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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. C. Hutcheson or search for J. C. Hutcheson in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
s eloquent allusion to it. General Lee, the dashing cavalryman of the Army of Northern Virginia, was appropriately introduced by Judge Gustave Cook, the gallant Colonel of the Texas Rangers, who in few but well-chosen words presented to the audience the soldier-orator of Virginia. Nowhere has General Lee's lecture excited more appreciative or enthusiastic applause. Then followed a magnificent banquet in the beautiful dining-hall of the Capitol Hotel, which was presided over by Hon. J. C. Hutcheson, and at which there were a number of good speeches in response to appropriate toasts. General George D. Johnston, our able and efficient General Agent, came down from Austin to be with us, and made an eloquent response to a toast to the Army of Tennessee. We bade a reluctant farewell to our friends of the committees who had provided so efficiently for our charming entertainment, and the splendid success of the lecture, and at an early hour the next morning—March 3rd—we were off
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
s eloquent allusion to it. General Lee, the dashing cavalryman of the Army of Northern Virginia, was appropriately introduced by Judge Gustave Cook, the gallant Colonel of the Texas Rangers, who in few but well-chosen words presented to the audience the soldier-orator of Virginia. Nowhere has General Lee's lecture excited more appreciative or enthusiastic applause. Then followed a magnificent banquet in the beautiful dining-hall of the Capitol Hotel, which was presided over by Hon. J. C. Hutcheson, and at which there were a number of good speeches in response to appropriate toasts. General George D. Johnston, our able and efficient General Agent, came down from Austin to be with us, and made an eloquent response to a toast to the Army of Tennessee. We bade a reluctant farewell to our friends of the committees who had provided so efficiently for our charming entertainment, and the splendid success of the lecture, and at an early hour the next morning—March 3rd—we were off