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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Last days of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
the data at hand. One of Pickett's brigades had not reaceed him, and Anderson's whole division was not present. Of the cavalry reported February 20, 1865, a large number were dismounted. General Pickett estimates the total force as considerably less than stated in the text. These forces of Lee were concentrated at Five Forks on the evening of the 30th of March. General Lee struck the exposed flank of the Fifth corps and drove back two of its divisions with the brigades of McGowan, Gracie, Hunton and Wise, but the ground was wooded, and the third division of Warren's corps coming to his assistance, the retreat of his other two divisions was stopped, while an attack by Humphrey on the left of Wise's brigade, which was the extreme left of the Confederate attacking force, compelled the retirement of the Confederate force to their intrenchments. Foiled in the attempt to destroy the Fifth corps, and paucity of numbers constraining him to be cautious, Lee next attempted the destruction
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
t you will let me ride; I am sick to-day, and besides that, remember Williamsburg. Now Williamsburg was my home and I remembered that Colonel Williams had been shot through the shoulder in that battle and left at Mrs. Judge Tucker's house on the courthouse green. This I had heard, for I missed that fight, so I answered: Mount your mare and I will make an excuse for you. General Garnett had been injured by a kick while passing through the wagon train at night, had been allowed to ride; Colonel Hunton of the same brigade also rode, being unable to walk. He fell on one side of the red barn and General Kemper on the other side. So there were eight mounted officers, counting General Pickett and staff, mounted in the charge. Colonel Williams fell earlier in the fight. His mare went up rideless almost to the stone wall and was caught when walking back by Captain William C. Marshall, of Dearing's Battalion. His own horse, Lee, having been killed, he rode Colonel Williams' mare away
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg-Pickett's charge. (search)
so many kinsmen and friends; and with it comes the mournful lamentations of Virginia herself, the mother of us all, over the loss of so many of her bravest and best sons. Of her generals Garnett is dead, Armistead is dying; and Kemper desperately wounded. Of her colonels of regiments six are killed on the field, Hodges, Edmonds, Magruder, Williams, Patton, Allen, and Owen is dying and Stuart mortally wounded. Three lieutenant-colonels are killed, Calcutt, Wade and Ellis. Five colonels, Hunton, Terry, Garnett, Mayo and Aylett, are wounded. Four lieutenant-colonels commanding regiments, Martin, Carrington, Otey and Richardson are wounded. Of the whole compliment of field officers in fifteen regiments only one escaped unhurt, Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph C. Cabell. The loss of company officers are in equal proportion. It is a sad, mournful summing up. Let the curtain fall on the tragic scene. But there are some of those who fell on that field whom I cannot pass by with a mere en
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Colonel James Gregory Hodges. (search)
to do all that was possible to be done to win victory at any sacrifice of life. All know the awful fatality among the officers and men of the division. Of its generals, Garnett was killed, Armistead fatally wounded, and Kemper desperately wounded. Of its colonels of regiments six were killed outright on the field: Hodges, Edmonds, Magruder, Williams, Patton, Allen, and Owens and Stuart were mortally wounded. Three lieutenant-colonels were killed: Calcott, Wade and Ellis. Five colonels, Hunton, Terry, Garnett, Mayo and Aylett were wounded, and four lieutenant-colonels, commanding regiments, Carrington, Otey, Richardson and Martin, were wounded. Of the whole complement of field officers in fifteen regiments one only, Lieut. Col. Joseph C. Cabell, escaped unhurt. Of the field officers of the Fourteenth Virginia, Col. Hodges, Maj. Poore and Adjutant John S. Jenkins were killed, and Lieut. Col. William White was wounded. Col. Hodges led his regiment in this memorial charge with c
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Eighth Virginia's part in second Manassas. (search)
hat had an enfilading fire on him. He came up on us, and as my men, having given up the chase, they joined his left. But very soon the battery was taken, and firing ceased. Who took this battery I cannot say, but I have always thought that both Hunton and the Fourth Texas had something to do with it. The next morning as we were forming line I found our right lapped by about one company of Jenkins's, but he, fortunately coming just then, moved his men to the right, as our touch was to the lehat had an enfilading fire on him. He came up on us, and as my men, having given up the chase, they joined the left. But very soon the battery was taken, and firing ceased. Who took this battery I cannot say, but I have always thought that both Hunton and the Fourth Texas had something to do with it. The enemy being gone, we returned to our bivouac and sent out a detail to look for our missing men. After awhile Aden Rogers, with one or two more, came in with a finely equipped horse, on whic
