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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 4 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 2 0 Browse Search
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from most scientists and philosophers, and was inclined to the opinion that the world would follow the darned thing off! Late in the evening we reached Indianapolis, and hurried to Browning's hotel, losing sight of the stranger altogether. We retired to our room to brush and wash away the dust of the journey. In a few minutes I descended to the portico, and there descried our long, gloomy fellow-traveller in the center of an admiring group of lawyers, among whom were Judges McLean and Huntington, Edward Hannigan, Albert S. White, and Richard W. Thompson, who seemed to be amused and interested in a story he was telling. I enquired of Browning, the landlord, who he was. Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois, a member of Congress, was the response. I was thunderstruck at the announcement. I hastened upstairs and told Hammond the startling news, and together we emerged from the hotel by a back door and went down an alley to another house, thus avoiding further contact with our now distingui
. Kensett, Gray, and Lang embodied resolutions which were adopted by those present, expressing their desire to contribute to the relief of families of volunteers of the city of New York who are now serving in defence of government and law, and resolving that a committee be appointed to solicit contributions of pictures or other works of art, to be disposed of at public auction; said committee to have power, also, to receive moneys presented in aid of the fund. Messrs. Gray, Lang, Hubbard, Huntington, Stone, and Baker were named the committee, with full power to forward the plan proposed.--N. Y. Evening Post, May 7. The Ithaca (N. Y.) volunteers arrived in New York on their way to the seat of war. They number one hundred and fifteen men, and are commanded by the following officers:--Captain, Jerome Rowe; First Lieutenant, James Tischner; Ensign, William O. Wyckoff; Orderly Sergeant, William Godley; Second Sergeant, Edwin C. Fulkenson; Third do., Edward Atwater; Fourth do., Dr. To
ith a loss of four men wounded. Four horses were captured, and carried into the Union lines late in the evening. One of the horses belonged to a Lieut. Polk, of Columbia, Tenn., the left side of the saddle being covered with blood.--Brig.-Gen. Lucius J. Polk, C. S. A., gave himself up to Gen. Negley, in command at Columbia, Tenn. He was released on parole. At Edenburg, Va., to-day, the rebels opened fire upon the National pickets, but were soon dispersed by a rapid cannonade from Capt. Huntington's battery.--N. Y. Times, April 8. The gunboat Pittsburgh ran the blockade of Island Number10, last night, under a terrific fire from the rebel batteries. Four steam transports and five barges were also got through the Slough, from Phillips's Landing, above the Island, to New Madrid, by Col. Bissell's corps of engineers. This morning, under the fire of the Union gunboats, which silenced one of the rebel batteries, a company, under Capts. Lewis and Marshall, crossed the Mississip
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 15: the Army of the Potomac on the Virginia Peninsula. (search)
pointed. Report of General Tyler to General Shields, June 12, 1862. The National troops employed in third struggle were the Seventh Indiana; Fifth, Seventh, and Twenty-ninth Ohio; and the First Virginia, with sections of Captains Clarke and Huntington's batteries, on the right; and the Eighty-fourth and One Hundred and Tenth Pennsylvania; Sixty-sixth Ohio, and sections of Captains Clarke, Huntington, and Robinson's batteries, and a company each of the Fifth and Sixty-sixth Ohio, as skirmisheHuntington, and Robinson's batteries, and a company each of the Fifth and Sixty-sixth Ohio, as skirmishers, on the left, which was the key of the position. In the engagement and retreat the Confederates captured four hundred and fifty prisoners, and eight hundred muskets. So ended the battle of Port Republic; Port Republic is a small village on the eastern bank of the south fork of the Shenandoah River, pleasantly situated on a plain. It is a post village of Rockingham County. and Jackson telegraphed to Richmond, saying--Through God's blessing the enemy near Port Republic was this day routed,
ng been ordered to report to these headquarters, is ordered to proceed immediately to his regiment, at Lexington, Tenn., and assume command of the companies stated in Special Orders, No. 4, from headquarters Army of the Mississippi. He will receive from Lieutenant-Colonel Miller the written orders and instructions he has received, and will obey them so far as they do not conflict with those subsequently issued. Colonel Lindsay's regiment will occupy the line from Lexington, Tenn., to Huntington. He will keep in constant communication with the commanders of cavalry on his right and left, whose headquarters respectively are at Purdy Station and McKenzie Station. Colonel Lindsay will have under observation and guard all the roads and approaches on the front of the line he is ordered to occupy, and he will see that his scouts connect with the cavalry scouts of Lieutenant-Colonel Brewer on his right and Colonel Claiborne on his left. He is instructed to place his main body at a posi
