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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 2 (search)
the whole field. The aspect of affairs was not encouraging, yet I had strong hope that Beauregard's capacity and courage, the high soldierly qualities of Bee and Jackson, and the patriotic enthusiasm of our Southern volunteers, would maintain the fight until adequate reenforcements could be brought to their aid. Urgent messages were sent to Bonham, Holmes, and Early, to hasten the march of their troops; and Ewell was directed to follow them with his brigade as quickly as possible. Colonel Hunton with his regiment, and Colonel (Governor) Smith with his battalion, both detached from Cocke's brigade, were sent to Bee's support. Many of the broken troops, individual stragglers as well as fragments of companies, were reorganized and led back into the fight with the help of my own staff and a part of General Beauregard's. The largest of these bodies, about equal to four companies, and so organized, having no field-officer with it, was placed under the command of Colonel F. J. Thomas,
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter3 (search)
may reasonably doubt the occurrence, not merely of the victory claimed, but of any serious engagement. On the 21st, Evans's brigade, near Leesburg, was attacked by a detachment of Federal troops, commanded by Colonel Baker. Four Federal regiments crossed the Potomac at Edwards's Ferry, and were held in check by Colonel Barksdale's (Thirteenth) Mississippi regiment. Five others, under Colonel Baker's immediate direction, crossed the river at the same time at Ball's Bluff, and were met by Hunton's (Eighth Virginia), Featherston's (Seventeenth Mississippi), and Burt's (Eighteenth Mississippi) regiments, and after an obstinate contest driven over Ball's Bluff in such a panic that numbers rushed into the river and were drowned. Colonel Baker had fallen on the field. Brigadier-General Evans reported that the Confederate loss was thirty-six killed, including the gallant Colonel Burt, one hundred and seventeen wounded, and two captured; and that of the enemy, thirteen hundred killed,
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Letters. (search)
to be used according to circumstances. 7th. The light batteries will be distributed as follows: (1.) To General Ewell's command; Captain Walker's, six pieces. (2.) To Brigadier-General Jones; Captains Alburtis's and Stannard's batteries, eight pieces. (3.) To Brigadier-General Longstreet's; Colonel Pendleton's and Captain Imboden's batteries, eight pieces. (4.) To Brigadier-General Bonham's; Captains Kemper's and Shields's batteries, eight pieces. (5.) To Colonels Cocke and Hunton; Captains Latham's and Beckham's batteries, twelve pieces. 8th. Colonel Radford, commanding cavalry, will detail to report immediately as follows: To General Ewell, two companies of cavalry. To General Jones, two companies of cavalry. To General Longstreet, two companies of cavalry. To General Bonham, two companies of cavalry. To Colonel Cocke the remaining companies of cavalry, except those on special service. 9th. The Fourth and Fifth Divisions, after the fall of