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Notes. (search)
is right; Wilcox on his left, but slightly in the rear, connected the two corps of the Confederate army at the foot of the hill upon which Lee had posted a portion of his artillery. Kemper's division was on Evans' right; the first brigade, under Hunton, was drawn close to the latter; the other two, extending across a rough country, formed but a partial connection with D. R. Jones' division. About noon the three brigades of this division had planted themselves on the extreme right in very strodespatched the new division that McDowell had brought him. At the same time, Longstreet, wishing to relieve the Second corps, ordered Hood to advance, whose fresh troops dashed against those of King, while his artillery on the left and Evans' and Hunton's brigades on the right pressed them close on both flanks. The combat was long and desperate: the Federals, inferior in numbers, made a good stand in the dark, but they could naturally gain no ground over their adversaries. The result of the b
at its importance demanded. He was excused, and Mr. Baldwin, of Augusta, was appointed in his place. Mr. Clemens also asked to be excused from saving, on the ground of physical disability. The request was granted, and Mr. Jackson, of Wood, was appointed instead. The President announced the Committee on Elections as follows: Messrs. Haymond of Marion, Goggin of Bedford, Brown of Preston, Chambliss of Greensville and Sussex, Caperion of Monroe, Ambler of Louisa, Gray of Rockbridge, Hunton of Prince William, Campbell of Washington, Treadway of Pittsylvania, Hall of Lancaster, Sheffey of Smythe, and Patrick of Kanawha. The President submitted a package of election returns, which were referred to the appropriate committee. Resolutions. Mr. Sutheruin offered a resolution, which was adopted, admitting editors and reporters of newspapers generally, throughout the State, to seats in the Hall, under the direction of the President. Mr.Turner offered a resolution, wh
(President,) Ambler, Armstrong, Blakey, Boissean, Borst, Bouldin, Bruce, Cecil, Chambliss, Chapman, Conn, R. H. Cox, Fisher, Flournoy, Forbes, Garland, Graham, Gregory, Goggin, Jno Goode. T. F. Goode, Hale, C. Hall, L. S. Hall, Harvie, Holcombe, Hunton, Isbell, M. Johnson, Kent, Kilby, Kindred, Lawson, Leake, C. K. Mallory, J. B. Mallory, Marshall, Marr, Montague, Morris, Morton, Neblett, Parks, Preston, Price, Randolph, Richardson, R. E. Scott, Seawell, Sheffey, Southall, Speed, Strange, Thorn, Waller, white, Wickham, Willey, and Woods--95. nays.--Messrs. Ambler, Blakey, Boissean, Borst, Cecil, Chambliss, Chapman, Conn, R. H. Cox, Fisher, Graham, Gregory, John Goode, Jr. , Thos. F. Goode, Cyrus Hall, L. S. Hall, Harvie, Holcombe, Hunton, Isbell, Kent, Kilby, Kindred, Leake, Montague, Morris, Morton, Neblett, Parks, Randolph, Richardson, Seawell, Strange, Thornton, R. H. Turner, F. B. Turner, Whitfield, Williams, Wise, and Wysor--40. so the resolution was laid on the table
e, Graham, Grant, Gravely, Gray, A. Hall, E. B. Hall, Haymond, Hoge, Hubbard, Hull, Jackson, M, Johnson, P. C. Johnston, Lewis, McComas, McGrew, McNeil, Macfarland, Maslin, Masters, Moffett, Moore, Nelson, Patrick, Porter, Preston, Price, Pugh, Saunders, R. E. Scott, W. C. Scott, Sharp, Sitlington, Southall, Speed, Spurlock, A. H. H. Stuart. C. J. Stuart, Tarr, Taylor, White, Wickham, and Willey.--71. Nays.-- Messrs. Armstrong, Blow, Bolssean, Borst. Bouldin, Cabell, Cecil, Chambliss, Chapman, Coun. C. B. Conrad, R. H. Cox, Fisher, Garland, Graham, Gregory, Goggin, J. Goode, Jr., T. F. Goode, Hale. C. Hall, L. S. Hall Harvie, Holcombe, Hunton, Isbell, Kent, Kilby, Kindred, Lawson, Leake, J. B. Mallory, Marr, Montague, Morris, Morton, Neblett, Randolph, Richardson, Seawell, Sheffey, Strange, Thornton, R. H. Turner, F. B. Turner, Tyler, Williams, Wilson, Wise, and Woods.--50. The resolution, as amended, then passed. On motion of Mr. E. B. Hall,the Convention adjourned.
ia be and they are hereby most cordially tendered to the Hon. John J. Crittenden, for his reasonable, jealous and patriotic efforts in the Senate of the United States to bring about a just and honorable adjustment of our national difficulties. Mr. Wise, of Princess Anne, moved to lay the resolution upon the table, upon which motion Mr. Brown called for the yeas and nays, and the vote resulted as follows: Yeas.--Messrs. Blakey, Bolssean, Borst, Boulbin, Conn, Fisher, Graham, Harvie, Hunton, Isbeth, Leake, Macfarland, Millor, Morton, Orrick, Baldwin, Seawell, Slanghter, Speed, Strange, Thernton, Ro. H. Turner, Wise, and Woods--23. Nays.--Messrs. Janney, (President,) Aston, baldwin, Alfred Mr. Barbour, James Barbour, Taylor, Berlin, Blow, Jr., Boggess, Branch, Brent, Brown, Bruce, Burdett, Burley, Caperton, Carder, Chapman, Clemens, Coffman, C. B. Conrad, Ro. Y. Conrad, Couch, Critcher, Custis, Dent, Beskias, Dulany, Early, Echols, Forbes, Fugate, Garland, Gillespie, Grant,
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