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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 1 (search)
tion from Pennsylvania. Every thing should be destroyed which would facilitate his movements through the Valley. In a few days the army was strengthened by the accession of Brigadier-General Bee, Colonel Elzey, and the Ninth Georgia regiment. It was then reorganized. Jackson's brigade was formed of the Second, Fourth, Fifth, and Twenty-seventh Virginia regiments, and Pendleton's battery; Bee's of the Second and Eleventh Mississippi, Fourth Alabama, and Second Tennessee regiments, and Imboden's battery; Elzey's of the Tenth and Thirteenth Virginia, Third Tennessee and Maryland regiments, and Groves's battery; and Bartow's of the Seventh, Eighth, and Ninth Georgia regiments, the Kentucky Battalion, and Alburtis's battery. As the intelligence obtained from Maryland indicated that General Patterson was preparing to cross the Potomac again, Colonel Jackson was sent with his brigade to the vicinity of Martinsburg to support the cavalry. He was instructed also to protect and aid
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 2 (search)
advantage given to this position by its greater elevation than that of the opposite ridge, on which the enemy stood, by its broad, level top, and by the extent of open ground before it, he formed his brigade, including Bartow's two regiments and Imboden's battery, there; but, being appealed to for aid by Evans, then fully engaged, and seeing that his troops, that had suffered much in the unequal contest, were about to be overwhelmed, he moved forward to disengage him, and, crossing the valley rage and admirable soldiership, seconded by the excellent conduct of the gentlemen he had assembled in his legion, contributed greatly to the maintenance of order in the retreat. His lieutenant-colonel, Johnson, fell while gallantly aiding him. Imboden rendered excellent service with his battery in this difficult operation. On the ground where he intended to reform, Bee met Jackson at the head of his brigade, and they began, the one to reform, and the other to deploy, simultaneously; Jacks
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Letters. (search)
ted by Colonel Wilcox's brigade, Colonel Stuart's regiment of cavalry, and the whole of Walton's battery, will form the reserve, and will march via Mitchell's Ford, to be used according to circumstances. 7th. The light batteries will be distributed as follows: (1.) To General Ewell's command; Captain Walker's, six pieces. (2.) To Brigadier-General Jones; Captains Alburtis's and Stannard's batteries, eight pieces. (3.) To Brigadier-General Longstreet's; Colonel Pendleton's and Captain Imboden's batteries, eight pieces. (4.) To Brigadier-General Bonham's; Captains Kemper's and Shields's batteries, eight pieces. (5.) To Colonels Cocke and Hunton; Captains Latham's and Beckham's batteries, twelve pieces. 8th. Colonel Radford, commanding cavalry, will detail to report immediately as follows: To General Ewell, two companies of cavalry. To General Jones, two companies of cavalry. To General Longstreet, two companies of cavalry. To General Bonham, two comp