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Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 76 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 50 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 49 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 42 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 28 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 35 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 32 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 19 1 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 19 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Hurlbut or search for Hurlbut in all documents.

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at Corinth was reported to him, with wonderful exaggerations of the Confederate strength-100,000, 200,000 men-he determined to mass Buell and Grant against the army at that point; and Buell was ordered, March 15th, to unite his forces with Grant's, a movement previously suggested by him. Meanwhile, the expedition up the Tennessee was begun by C. F. Smith, on the 10th of March, with a new division under Sherman in advance. On the 13th of March, Smith assembled four divisions-Sherman's, Hurlbut's, Lew Wallace's, and W. H. L. Wallace's, at Savannah, on the right bank of the Tennessee, at its Great Bend. Smith at once sent Sherman with his division, escorted by two gunboats, to land below Eastport and make a break in the Memphis & Charleston Railroad between Tuscumbia and Corinth. Sherman, finding a Confederate battery at Eastport, disembarked below at the mouth of the Yellow River, and started for Burnsville; but, becoming discouraged at the continued rains, the swollen streams,
burg and Corinth road, and following the ridge led into both the Bark road and the Corinth road by numerous approaches. Across this to Sherman's left, with an interval between them, Prentiss's division (the Sixth) was posted. Covering this interval, but some distance back, lay McClernand's division (the First), with its right partially masked by Sherman's left. Some two miles in rear of the front line, and about three-quarters of a mile in advance of Pittsburg, were encamped to the left, Hurlbut's (the Fourth), and to the right, Smith's (the Second) division, the latter under General W. H. L. Wallace. The Federal front was an arc or very obtuse angle extending from where the Purdy road crossed Owl Creek to the ford near the mouth of Lick Creek, which was guarded by Stuart's brigade. General Lew Wallace's division was five or six miles distant, with one brigade at Crump's Landing, and the other two on the Adamsville road, with intervals of some two miles, in observation of Cheatha
fusion there. Confederate centre and right. Hurlbut's position. the Federal key. Statham's attafirst alarm, Sherman sent back to McClernand, Hurlbut, and W. H. L. Wallace, for help. McClernand h Missouri, 450 strong, to Sherman's aid; and Hurlbut had sent him Veatch's brigade. McClernand haine on the Federal left and was pressing back Hurlbut and Stuart. While these furious combats, II.-mid-day. When the battle first began, Hurlbut and W. H. L. Wallace had been apprised, and hsses. The locality was probably that held by Hurlbut's brigades, and they opposed a desperate defeht, strengthening it. Sweeney also reinforced Hurlbut with three regiments. There had been fourwas forced back and doubled up on itself; and Hurlbut had more than once fallen back, retiring his d, and at the mercy of his adversaries. With Hurlbut gone and Wallace gone, Prentiss was left isol as well as upon the national troops. General Hurlbut, in a letter to the writer, says that he [1 more...]
have had a general supervision of Grant's troops. Wallace's, Prentiss's, and Hurlbut's divisions, had almost disappeared from the contest; but as their residuary lving to recover their lost prestige. McClernand aided in leading the men, and Hurlbut was active in reorganizing the troops, and bringing them up at critical moments. General Hurlbut informs the writer that his division was complete in organization, every regiment in place in line of battle, both Sunday evening and Monday morning. The writer feels that it is due to General Hurlbut to give this statement, though his own inference from the Federal reports is different. This large forcs in the day. Major Taylor is commended by Sherman, and Lieutenant Brotzman by Hurlbut; and Buell speaks in high terms of the services of Mendenhall's, Terrell's, anf the enemy, we engaged on Sunday the divisions of Generals Prentiss, Sherman, Hurlbut, McClernand, and Smith, of 9,000 men each, or at least 45,000 men. This force