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Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6., The Lawrence Light Guard.—Continued. (search)
ouse now standing on the site. The next building was occupied by William S. Barker grocer, and Leonard Johnson, dealer in grain and meal on the lower floor. James Hyde, painter, occupied the second floor. There were two long oat troughs at the side of the street for feeding horses. The drivers could get gingerbread, crackerago. In the building just south of Tufts place, Mrs. Augustus Baker, afterward the landlady at the Medford House, had a variety store in 1830. About 1840, Mr. James Hyde bought the place and opened an oyster house. The land is now owned by his family. He dug a well on the street line and furnished a watering trough. This was probably the first one in town set at the street curb for public use. Mr. Hyde had a dispute with the town about the street line, and every few years would fence off a portion of the roadway. He finally received payment for what he claimed. George E. Willis, tin ware manufacturer, put up a building on these premises, using one
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6., The Baptist Church of Medford. (search)
and Richard Tufts' wheelwright shop on the same side were also laid in ashes. On the opposite side of Main street the fire commenced at the bridge with the dwelling of Nathan W. Wait, and swept down Daniel Lawrence's store and dwelling house Jas. Hyde's dwelling and store, Elias Tufts' wheelwright shop and dwelling, George E. Willis' tinware shop and dwelling, Mitchell's barber shop and dwelling, Benj. Parker's dwelling and stable, Moses Merrill and Son's paint shop, and Hartshorn's harness fortunately, the flames in this direction were stayed. Mr. John Schwartz' saw factory was destroyed with $300 worth of saws. His furniture and his own and his wife's clothing were all lost. Some of the houses named above were occupied by James Hyde, Henry Forbes, Aborn, the hatter, on Washington street, Boston. Mr. Lawrence's loss is about $2,500, no insurance. Mr. Joyce had about $5,000 of lumber destroyed. Accommodating.—We feel under special obligations to Mr. Tarbox of the Revere