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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 2 (search)
the whole field. The aspect of affairs was not encouraging, yet I had strong hope that Beauregard's capacity and courage, the high soldierly qualities of Bee and Jackson, and the patriotic enthusiasm of our Southern volunteers, would maintain the fight until adequate reenforcements could be brought to their aid. Urgent messages were sent to Bonham, Holmes, and Early, to hasten the march of their troops; and Ewell was directed to follow them with his brigade as quickly as possible. Colonel Hunton with his regiment, and Colonel (Governor) Smith with his battalion, both detached from Cocke's brigade, were sent to Bee's support. Many of the broken troops, individual stragglers as well as fragments of companies, were reorganized and led back into the fight with the help of my own staff and a part of General Beauregard's. The largest of these bodies, about equal to four companies, and so organized, having no field-officer with it, was placed under the command of Colonel F. J. Thomas,
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter3 (search)
may reasonably doubt the occurrence, not merely of the victory claimed, but of any serious engagement. On the 21st, Evans's brigade, near Leesburg, was attacked by a detachment of Federal troops, commanded by Colonel Baker. Four Federal regiments crossed the Potomac at Edwards's Ferry, and were held in check by Colonel Barksdale's (Thirteenth) Mississippi regiment. Five others, under Colonel Baker's immediate direction, crossed the river at the same time at Ball's Bluff, and were met by Hunton's (Eighth Virginia), Featherston's (Seventeenth Mississippi), and Burt's (Eighteenth Mississippi) regiments, and after an obstinate contest driven over Ball's Bluff in such a panic that numbers rushed into the river and were drowned. Colonel Baker had fallen on the field. Brigadier-General Evans reported that the Confederate loss was thirty-six killed, including the gallant Colonel Burt, one hundred and seventeen wounded, and two captured; and that of the enemy, thirteen hundred killed,
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Letters. (search)
to be used according to circumstances. 7th. The light batteries will be distributed as follows: (1.) To General Ewell's command; Captain Walker's, six pieces. (2.) To Brigadier-General Jones; Captains Alburtis's and Stannard's batteries, eight pieces. (3.) To Brigadier-General Longstreet's; Colonel Pendleton's and Captain Imboden's batteries, eight pieces. (4.) To Brigadier-General Bonham's; Captains Kemper's and Shields's batteries, eight pieces. (5.) To Colonels Cocke and Hunton; Captains Latham's and Beckham's batteries, twelve pieces. 8th. Colonel Radford, commanding cavalry, will detail to report immediately as follows: To General Ewell, two companies of cavalry. To General Jones, two companies of cavalry. To General Longstreet, two companies of cavalry. To General Bonham, two companies of cavalry. To Colonel Cocke the remaining companies of cavalry, except those on special service. 9th. The Fourth and Fifth Divisions, after the fall of
lock, I became convinced that the main point of attack would be at Ball's Bluff, and ordered Colonel Hunton, with his regiment — the Eighth Virginia Volunteers--to repair immediately to the support of Colonel Jenifer. I directed Colonel Hunton to form line of battle immediately in the rear of Colonel Jenifer's command, and to drive the enemy to the river; that I would support his right with artillery. About twenty minutes past twelve o'clock M., Colonel Hunton united his command with that of Colonel Jenifer, and both commands soon became hotly engaged with the enemy in his strong position ch his regiment — the Eighteenth Mississippi--and attack the left flank of the enemy, while Colonels Hunton and Jenifer attacked him in front. On arriving at his position, Colonel Burt was received other three regiments to fall back toward Carter's Mill, to rest and be collected in order. Colonel Hunton, with his regiment and two pieces of artillery, was halted at a strong position on the south
brigade, whose reports are herewith forwarded, and who make especial mention of some of their officers: among them most particularly is Lieutenant-Colonel Gardner, Fourth Virginia infantry, who was severely wounded. I cannot too highly mention the gallantry of Captain Brockenbrough, chief of artillery, and of Captain Wooding and Lieutenant Jones, Wooding's battery, and Lieutenant Lambie, Carpenter's battery, all of whom were severely wounded; and of Captain Caskie, Lieutenants McKendree, Hunton, Statham, Early, and Donald. It is with great pain I have to add that the division has to deplore the loss of one of its most gallant officers of artillery, Lieutenant Barton, and two gallant officers of the Twenty-first Virginia regiment, Captain Ames and Lieutenant Swoop, who fell nobly discharging their duty. I take occasion, in conclusion, to acknowledge my obligations to the officers of my staff, Captain W. T. Taliaferro, assistant adjutant-general, Captain Moore, inspector-genera
