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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 96 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 25, 1862., [Electronic resource] 9 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Felix Huston or search for Felix Huston in all documents.

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rleans. appointed to command of the army. Felix Huston. his career. his threats. General Johnstnanimity. grounds of his action in the duel. Huston's testimony. sufferings from the wounds. hosaining in command. Rusk soon found that Felix Huston, who had been chairman of the organization Felix Huston, who has already been mentioned. Huston was a Kentuckian, who had emigrated to Mississthe general order read. This was too much for Huston, already boiling over with rage. He sat down,same statement to me. It must be observed that Huston does not base his challenge upon this ground, airie. Colonel Morehouse objected that General Huston was familiar with, and expert in the use o that morning. I believe to this day that, if Huston had been killed or seriously wounded, there wonston that he never felt any resentment toward Huston, as is evident from his correspondence and froest from the letter, already quoted, of General Felix Huston.. Colonel W. S. Fisher, after retiring [38 more...]
down to Lavaca Bay, butchering and plundering as they went. Twenty or thirty persons were killed, and great booty taken. But the time was gone when these forays could be made with impunity. A militia as hardy, as daring, and more intelligent than themselves, was on their track. It rallied, following and attacking whenever it could overtake them. While they contended with the rangers who were harassing their flanks and rear, they were intercepted at Plum Creek by other militia, under Felix Huston and Burleson, and routed with heavy loss. In the raid they lost about eighty warriors and most of their booty. In October severe retaliation was meted out to the Comanches by Colonel Moore, with a force of ninety Texans and twelve Lipans. He fell upon their village on the Red Fork of the Colorado, 300 miles above Austin, and killed 130 Indians and captured thirty-four, together with about 500 horses. This was the end of Comanche incursions for a long time. Finding war with the Tex