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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 56 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Steven A. Hurlbut or search for Steven A. Hurlbut in all documents.

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imony that the troops there stationed were withdrawn on the twenty-fifth of January last, in order to accompany the Meridian expedition under General Sherman. General Hurlbut testifies that he never received any instructions to permanently vacate the post, and deeming it important to occupy it, so that the rebels should not interru will send gunboats. If lost, it will be retaken immediately. I was informed, in reply, that Fort Pillow had no guns or garrison; had been evacuated; that General Hurlbut had force for its defence, etc. I understand that Fort Pillow had been evacuated and reoccupied, General Sherman not being aware of it. On the fourteenth he again instructed me as follows: What news from Columbus? Don't send men from Paris to Fort Pillow. Let General Hurlbut take care of that quarter. The Cairo troops may reenforce temporarily at Paducah and Columbus, but should be held ready to come up the Tennessee. One object that Forrest has is to induce us to make these d
nd thirteenth, I sent the following telegrams to Generals Burnside, Rosecrans, Hurlbut, Grant, and Sherman: Headquarters of the army, Washington, D. C., Septemired there, should move to prevent Bragg from reentering Middle Tennessee. General Hurlbut will aid you all he can, but most of Grant's available force is west of ths understood, is sick in New-Orleans. H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. Major-General Hurlbut, Memphis. Headquarters of the army, Washington, D. C., Sept. 13, 1863.ourteenth, the following telegrams were sent to Generals Foster, Burnside, and Hurlbut: Headquarters of the army, Washington, D. C., Sept. 14, 1863. Informaeenforcements as previously directed. H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. Major-General Hurlbut, Memphis. Headquarters of the army, Washington, D. C., Sept. 14, 1863. thus delaying the movements of General Grant's forces from Vicksburgh. General Hurlbut, however, had moved the troops of his own corps, then in East-Tennessee, w
night of the second of October, and the other boats came in on the third and fourth. On arrival at Memphis I saw General Hurlbut, and read all the despatches and letters of instructions of General Halleck, and therein derived my instructions, whosecrans for supplies, as the roads to his rear were already overtaxed to supply his present army. I learned from General Hurlbut that Osterhaus's division was already out in front of Corinth, and that John E. Smith was still at Memphis, moving hbest disposition of matters relating to this department, giving General McPherson full powers as to Mississippi, and General Hurlbut as to West-Tennessee, and assigned General Blair to the command of the Fifteenth army corps; and I summoned General General Hurlbut from Memphis, and General Dodge from Corinth, and selected out of the Sixteenth corps a force of about eight thousand men, Which I directed General Dodge to organize with all expedition and with it to follow me eastward. On the twenty-sev
discovered by a rebel scouting-party near Union City; and now we come to the explanation of the dispositions made by General Hurlbut to capture the rebel force at Jackson. Brigadier-General A. L. Smith, with six thousand men, one third of whom wereastward along that river to test the crossings at other places. Detecting these movements on the part of the enemy, General Hurlbut ordered all the bridges and trestle-work to be destroyed. This was done except in one case. The officer in command capture Forrest, and his whole command, was owing solely to the bridge not having been destroyed in compliance with General Hurlbut's orders. On the first instant, at ten o'clock in the forenoon, the force sent from Collierville to intercept they will remain there until they eat up the two hundred beeves they stole in this raid. There can be no doubt that if General Hurlbut's orders had been properly executed at La Fayette, Forrest and his whole force would now have been our prisoners.
's Depot. Weather fine and troops in good condition. General Hurlbut is crossing Big Black at Messenger, on the old Jacksonand stations burned, etc.; Sixteenth army corps, under General Hurlbut, pass to the front to-day; slight skirmishing to-day. bruary third, in two columns, one under the command of General Hurlbut, proceeding by the old Jackson road, and crossing the Seventeenth army corps, commanded respectively by Major-Generals Hurlbut and McPherson, with Major-General Sherman in commammunicated by one of his aids, Lieutenant Vernay, with General Hurlbut, who lay six miles north of us, and learned that the e arrived at Morton station, where we encamped to allow General Hurlbut's corps to pass. Morton is a very small place, and en, marched from Big Black River. General Sherman and General Hurlbut's division crossed at Messenger's Ferry, five miles abunty-seat of Newton County. The Sixteenth army corps, General Hurlbut, entered Meridian on the fourteenth of February, juts
egged for my things and saved nearly every thing; for while I was talking to the part of the mob who had entered my house, I sent mother off to look up some of the Generals, and to try to get a guard, telling them that I was being run over. General Hurlbut gave us the guard. Only five men entered my house, and demanded my keys. I took some time to get them, showing a great willingness; told them I hoped that they would not take my clothes. They said no; they only wanted all arms and gold an bad the Yankees are. I thought I knew, but I did not know the half. They took old Mrs.----'s teeth, all her spoons and knives, and destroyed all provisions and corn which they could not use. Two army corps were here — with Generals Sherman, Hurlbut, McPherson, and Leggett. Mother has been sick ever since the Yankees left. How glad I am that I did not get sick! No one need want to be with the Yankees, even for a few days. They staid here from Sunday until Saturday morning, and it appeare
th army corps, under General Ransom; and a portion of the Sixteenth army corps, under the command of General Smith. The Nineteenth corps is composed mainly of Eastern troops, and came with General Banks when he assumed command of this department. It is now under the command of General William B. Faulkner, formerly of the army of the Potomac, who is next in authority to General Banks. The divisions commanded by General Smith were recently in Grant's army, and in the corps commanded by General Hurlbut. They were sent to aid in the movement upon Shreveport, and began their operations by capturing Fort De Russy, and thus opening the Red River. General Smith occupied Alexandria, the parish-town of Rapides, situated on the Red River, and one of the most beautiful towns in the State. Alexandria was thus made the base of operations against Shreveport, and General Banks, proceeding thence in person, assumed command of the army. After concentrating at Alexandria, the army marched to Nat