Seventh. 1. The light batteries will be distributed as follows: To Brigadier-General Ewell's command, Captain Walker's six pieces. 2. To Brigadier-General Jones's command, Captains Alberti's and Stanard's batteries--eight pieces. 3. To Brigadier-General Longstreet's command, Colonel Pendleton's and Captain Inberton's batteries--eight pieces. 4. Brigadier-General Bonham's command, Captains Kemper's and Shields's batteries--eight pieces. 5. To Colonel Cocke's command, Colonel Hunton's, Captain Latham's, and Beckham's batteries--twelve pieces. Eighth. Colonel Redford, commanding cavalry, will detail to report immediately, as follows: To Brigadier-General Ewell, two companies cavalry. To Brigadier-General Jones, two companies cavalry. To Brigadier-General Longstreet, two companies cavalry. To Brigadier-General Bonham, three companies cavalry. To Colonel Cocke the remaining companies of cavalry, except those on special service. Ninth. The F
ell's Ford, to be used according to circumstances. Seventh.--The light batteries will be distributed as follows: 1. To General Ewell's command, Captain Walker's six pieces. 2. To Brigadier-General Jones, Captains Albertis' and Standard's batteries, eight pieces. 3. To Brigadier-General Longstreet, Colonel Pendleton's and Captain Imboden's batteries, eight pieces. 4. To Brigadier-General Bonham, Captains Kemper's and Shields' batteries, eight pieces. 5. To Colonel Cocke, Colonel Hunton's, Captains Latham's and Beckham's batteries, twelve pieces. Eighth.--Colonel Radford, commanding cavalry, will detail, to report immediately, as follows: To Brigadier-General Ewell, two companies cavalry. To Brigadier-General Jones, two companies cavalry. To Brigadier-General Longstreet, two companies cavalry. To General Bonham, three companies cavalry. To Colonel Cocke, the remaining companies of cavalry, except those on special service. Ninth.--The Fourth and Fift
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Garnett's brigade at Gettysburg. (search)
Garnett's brigade at Gettysburg. [The following letter explains the report which follows, and which will be an addition to our series of reports on that great battle.] Charlottesville, Virginia, March 23d, 1875. To the Secretary of the Southern Historical Society: Dear Sir — In looking up some old papers a few days ago, I found the inclosed report of the part taken by Garnett's brigade (first Cocke's, then Pickett's, then Garnett's, and lastly Hunton's) in the battle of Gettysburg. I am not sure who is the author of the report, as it is unsigned, but am under the impression that Lieutenant-Colonel Charles S. Peyton, of the Nineteenth Virginia infantry, wrote or dictated it. Colonel Peyton (at that time Major of the Nineteenth Virginia) was the senior field officer who escaped from the charge on Cemetery Hill and took command of the brigade after the battle. Colonel Henry Gantt was badly wounded in two places, and Lieutenant-Colonel Ellis was killed, as is reported in
South Carolina. After the withdrawal of the Confederate army from Fairfax Court House and the positions which had been occupied in front of that place, a movement was made by the enemy to cross the Potomac near Leesburg, where we had, under the command of Brigadier General N. S. Evans of South Carolina, four regiments of infantry (i. e., the Thirteenth, Seventeenth, and Eighteenth Mississippi, and the Eighth Virginia), commanded respectively by Colonels Barksdale, Featherston, Burt, and Hunton, a small detachment of cavalry under Lieutenant Colonel Jenifer, and some pieces of artillery. On October 21st the enemy commenced crossing the river at Edwards's Ferry. A brigade was thrown over and met by the Thirteenth Mississippi, which held them in check at the point of crossing. In the meantime another brigade was thrown over at Ball's Bluff, and as troops continued to cross at that point, where the Eighth Virginia had engaged them, General Evans ordered up the Seventeenth and Eig
sition to Constitution, 94, 104, 105, 106, 109. Hicks, Gov. of Maryland, 287, 289. Extract from address stating position of Maryland, 287-88. Proclamation to preserve peace, 288. Final message to state legislature, 292. Higginson, —, 61. Hill, Col. A. P., 298. Col. D. H., 297. Hinks, Charles D., 291. Holmes, General, 319, 320, 390, 393. Holt, Joseph, 543-44. Howard, Charles, 290-91. Huger, General, 296. Hulburt, —, 314. Hunter, —, 58, 228. Hunton, Colonel, 376-77. Huse, Maj., Caleb. Emissary to Europe to secure arms for Confederacy, 270. Letter concerning war supplies for Eng-land, 413-14. I Independence, Declaration of, 15, 34, 41, 42, 48-49, 55, 69-70, 75, 98, 99, 101, 108, 121, 148, 190. Indiana territory, Slavery question in, 5-6. J Jackson, Gov. of Missouri, 358, 360-61, 364, 365, 367, 370. Reply to U. S. call for troops, 354. Proclamation calling for troops, 362. Attempt to maintain peace, 362-63. Andre<
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