me of their first appearance until five o'clock in the evening, when, ascertaining the approach of Gen. Jackson in force, he sent word to Gen. Shields of the threatened attack upon the town. Upon this information, Col. Kimball's brigade and Capt. Huntington's battery, First Ohio, were immediately advanced upon the Strasburg road, the direction from which the enemy were approaching, and only a mile from the outskirts of the town met the enemy's battery in position at the right of the road, upon a hill, their guns all pointing down the turnpike. Capt. Huntington's battery was immediately placed in position likewise, at the right of the road and in a hollow; and Gen. Shields, with his staff, rode to the front, and himself gave the order to fire, when a shell from the enemy's battery exploded near him, a fragment striking his arm and causing a fracture of the long-bone, not making the slightest rupture of the skin. The skirmish closed at dusk, the only other accident of which was the ki
amented Nelson, and by their courage proved that they had caught a large portion of his heroic and unconquerable spirit. During the whole day I regarded the battery under the command of Lieutenant Parsons, assisted by Lieutenants Cushing and Huntington, as my right arm, and well did the conduct of these courageous and skilful young officers justify my confidence. My orders to Parsons were simple: Fight where you can do the most good. Never were orders better obeyed. The reported conduct their officers and men, all, with one exception, deserve most grateful mention for their coolness and bravery throughout the battle. Lieutenant Parsons, commanding Batteries H and M, Fourth artillery, and his officers, Lieutenants Cushing and Huntington, deserve great credit for their courage under the hottest of the enemy's fire. They were probably under closer fire and more of it than any other battery in the left wing, and perhaps in the army. I am more than pleased with the way they beha
A. Woodhull Brevet lieutenant-colonel J. J. Woodward Brevet major Charles R. Greenleaf Brevet lieutenant-colonel J. S. Billings probably have made them national figures in the military history of the United States. Some of the names on this medical roll of honor from the regular army are those of Finley, Hammond, Barnes, Crane, Murray, Moore, Sutherland, Baxter, Sternberg, and Forwood, all of them surgeons-general during or after the war. Others were Letterman, Smart, Woodward, Huntington, Otis, Woodhull, Smith, Greenleaf, and others whose great services might be mentioned. Many of these men became figures of national importance in a medical and surgical sense. Some in their time were recognized as the highest authorities the world over in respect to the professional subjects with which they had been particularly identified. Contrary to the usual idea of the general public, army medical officers have many important duties outside the actual professional treatment of si
A. Woodhull Brevet lieutenant-colonel J. J. Woodward Brevet major Charles R. Greenleaf Brevet lieutenant-colonel J. S. Billings probably have made them national figures in the military history of the United States. Some of the names on this medical roll of honor from the regular army are those of Finley, Hammond, Barnes, Crane, Murray, Moore, Sutherland, Baxter, Sternberg, and Forwood, all of them surgeons-general during or after the war. Others were Letterman, Smart, Woodward, Huntington, Otis, Woodhull, Smith, Greenleaf, and others whose great services might be mentioned. Many of these men became figures of national importance in a medical and surgical sense. Some in their time were recognized as the highest authorities the world over in respect to the professional subjects with which they had been particularly identified. Contrary to the usual idea of the general public, army medical officers have many important duties outside the actual professional treatment of si
and the Memphis and Charleston Railroad. What was left of General Polk's forces (about seven thousand men) was then assembled, mainly upon Humboldt, at the intersection of the Memphis and Louisville and Mobile and Ohio Railroads—a point having central relation and railroad communication with the principal towns in west Tennessee and north Mississippi. A strong line of infantry outposts was established from Union City, on the left, to Lexington, on the right, by the way of Dresden and Huntington, protected by a line of cavalry pickets thrown well out in advance, from Hickman, on the Mississippi, to Paris, near the Tennessee River. Mounted parties, supplied with light artillery, patrolled the west bank of the latter stream, and kept General Beauregard well informed of the movements of the enemy's boats. During the evacuation of Columbus, reports of great preparations for an offensive movement had reached General Beauregard from the Federal rendezvous at Cairo, Paducah, and Fort
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