black populations of each State. Such is, as I understan
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
mention that Corporal E. S. Hart, of Company D, was flag-bearer of the 23rd at Spotsylvania, as he had been in previous engagements. In the hands of Hart, while he was able to be on his pegs, that flag was never lowered except once, and that was when he was knocked down with the breech of a gun by a Federal. The second Cold Harbor battle was not participated in by the 23d, but about this time it, with the brigade, was detached from Lee's army and sent into the valley under Early to meet Hunter. Captain Frank Bennett, of Anson county, was acting colonel of the regiment, and in that celebrated campaign the command was spoken of as Bennett and his invincibles. It has been impossible, and will be, to report accurately the losses of the regiment in the campaign just closed, or in that now just opening before our command. The career of General Robert D. Johnston's Brigade, in the brilliant campaign with Early, is but a history of the 23d Regiment, which constantly shared its fortune
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
Hon. R. M. T. Hunter. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, Dec. 5, 1897.] An address by Colonelhe purpose of removing the remains of the Hon. R. M. T. Hunter from their place of burial in Essex cyour patience a full and complete account of Mr. Hunter's life and public services. That duty devolived the crucible. Early environments. Mr. Hunter was born in this little county on the 21st Aype of Virginia character and principles. Mr. Hunter was indeed fortunate in those surroundings aiscal system! On the subject of the tariff, Mr. Hunter followed the teachings of Adam Smith, Ricardnal principle of modern politics. In 1846 Mr. Hunter was elected by the General Assembly, to the said a great statesman of the Old World. Mr. Hunter's tastes and studies fitted him especially f to regulate the gold and silver coinage. Mr. Hunter spoke also on foreign affairs as such questis superior in general, all-'round ability to Mr. Hunter; not one was his equal in legislative force [13 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
Sparrow. He passed through Montgomery on his way to Richmond, and here Mrs. Semmes met her parents, who were delighted that a son-in-law of theirs had this high honor conferred upon him, so dearly did they love the South. Mrs. Semmes referred laughingly to the beautiful trousseau that her father presented her with to take to Richmond, as became the wife of a Confederate Senator. In Congress, Mr. Semmes was at once appointed a member of the Finance Committee, in connection with Honorable R. M. T. Hunter, of Virginia, and Honorable Robert Barnwell, of South Carolina, and a member of the Judiciary Committee, of which Honorable B. H. Hill was chairman. He was also chairman of the joint committee on the flag and seal of the Confederate States. As chairman of the joint committee on flag and seal, Mr. Semmes took an active part, and his efforts were of no little importance in the selection and adoption of an appropriate motto for the seal finally adopted. In conjunction with Mr. Hunt
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
ohn H. Reagan, 68. Hare, Lt., killed, 357. Hare's Hill, Battle of, 175 Harpers' Ferry, Capture of, 254. Harris, Col. David Bullock 6. Harrison, Capt., C. Shirley, 139, 285. Hatchers Run. Battle of, 175. Hayes, R. B., 163, 321. Hensley, Major J. O., 139. Hill, Gen. A. P., 255. Hill, Gen. D. H., 107, 156. Hill, Major J. C., 14. Hobson, Col. Edwin L., 105. Hoke, Col. W. J., 258, 261. Holmes, Gen. J. H.,4, 215. Hopkins, George, 377. Howletts, Charge at, 12. Hunter, R. M. T., Sketch of, 193. Hyman, Col. J. H., 263. Iverson, Gen., Alfred, 165. Jackson, Gen. T. J., His Career and Character, 91; his corps, English estimate of, 92: fatal wounding of, 256; incidents in his life at West Point, 309; in a duel, 312; death of, 328. Jenkins, Gen. M, 7. Johnson, Gen. B. R., 13, 19, 90. Johnson, Gen. B. T., 173. Johnson, Gen., Edward, 170. Johnston, Gen. Joseph E., 154, 157, 161; his negotiations with Sherman, 272. Jones, Lt.-Col., killed, 9. Jordan